not illegal

Nashville, TN

#85 Jun 4, 2012
"February 20, 2012 -- WASHINGTON -- Governors and lawmakers in a handful of states including Tennessee are taking steps to tackle the growing scourge of prescription drug abuse.

All but two states and the District of Columbia have enacted some kind of prescription drug monitoring program, but many state officials argue that this is not enough.

"This growing problem is so frightening because while FDA-approved prescription opiates are easy to get, many are just as addicting and dangerous as street heroin and crack cocaine," Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin said in his State of the State address last month.

Shumlin has proposed giving law enforcement personnel access to the state's prescription drug monitoring system, currently accessible only to doctors and pharmacists, who enter a record in the database any time a patient is prescribed a potentially addictive drug, classified as a schedule II, III or IV controlled substance.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam also is taking aim at his state's prescription drug database, which only requires prescribers to record that they've written a prescription. In a Haslam-backed bill, all prescribers and drug dispensers would be required to check the database prior to prescribing a controlled substance, and Tennessee would be able to share data with other states to cut down on doctor-shopping.

Tennessee is the second-most medicated state in the country, trailing only West Virginia, according to a Forbes Magazine analysis, which tracked the number of retail prescriptions filled compared to the number of residents in the state. Doctors in Tennessee have been slow to mobilize around stopping prescription drug abuse, but the state's largest physician organization says it hopes to support a bill in the legislature this year to address the problem."

http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2012/feb...
wait

Nashville, TN

#86 Jun 4, 2012
"New law may aid pain pill epidemic"

The Chattanooga Times Free Press
updated 6/2/2012 10:54:40 PM ET

Chattanooga, Tenn. Last year, the top 10 medical prescribers in Tennessee wrote prescriptions for more than 20 million doses of restricted pain medication, with the top prescriber in the state doling out more than one-quarter of those.

That is more than three pills for each of the state's 6 million-plus residents, but it's only a small fraction of the doses handed out by more than 30,000 medical prescribers statewide.

Together, all prescribers in the state wrote nearly 18 million prescriptions for controlled substances such as Oxycontin and hydrocodone, according to an April report to the Tennessee General Assembly. Excluding certain drugs that were added in 2011, the number of prescriptions written increased about 23 percent from 2010 to 2011.

The numbers put Tennessee among the top states in the nation for so many things -- prescriptions written, oxycodone and hydrocodone sales and drug overdose deaths.

But officials say a new law puts Tennessee in the top spot for something else -- being one of the first states to require doctors to check a drug monitoring database before they prescribe pain medication as part of a new treatment.

Tennessee's drug monitoring database has been up and running since 2007, but only about a third of the state's doctors are registered to use it, and even fewer regularly check patient information, officials say.

The new law also requires pharmacists to upload prescription information every seven days rather than every 30 days, and allows state officials to determine which doctors are prescribing the most painkillers.

"This is landmark legislation that can be a model for the nation -- it puts Tennessee in the forefront of addressing this issue," said Bill Gibbons, commissioner of the state Department of Safety and Homeland Security, who helped craft the bill. "As we talked to people across the state, this was the number one issue for almost everyone."

Gibbons and other officials said they hope the changes will make doctors more aware of the number of prescriptions they write and allow them to spot patients who are "doctor-shopping" to buy pain medication for an addiction or to resell.

But some critics, including doctors, say the law puts a burden on all doctors rather than targeting the few who are careless or overprescribe. Others don't think the law goes far enough, pointing out there are no clear rules for enforcement or penalties.

"It's a step in the right direction -- I think it's another good step -- but I don't think it goes far enough," said Dr. John Blake, a Chattanooga pain management doctor who said he already does everything the law requires. "It may be a bit of a hassle for doctors, but it's a small price to pay," he said of the mandatory use of the drug database."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47662068/ns/local...
wait

Nashville, TN

#87 Jun 4, 2012
in pain wrote:
Thanks you lovely one...& to Dixie my head pharmacist said its nut..who do u suggest we contact to see Whats really going on?
The Govenor's Office.

