You Are What U Eat-Eat the right Bread- you DUMMY!

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Multigrain Bread

No deception here, multigrain is what it claims to beóa variety of grains. The problem is, none of those grains may be whole. While itís easy to be fooled by some of the seeds that often sit on top of multi grain breads, the ingredient label will tell you the whole truth. If you donít see any 100-percent whole grains in the product and you donít see that trusting percentage on the front of the bread label, keep on walking

Pumpernickel

Made with coarse brown rye, pumpernickel can be the trickiest bread to decipher. While its extreme dark color may indicate a whole grain bread option, it still may be made with refined flours and in fact, most commercially made breads often are. If you see any other grain other than rye listed on the ingredients panel, itís probably not a great choice

Wheat Bread

Basically white bread dressed up in a pretty bow, wheat bread is white bread with molasses usually thrown in to fool you with some dark color. Wheat bread still contains refined wheat and chances are, youíre getting absolutely no whole grains in the product.

Rye Bread

White bread with rye seeds in it; finding one thatís 100-percent whole rye is possible, but not easy. Iíve found itís easier to get 100-percent rye bread at local bakeries that are willing to make it for you by request.

Whole Wheat White Bread

Whole-wheat white breads are made with a type of wheat called albino wheat. While red wheat (used to make whole wheat products) has that golden color that we imagine when we think of whole grain breads, albino is much lighter and less processed. At first, this may seem like a perfect choice for kids or white bread adult fans, but beware. While the majority of whole-wheat white breads do have whole grain wheat in the ingredient list, itís usually followed by refined wheat ingredients such as enriched of refined wheat flour.

Pumpernickel

Made with coarse brown rye, pumpernickel can be the trickiest bread to decipher. While its extreme dark color may indicate a whole grain bread option, it still may be made with refined flours and in fact, most commercially made breads often are. If you see any other grain other than rye listed on the ingredients panel, itís probably not a great choice.

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Gluten-free Bread
Gluten is huge right now and easier to find in even smaller grocery store chains. The percentage of individuals that are either suffering from celiac disease or who just claim to have intolerance to gluten is rising. The rules for bread choosing remain the same, however. Because gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, these breads will use other grains to make them free of gluten, Regardless of the grain, however, make sure itís 100 percent. For example, whole grain gluten free breads may be made with brown rice flour. If it is, look for options again that claim the important 100-percent claim.