Speeding violations stir police conce...

Speeding violations stir police concern - News

There are 276 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Mar 11, 2009, titled Speeding violations stir police concern - News. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

Honolulu police said an unusually high number of motorists have been cited for speeding because of stepped-up traffic enforcement due to a high number of traffic fatalities.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

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maku huhu

Honolulu, HI

#278 Mar 13, 2009
the truth wrote:
<quoted text>
Mike Unit, very good suggestion. Only thing is that the ones that whine and moan about the police are too afraid to voice themselves face-to-face. Easy to say all kinds of stuff behind the safety of the internet, but when it comes to a face-to-face encounter, they put their tail between their legs and run away. But again, very good suggestion.
It would be a very eye opening experience to go on a ride along with cop. But then again, most won't take this opportunity to be educated.
Loser!
the truth

Honolulu, HI

#279 Mar 13, 2009
maku huhu wrote:
<quoted text>
What a loser!
Ha Ha, is that the best you can do? What a clown.
whatson

Kahului, HI

#280 Mar 13, 2009
Sparx n Hulx wrote:
<quoted text>
Grow up WIMP!!! What a cry baby....I bet if you owned a Harley you'd be singing a different tune. Only REAL MEN ride Harleys.
uh huh, real FAT, UGLY men
alice

Honolulu, HI

#281 Mar 13, 2009
Mike Unit wrote:
A ride along with your local police department would really open your eyes to the inner workings of the police. On your ride along, you can voice your concerns and your suggestions on how the police can improve. Tell the officer face to face how he/she needs to do their job. Listen to their police radio and take notes on the calls they have to respond to. I was surprised that people actually call 911 for the stupidest complaints like "my neighbor's rubbish smells."
But what is most memorable was when I first sat in his police cruiser and he gave his instructions on how to use the police radio...he said, "If I get shot, killed, or become unconscious, this is how to use the radio to call for help." Then I asked him, how do you come to work knowing it might be your last day? He said he just wants to make the world safer for the kids.
So go on a ride along. It will really open your eyes and change your perspective.
i ride a lot of policemen hon. im surprised how they can multitask.
Cristalball

United States

#282 Mar 13, 2009
maku huhu wrote:
<quoted text>
Loser!
Yes, maku huhu is a loser. Agreed!
alice

Honolulu, HI

#283 Mar 13, 2009
Where are the speeders going that is so important...or more important than human life? Geesh.

Since: Sep 08

Honolulu

#284 Mar 13, 2009
They aren't speeding because they have someplace important to be. They are probably speeding becuse the law is essentially what you can get away with, not the law based on speed limit signs.
alice

Honolulu, HI

#285 Mar 13, 2009
Kaz may be right..few of the speeders I see look like they are even employed.

Since: Feb 09

Honolulu, HI

#286 Mar 13, 2009
Mike Unit wrote:
A ride along with your local police department would really open your eyes to the inner workings of the police. On your ride along, you can voice your concerns and your suggestions on how the police can improve. Tell the officer face to face how he/she needs to do their job. Listen to their police radio and take notes on the calls they have to respond to. I was surprised that people actually call 911 for the stupidest complaints like "my neighbor's rubbish smells."
But what is most memorable was when I first sat in his police cruiser and he gave his instructions on how to use the police radio...he said, "If I get shot, killed, or become unconscious, this is how to use the radio to call for help." Then I asked him, how do you come to work knowing it might be your last day? He said he just wants to make the world safer for the kids.
So go on a ride along. It will really open your eyes and change your perspective.
Mike, no one said that HPD officer's do not have a challenging job. We're discussing traffic enforcement as a concept with relation to enforcement and laws. Giving someone a speeding ticket for going 17 miles per hour in a 15 mph zone, seems like a kill fight, reactionary situation. The speed limits are too low and not consistent with the population and the amount of vehicles on the road. HPD is doing their job, per se, and has done a good job making Hawaii one of the safest places to live in the nation. Officer's disagree with Boise's approach, but he has proven to have the insight and vision to lower crime. In any society, you have, how should I put this, "challenged people," and will experience incidents like the recent one involving intoxication and vehicular homicide. This does not meant that HPD is not diong their job, they are. Societal adjustments have not been made to accomodate changes like increased population, for example. This is what we are discussing.
Cristalball