Addresses, email addys, and phone numbers as easily found, as ALL of the information - with provided links to substantiate - have been, in RESEARCHING, through simple Google search.
dixie lee

Jacksboro, TN

#88 Jun 4, 2012
to not illegal i read it and understand but that doesnt change the fact they are doing things by the book either. some patients are not being cut down on there medication while others are so why? my mother goes there and hasnt been short not one time and she got her medication cut in half while her friends medication stayed the same. yes have proof cause she showed us the bottle so whats up with that? they say its the DEA well dont all patients fall under the same rules as well? what do they have their picks or something? seems like that to me!
wait

Nashville, TN

#89 Jun 4, 2012
dixie lee wrote:
if there is no new dea rules in place for cutting back on pain medication then it sounds like to me that there doing something illegal. why dont someone get the MEDIA involed in this. then the real truth will surface. once again its all the pill snorting addicts that made this happen.
The articles on this page alone, are considerably longer then the excerpts of them in the above posts. Please click on them to read the full articles.

Calling the media, in the manner you're coming across in, would only result in embarrassing yourself.
LovelyOneInCrazy Town

Irmo, SC

#90 Jun 4, 2012
not illegal wrote:
"February 20, 2012 -- WASHINGTON -- Governors and lawmakers in a handful of states including Tennessee are taking steps to tackle the growing scourge of prescription drug abuse.

All but two states and the District of Columbia have enacted some kind of prescription drug monitoring program, but many state officials argue that this is not enough.

"This growing problem is so frightening because while FDA-approved prescription opiates are easy to get, many are just as addicting and dangerous as street heroin and crack cocaine," Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin said in his State of the State address last month.

Shumlin has proposed giving law enforcement personnel access to the state's prescription drug monitoring system, currently accessible only to doctors and pharmacists, who enter a record in the database any time a patient is prescribed a potentially addictive drug, classified as a schedule II, III or IV controlled substance.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam also is taking aim at his state's prescription drug database, which only requires prescribers to record that they've written a prescription. In a Haslam-backed bill, all prescribers and drug dispensers would be required to check the database prior to prescribing a controlled substance, and Tennessee would be able to share data with other states to cut down on doctor-shopping.

Tennessee is the second-most medicated state in the country, trailing only West Virginia, according to a Forbes Magazine analysis, which tracked the number of retail prescriptions filled compared to the number of residents in the state. Doctors in Tennessee have been slow to mobilize around stopping prescription drug abuse, but the state's largest physician organization says it hopes to support a bill in the legislature this year to address the problem."

http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2012/feb...
wow tn is that bad? Are they going by place of prescription or residency? Because there is a lot I hear that comes from Florida.
LovelyOneInCrazy Town

Irmo, SC

#91 Jun 4, 2012
wait wrote:
"New law may aid pain pill epidemic"

The Chattanooga Times Free Press
updated 6/2/2012 10:54:40 PM ET

Chattanooga, Tenn.— Last year, the top 10 medical prescribers in Tennessee wrote prescriptions for more than 20 million doses of restricted pain medication, with the top prescriber in the state doling out more than one-quarter of those.

That is more than three pills for each of the state's 6 million-plus residents, but it's only a small fraction of the doses handed out by more than 30,000 medical prescribers statewide.

Together, all prescribers in the state wrote nearly 18 million prescriptions for controlled substances such as Oxycontin and hydrocodone, according to an April report to the Tennessee General Assembly. Excluding certain drugs that were added in 2011, the number of prescriptions written increased about 23 percent from 2010 to 2011.

The numbers put Tennessee among the top states in the nation for so many things -- prescriptions written, oxycodone and hydrocodone sales and drug overdose deaths.

But officials say a new law puts Tennessee in the top spot for something else -- being one of the first states to require doctors to check a drug monitoring database before they prescribe pain medication as part of a new treatment.

Tennessee's drug monitoring database has been up and running since 2007, but only about a third of the state's doctors are registered to use it, and even fewer regularly check patient information, officials say.

