Zionsville senior critical after crash

Zionsville senior critical after crash

There are 210 comments on the The Indianapolis Star story from May 26, 2007, titled Zionsville senior critical after crash. In it, The Indianapolis Star reports that:

A Zionsville Community High School senior remained in critical condition at Methodist Hospital on Friday after crashing his Jeep Cherokee into a tree in Boone County.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Indianapolis Star.

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indyRN

Indianapolis, IN

#1 May 26, 2007
Pray for our kids people,

pray for all of our kids.
oh well

Naperville, IL

#2 May 26, 2007
aaa Sheriff , you immediately say you have programs in place to prevent this ? You immediately treat the young man as a victim.Where is this young mans responsibility in this accident ?
Stella

AOL

#3 May 26, 2007
Pray for our kids, and for human beings who make statements like "Oh well", who have lost the meaning of what it means to be a compassionate human being.
Anne Frink

AOL

#4 May 26, 2007
I'm praying for all of the Pavey's. Very dear friends.
Roger Zanes

Cincinnati, OH

#6 May 26, 2007
I am the father of a Zionsville High senior whose son is on the 4x100 relay team that Jon Pavey was on and that qualified for the State championship next week at IU. Jon has been one of my son's closest friends since we moved here three years ago and Jon is a young man my wife and I love dearly. Yesterday afternoon, my son and I were at the hospital where Jon is fighting for his life; we were there with about 30 or so others who also love Jon dearly. I can assure you as a father that there are few things more emotionally devastating than seeing a loved child fighting for his/her life and being in a room filled with strong men reduced to tears. In the first Indystar.com article about Jon, several people found it necessary to put up posts which I found distasteful, cruel, insensitive, and mean, and I would hope these negative-energy subhumans will stay away from this one. I also ask that all who read this post pray for Jon's recovery and for his family, and also pray that those who will still find it necessary to use this post to vent, pontificate, preach, or otherwise focus on what is important to THEM may soon find the wisdom and maturity to learn to focus on what is really important in life. To Jon and his family: we love you and will always be there for you.
New Palasteen Farmboy

United States

#7 May 26, 2007
Pray for the family and try to figure out how to stop this from happening to another family.
Megan

Florence, KY

#8 May 26, 2007
Roger Zanes wrote:
I am the father of a Zionsville High senior whose son is on the 4x100 relay team that Jon Pavey was on and that qualified for the State championship next week at IU. Jon has been one of my son's closest friends since we moved here three years ago and Jon is a young man my wife and I love dearly. Yesterday afternoon, my son and I were at the hospital where Jon is fighting for his life; we were there with about 30 or so others who also love Jon dearly. I can assure you as a father that there are few things more emotionally devastating than seeing a loved child fighting for his/her life and being in a room filled with strong men reduced to tears. In the first Indystar.com article about Jon, several people found it necessary to put up posts which I found distasteful, cruel, insensitive, and mean, and I would hope these negative-energy subhumans will stay away from this one. I also ask that all who read this post pray for Jon's recovery and for his family, and also pray that those who will still find it necessary to use this post to vent, pontificate, preach, or otherwise focus on what is important to THEM may soon find the wisdom and maturity to learn to focus on what is really important in life. To Jon and his family: we love you and will always be there for you.


You would hope that they would stay away, but unfortunately they won't...losers thrive on being cruel. I hope everyone will lift Jon up in prayer.
Doug

Indianapolis, IN

#10 May 26, 2007
Young people need to learn to pace themselves when drinking alcohol.
ER-RN

AOL

#11 May 26, 2007
Uh Clem wrote:
Just think of it as evolution in action.
We make our choices. We must accept our consequences. Some people think they are immortal. They fail to learn from the mistakes of others.
What a horrible thing to say; obviously you've never had teenagers.

Did you know that teenagers brains haven't even fully developed their reasoning process until ages 18-20 yrs of age?

It is one reason why, as parents, we find teenage years to be so exasperating.

They have adult bodies with adolescent reasoning in competition with adult hormones.

I've raised 3 teenage girls and one boy. Two of the three girls are in their mid-30's and the 3rd one is 17; my son is 18.

Not one thing has changed as to the way teens act and think between the the decades time frame of having my children.

I'm fortunate none of my children ever made their bad choices beyond the occasional alcohol thing with their friends, which still happened even though I consistently preached to the the dangers of alcohol from the time they entered middle school.

It really is a 'peer' thing.

My beef, is that the police never prosecute the older teens or young adults, over age 18, for supplying the alcohol to the younger teens.
karensflowers

AOL

#12 May 26, 2007
My teenage daughter is a good friend of Jon's and is in a horrible state of mind right now - saying she'd just spoken with him on the phone the night before.