The new law also requires pharmacists to upload prescription information every seven days rather than every 30 days, and allows state officials to determine which doctors are prescribing the most painkillers.

"This is landmark legislation that can be a model for the nation -- it puts Tennessee in the forefront of addressing this issue," said Bill Gibbons, commissioner of the state Department of Safety and Homeland Security, who helped craft the bill. "As we talked to people across the state, this was the number one issue for almost everyone."

Gibbons and other officials said they hope the changes will make doctors more aware of the number of prescriptions they write and allow them to spot patients who are "doctor-shopping" to buy pain medication for an addiction or to resell.

But some critics, including doctors, say the law puts a burden on all doctors rather than targeting the few who are careless or overprescribe. Others don't think the law goes far enough, pointing out there are no clear rules for enforcement or penalties.

"It's a step in the right direction -- I think it's another good step -- but I don't think it goes far enough," said Dr. John Blake, a Chattanooga pain management doctor who said he already does everything the law requires. "It may be a bit of a hassle for doctors, but it's a small price to pay," he said of the mandatory use of the drug database."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47662068/ns/local...
this is a great way to control. But I don't see how the argument that people should only regulate dirty doctors. As a patient with real medical needs can still abuse and doctor shop. They could be at a legit office and a dirty one. If all of it goes into a database then the doctors that are clean won't prescribe. I think it lessens their liability by knowing a patient has more prescriptions and protect their patients from over dose. They aren't just in the field of pain management they are there for the patients care, that is why many offices have a psychiatrist to evaluate the patients mental status and addictive possibilities.
dixie lee

Jacksboro, TN

#92 Jun 4, 2012
iam not embarassing myself but the truth will come out. why are u afraid that it will?
dixie lee

Jacksboro, TN

#93 Jun 4, 2012
also if other pain clinics that are ligit and are not cutting back on patients medication then somethings up with that. why go here in lafollette and pay $200 and and get cut down on your medication when you can go to knoxville and have ones insurance to pay for the visit and get more medication? patients dont have to put up with this nonsense. some people actually have chronic pain, cancer, aids, and etc. and need their medication. if your body is used to taking lets say 5 oxycodones and 4 hydrocodones a day then getting them cut in half isnt going to help with ones pain. i understand the fact that the DEA is trying to stop people from abusing drugs but this isnt the way to go about it. my opinion is that the government is mad just because their not getting a cut of the drug sale money. if they was then we wouldnt be having this problem in the first place. so they figured that cutting everyone down on their medication will stop the sale of pain pills. patient that really are in pain will take them as it states. well it might but a junkie will get their fix one way or another. this is just going to cause dope heads to start breaking into peoples homes and stealing their pills. this is going to cause more crime weather than helping it. people need to realize that not all people thats on pain pills are junkies or dealers or sellers.
Oye

Nashville, TN

#94 Jun 4, 2012
The gov't is mad because of what???

Excuse me. The government, as well as the NATION'S citizens is MAD (appalled, and terrified) that there has been a TWENTY FIVE PERCENT INCREASE in deaths due to OD's of these narcotics in just the last year, alone! Tennessee is SECOND IN THE NATION... CAMPBELL COUNTY is FIRST in the STATE for narcotic drug abuse. So YES it stands to reason that TN would be first on the band wagon to implement these new prescription policies. THAT'S what's "up with that". Geez.

And, who the hell knows why your mom would get less then the lady next door. I would think the BEST person to ask why she was cut back would be HER DOCTOR.
tn sux