Why is it that police never prosecute the people who supply the alcohol?

One time a few years ago, when my 15 yr old daughter was having friends over in late afternoon (about 10 kids), I walked into the basement family room and saw one of the male teens holding a full bottle of vodka.

I picked up the basement phone, stood in front of the stairs (the only way out) and called the police and told them to just come in and on down to the basement.

I handed the vodka to the policeman and told him I wanted the person prosecuted who brought the bottle into my home. Obviously, the fingerprints would be on the bottle.

They never went any further than breathalyzing the teens and releasing them to their parents.

If police really want to cut down on teenage drinking, they are going to have to start finding out who supplies the alcohol to the young kids.
No kidding

Marysville, OH

#13 May 26, 2007
Roger Zanes wrote:
I am the father of a Zionsville High senior whose son is on the 4x100 relay team that Jon Pavey was on and that qualified for the State championship next week at IU. Jon has been one of my son's closest friends since we moved here three years ago and Jon is a young man my wife and I love dearly. Yesterday afternoon, my son and I were at the hospital where Jon is fighting for his life; we were there with about 30 or so others who also love Jon dearly. I can assure you as a father that there are few things more emotionally devastating than seeing a loved child fighting for his/her life and being in a room filled with strong men reduced to tears. In the first Indystar.com article about Jon, several people found it necessary to put up posts which I found distasteful, cruel, insensitive, and mean, and I would hope these negative-energy subhumans will stay away from this one. I also ask that all who read this post pray for Jon's recovery and for his family, and also pray that those who will still find it necessary to use this post to vent, pontificate, preach, or otherwise focus on what is important to THEM may soon find the wisdom and maturity to learn to focus on what is really important in life. To Jon and his family: we love you and will always be there for you.
You know - qualifying for the state championship isn't the most important thing in the world. A high school classmate of mine got drunk during his second year at Princeton and electrocuted himself, climbing on top of the Dinky train that runs to the New Jersey Railroad station from the university. He lost both legs and one arm, but he survived. He graduated from Princeton and went to medical school at UC-SF. He's now a doctor, specializing in internal medicine. He is married and has a service animal whose only service seems to be fetching his own leash. B.J. rides bikes and has been very involved with the Para-Olympics. Whenever people cite Darwin in connection with an 18 year old's drunken accident, I think of B.J.- who certainly did NOT need to take himself out of the gene pool. He made a mistake. He had to live with the consequences - and he has lived a life richer than many folks who have all of their arms and legs.

If Jon can survive, he will put things back together, differently, but maybe better.
whatever

Florence, KY

#14 May 26, 2007
karensflowers wrote:
My teenage daughter is a good friend of Jon's and is in a horrible state of mind right now - saying she'd just spoken with him on the phone the night before.
Why is it that police never prosecute the people who supply the alcohol?
One time a few years ago, when my 15 yr old daughter was having friends over in late afternoon (about 10 kids), I walked into the basement family room and saw one of the male teens holding a full bottle of vodka.
I picked up the basement phone, stood in front of the stairs (the only way out) and called the police and told them to just come in and on down to the basement.
I handed the vodka to the policeman and told him I wanted the person prosecuted who brought the bottle into my home. Obviously, the fingerprints would be on the bottle.
They never went any further than breathalyzing the teens and releasing them to their parents.
If police really want to cut down on teenage drinking, they are going to have to start finding out who supplies the alcohol to the young kids.
Good for you! I wish more parents would parent their children and stop trying to be one of their friends. I can't help but wondering if a parent of one of Jon's friends let Jon and others drink at their house. A parent should never condone underage drinking by using the stupid excuse that they'd rather do it at home than somewhere else.
Zionsville

Pittsboro, IN

#15 May 26, 2007
love bears all things, love believes all things, love FORGIVES all things...

One only needs to know that we in Zionsville love Jon and his family to understand that his actions aren't on our minds right now. We all love the Paveys and our hearts hurt for them right now.