Kingston, TN

#95 Jun 4, 2012
This is about as effective as having to I.D. everyone for the sale of beer no matter how old they are, or for making a law passable that says that teachers are liable to be sued if they let kids hold hands in the hallways at school. Who the hell in our state is coming up with these half-baked, twit brained laws anyways? Bill Haslam and the rest of our half backed state of tennessee congress people suck. If they think for one second that reducing people's pill prescription is going to stop the junkies and abusers, then they are far by wrong! The plastic card for Foodstamps was suppossed to cut down on the Foodstamp abuse and looked what happened? They've made it 10x easier for people to swindle the system. Give someone your card for cash and give them the pin number-that's it. I'm actually ashamed to be a citizen of this state. Tennessee is the first state to jump on everything. The people in this state are like sheep led to the slaughter...they don't fight any laws or anything. They just lay down and take it. Especially in these poverty striken counties like Campbell and Scott. The only people that gain anything in a county like Campbell or Scott is the richie riches that come down from the north and build their lake houses. And the old money that was already here. makes me sick!
Yo yo yo

Nashville, TN

#96 Jun 4, 2012
And if you work an have a 401k plan count on a large part of it is invested in the drug company that makes them. So when shares go down you will bitch about that too.
Oye wrote:
The gov't is mad because of what???
Excuse me. The government, as well as the NATION'S citizens is MAD (appalled, and terrified) that there has been a TWENTY FIVE PERCENT INCREASE in deaths due to OD's of these narcotics in just the last year, alone! Tennessee is SECOND IN THE NATION... CAMPBELL COUNTY is FIRST in the STATE for narcotic drug abuse. So YES it stands to reason that TN would be first on the band wagon to implement these new prescription policies. THAT'S what's "up with that". Geez.
And, who the hell knows why your mom would get less then the lady next door. I would think the BEST person to ask why she was cut back would be HER DOCTOR.
tn sux

Kingston, TN

#97 Jun 4, 2012
going back the whole death by cause of pill prescriptions, Oye, take a look around places like Scott County and Campbell County. There is nothing here for anyone. No jobs, nothing for the kids, no decent movie theaters, no malls....nothing. Driving through LaFollette is very depressing to say the least. Why has none of the county's politicians focused on getting industry here? How about businesses that could support decent wages? 7.25 an hour is not a decent wage, especially if you are making less than 32 hours a week. No wonder everyone in these two counties are on drugs! There is nothing here which makes the quality of life suck! If it wasn't for the fact that I had the will to actually make it out of the county a few times and experience what life above min wage was like, then I too, would have probably wound up on pills or worse.
dixie lee

Jacksboro, TN

#98 Jun 4, 2012
well she did and HER DOCTOR told her that everyone is getting cut down which was a big fat lie. as for the deaths for ODing on them they are only part of the reason why the DEA is doing this. once again it goes back to the ole might dollar. they are MONEY GREEDY. same goes for moonshine. there is nothing wrong with some good home brew but the government wants their cut as well. same goes for pills. a 30 roxie can sell for 20 and up to 35 or 40 dollars depending on how bad the junkie wants it. dont have to believe me just turn on the tv and watch it sometime. some either the persons insurance is paying for them or the customer doenst have insurance and has to pay for them out of pocket. the roxie 30s are almost 2 dollars a piece at the durgstore. the more u get the cheaper it is. then some people turn around and sell them and make alot of money. so if one sells 10 roxies at 30 each that $300. that is one week of working paycheck for me. the government which includes the DEA is putting a stop to this. they are just madd because they are not getting a cut of the money. it common sense it you think about it.
dixie lee

Jacksboro, TN

#99 Jun 4, 2012
i agree with you on the foodstamp deal. its low down and sorry of the parents to take a childs foodstamps away from them just to trade them for drugs. it goes on all the time. i worked at two different stores for 5 years and seen it all. i applied for foodstamps and only received 10 dollars a month so i didnt even bother signing back up for them. i know people that lie and get almost 600 dollars a month and its doubtfull if the kids see any of it. ive reported this person many times but nothing seems to happen. maybe the have pulls too. boy i wish i had some of the pulls. seems like to me if you are hard working and honest you get nothing but if your a crook and lie you get everything.
Cut