We'd ask all of you to join us in sincere prayer for the healing of these friends of ours.
Z-ville friend

Pittsboro, IN

#16 May 26, 2007
karensflowers wrote:
My teenage daughter is a good friend of Jon's and is in a horrible state of mind right now - saying she'd just spoken with him on the phone the night before.
Why is it that police never prosecute the people who supply the alcohol?
One time a few years ago, when my 15 yr old daughter was having friends over in late afternoon (about 10 kids), I walked into the basement family room and saw one of the male teens holding a full bottle of vodka.
I picked up the basement phone, stood in front of the stairs (the only way out) and called the police and told them to just come in and on down to the basement.
I handed the vodka to the policeman and told him I wanted the person prosecuted who brought the bottle into my home. Obviously, the fingerprints would be on the bottle.
They never went any further than breathalyzing the teens and releasing them to their parents.
If police really want to cut down on teenage drinking, they are going to have to start finding out who supplies the alcohol to the young kids.
People... When are you going to wake up and realize it's not the responsibility of the police. It's the parents' responsibility to educate their children to the dangers in our world. Who supplies the alcohol? It was probably raided from your cabinet!!!!
As the mother of two. We sit down at the dinner table to discuss situations. We can say "No" all we want but kids will do it anyway.(Remember when we disobeyed our parents?)
Why not offer free rides (No questions asked) and talk about what we would do differently the next time inorder to remain safe.
My prayers go out to Jon and his family.
Godspeed!!!
Have A Heart

Carmel, IN

#17 May 26, 2007
No kidding wrote:
<quoted text>
You know - qualifying for the state championship isn't the most important thing in the world. A high school classmate of mine got drunk during his second year at Princeton and electrocuted himself, climbing on top of the Dinky train that runs to the New Jersey Railroad station from the university. He lost both legs and one arm, but he survived. He graduated from Princeton and went to medical school at UC-SF. He's now a doctor, specializing in internal medicine. He is married and has a service animal whose only service seems to be fetching his own leash. B.J. rides bikes and has been very involved with the Para-Olympics. Whenever people cite Darwin in connection with an 18 year old's drunken accident, I think of B.J.- who certainly did NOT need to take himself out of the gene pool. He made a mistake. He had to live with the consequences - and he has lived a life richer than many folks who have all of their arms and legs.
If Jon can survive, he will put things back together, differently, but maybe better.
Very good post.
I ache for this family and this young man.
The fact remains that had the drunk driver had been other than Jon himself, everyone would feel less pity for the perpetrator.
It's a horrible state of affairs.
To those of us who feel that actions demand consequences...remember that hoping for the best, even praying for the best- hurts no one and has nothing to do with justice.
Teacher not at Zionsville

Latonia, KY

#19 May 26, 2007
I pray every spring for all of the seniors who are out celebrating their accomplishments, hoping we won't read about another tragedy.

Parents, love your children enough to put your foot down and tell them no to alcohol. If you or your child is hosting a party, keep watch and practice tough love.

After 20+ years of teaching, I'm tired of mourning.

Prayers and good wishes to Jon, his family, and his caregivers as he fights the biggest battle of his life.
Teacher not at Zionsville

Latonia, KY

#20 May 26, 2007
And, of course, the second sentence in the second paragraph should read "are hosting".
karensflowers

AOL

#22 May 26, 2007
Z-ville friend wrote:
<quoted text>
People... When are you going to wake up and realize it's not the responsibility of the police. It's the parents' responsibility to educate their children to the dangers in our world. Who supplies the alcohol? It was probably raided from your cabinet!!!!
As the mother of two. We sit down at the dinner table to discuss situations. We can say "No" all we want but kids will do it anyway.(Remember when we disobeyed our parents?)
Hey, ill-informed "who="Z-ville friend", you show your pre-determined, generalizationing intellect when you state things like, "it was probably raided from your own cabinet". You disgust me.

For you information, we don't keep alcohol in our home - we don't drink.

I have raised four teens myself, I am a registered nurse and have seen in emergency rooms what alcohol does to people of every age, and lost a brother to suicide when in an alcohol-dazed state - he was just 17 yrs old. So don't preach to me I need to parent my children better.

You are wrong. It is both a parent's job to instill the many dangers and values in life to their children, but it is up to the police to enforce laws.

So get off your high-horse lady.
Kip Johnston

Downers Grove, IL

#23 May 26, 2007
ER-RN wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you know that teenagers brains haven't even fully developed their reasoning process until ages 18-20 yrs of age?
I guess maybe we should go after his parents for getting him a car, the dealer too, for selling it, then the state gov for making the legal driving age 16 because is obvious his brain wasn't fully developed.
former Hoosier

Plattsburgh, NY

#24 May 26, 2007
We were all teenagers once and I am sure we all made bad choices during this time in our lives. There but for the grace of God lies me. Alcohol is a problem in this country that goes across all ages and backgrounds and is probably the single largest contributor to deaths in the Unites States, both directly through accidents and crime and indirectly through disease caused by excessive drinking. Instead of being critical or cruel of this young mans choice we need to work together to come up with more effective means to combat the effects of excessive drinking and alcoholism. I pray not only for the recovery of this young man but for all teenagers who face the many difficult choices growing up in this society. May they all learn from this tragic event and make the right decisions.

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