Nashville, TN

#100 Jun 4, 2012
I was told everyone was being cut because of new DEA rules. I don't mind the pharmacy monitoring system cause they won't find me doing anything wrong. My count has never been short. There are lots of people from Kentucky and Georgia that I have seen in the waiting rooms. There are usually more from Kentucky than Tennessee. They should have tapered off the patients to that amount, not cut them the large amount at one time. My pain has returned with a vengeance and I'm having difficulty walking. What is wrong with this whole picture? Why shouldn't a patient that truly needs their medication be prescribed what they need?
jeez

Nashville, TN

#101 Jun 5, 2012
LovelyOneInCrazyTown wrote:
<quoted text>
I see east Tennessee pain consultants dr browder. He helped me from being paralyzed. but the don't like pill seekers so if u want legit please be legit too. I don't want him wasting his time.
well now there ya go. ur on here way to damn much blabblin away all the time. every damn pill junkie around here gonna be reading this forum like the rabid rats they r they gonna all go running to that clinic n doc u post on here n guess what, since you like to put ur name on blast on here so much they gonna go in there and say YOU r their bff n sent em. be sure n let us know how that ends up workin out for ya and ur doc on ur next visit since i'm sure that clinic and the legit patients r gonna just love having you ruin it for them by all them infected rats stormin the place makin it a nightmare for all of em worse then it already is. you about damn stupid to not think that all the blabbin u do wasn't gonna catch up to u n now alot of innocent ppl - legit patients - gonna pay for it to. kudos
LovelyOneInCrazy Town

Irmo, SC

#102 Jun 5, 2012
Yo yo yo wrote:
<quoted text>And if you work an have a 401k plan count on a large part of it is invested in the drug company that makes them. So when shares go down you will bitch about that too.
oh good point!
LovelyOneInCrazy Town

Irmo, SC

#103 Jun 5, 2012
tn sux wrote:
going back the whole death by cause of pill prescriptions, Oye, take a look around places like Scott County and Campbell County. There is nothing here for anyone. No jobs, nothing for the kids, no decent movie theaters, no malls....nothing. Driving through LaFollette is very depressing to say the least. Why has none of the county's politicians focused on getting industry here? How about businesses that could support decent wages? 7.25 an hour is not a decent wage, especially if you are making less than 32 hours a week. No wonder everyone in these two counties are on drugs! There is nothing here which makes the quality of life suck! If it wasn't for the fact that I had the will to actually make it out of the county a few times and experience what life above min wage was like, then I too, would have probably wound up on pills or worse.
me and another lady are hoping to start a family activity that can get kids involved in other activities. That's what we need to do break the cycle!
LovelyOneInCrazy Town

Irmo, SC

#104 Jun 5, 2012
dixie lee wrote:
well she did and HER DOCTOR told her that everyone is getting cut down which was a big fat lie. as for the deaths for ODing on them they are only part of the reason why the DEA is doing this. once again it goes back to the ole might dollar. they are MONEY GREEDY. same goes for moonshine. there is nothing wrong with some good home brew but the government wants their cut as well. same goes for pills. a 30 roxie can sell for 20 and up to 35 or 40 dollars depending on how bad the junkie wants it. dont have to believe me just turn on the tv and watch it sometime. some either the persons insurance is paying for them or the customer doenst have insurance and has to pay for them out of pocket. the roxie 30s are almost 2 dollars a piece at the durgstore. the more u get the cheaper it is. then some people turn around and sell them and make alot of money. so if one sells 10 roxies at 30 each that $300. that is one week of working paycheck for me. the government which includes the DEA is putting a stop to this. they are just madd because they are not getting a cut of the money. it common sense it you think about it.
I don't see how the government is going to stop ODs. That is the families job and responsibility. I know a 48 year old man that is such a drunk and pill head, pisses blood and complains of his chest and liver, an yet says "im gonna die soon" an when tell him to stop he hates the idea and says he cant. Even though he is an in law I don't see why he is still alive, and everyone thinks he and everyone else when he is gone will be better off. We fear his drugs will get hubby's grandparents killed, and all he does is fight with them. It's a sad situation. But no one can help those that have given up on themselves. Like I told this guy. He gave up on himself a long time ago and now he's just slowly committing suicide.

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