United States

#288 Mar 13, 2009
Copious, I agree with your statement, not that it means anything, but the problem starts when the topic turns into a pissing match with some people starting it off by blaming the police instead if the people that are speeding, where it should be. Why can't people understand that the speed limits are laws and when you speed, you are breaking the law. If you get caught, either pay the fine or fight it in court. Does it matter if the officer was positioned in a location that was not in plain view? Does that mean that the person was not speeding? Seems that way to some people. Why do people point fingers at everyone else but themselves? It's that me, me, me attitude that is corrupting the world today. Done take blame for your actions, just blame others. I wasn't speeding because the speed limit is too low. What the heck is that? Tell that one to the judge and see what his response is. Get found guilty anyway and still will blame the speed limit and the police for doing their jobs. Poor excuse of human beings and a waste of precious oxygen.
Copius231 wrote:
<quoted text>
Mike, no one said that HPD officer's do not have a challenging job. We're discussing traffic enforcement as a concept with relation to enforcement and laws. Giving someone a speeding ticket for going 17 miles per hour in a 15 mph zone, seems like a kill fight, reactionary situation. The speed limits are too low and not consistent with the population and the amount of vehicles on the road. HPD is doing their job, per se, and has done a good job making Hawaii one of the safest places to live in the nation. Officer's disagree with Boise's approach, but he has proven to have the insight and vision to lower crime. In any society, you have, how should I put this, "challenged people," and will experience incidents like the recent one involving intoxication and vehicular homicide. This does not meant that HPD is not diong their job, they are. Societal adjustments have not been made to accomodate changes like increased population, for example. This is what we are discussing.

Since: Feb 09

Honolulu, HI

#289 Mar 13, 2009
Cristalball wrote:
Copious, I agree with your statement, not that it means anything, but the problem starts when the topic turns into a **** match with some people starting it off by blaming the police instead if the people that are speeding, where it should be. Why can't people understand that the speed limits are laws and when you speed, you are breaking the law. If you get caught, either pay the fine or fight it in court. Does it matter if the officer was positioned in a location that was not in plain view? Does that mean that the person was not speeding? Seems that way to some people. Why do people point fingers at everyone else but themselves? It's that me, me, me attitude that is corrupting the world today. Done take blame for your actions, just blame others. I wasn't speeding because the speed limit is too low. What the heck is that? Tell that one to the judge and see what his response is. Get found guilty anyway and still will blame the speed limit and the police for doing their jobs. Poor excuse of human beings and a waste of precious oxygen.
<quoted text>
Exactly.
watchdog

Kailua, HI

#290 Mar 13, 2009
KAzman wrote:
<quoted text>So, What you want is a bunch of people calling 911 while driving (contrary to the city councils proposal to ban cell phone usage while driving)), or do you mean that they now must pull off to the side of the road and call 911 for a car tha wizzed past them doing execive speeds. When a car goes past you at that speed, you may not clearly get a license number. All you might get is a make model and color., By the time the call goes through, the car that zipped passed you may be a mile or two down the road or even exited freeway or turned off the highways. Or even better as you are suggesting, that they follow the speeder's to get the license plate, possibly endangering their own lives. Be more realistic in your suggestions.
Good point. Who will be the judge if the call was an 'emergency'? Will they cite the caller? They will have your ID. Will everyone stop calling in dangerous drivers they see on the road? If so, wonder what ''punishment' the good guy will get?

Seems the laws protect the bad and to heck with the good.

I also agree with a previous post, if the speeder has 6 prior speeding tickets, he should not be in possession of his car.
watchdog

Kailua, HI

#291 Mar 13, 2009
Mike Unit wrote:
A ride along with your local police department would really open your eyes to the inner workings of the police. On your ride along, you can voice your concerns and your suggestions on how the police can improve. Tell the officer face to face how he/she needs to do their job. Listen to their police radio and take notes on the calls they have to respond to. I was surprised that people actually call 911 for the stupidest complaints like "my neighbor's rubbish smells."
But what is most memorable was when I first sat in his police cruiser and he gave his instructions on how to use the police radio...he said, "If I get shot, killed, or become unconscious, this is how to use the radio to call for help." Then I asked him, how do you come to work knowing it might be your last day? He said he just wants to make the world safer for the kids.
So go on a ride along. It will really open your eyes and change your perspective.
1. Sometimes I have needed to call HPD and wished they had a line that was not an emergency line, like for your "neighbors garbage smells" but the operator will only put you on the line with all the other emergency calls.

2. The ride- a- long officer telling you how to use the phone in case he dies.....really made me think about the dangers the officers face every minute of every day. Thank you to the officers who are trying to make a difference! Wish your leadership would address your grievances so you would be able to do your job the way you know it should be done.
Mrs Halliday

Pensacola, FL

#292 Mar 8, 2012
Go figure wrote:
<quoted text>
lol...2nd "safest" place to live? Perhaps you've must've been smoking some of that pakalolo or some meth...2nd safest state if you're considering the category of "stolen diapers" perhaps.
Some places have already done that and it doesn't help if the officers are unwilling to write the ticket
leeward lolo

Honolulu, HI

#293 Mar 8, 2012
Legal Police wrote:
Yesterday, A motorcycle passed me on H3, High Handlebars, local male rider, no helmet, swerving in and out of traffic like an idiot at speeds over 100 MPH. Don't you think part of the problem is HPD's targeting of the average citizen and their 10 miles over habit while the speedsters evade all. When we read about this guy I saw yesterday will HPD introduce yet another program to tag more average citizens?
Nothing fixed yet three years later. Still a speed trap where signs clearly say 25 mph DURING SCHOOL HOURS.
They hide and issue citations for 35 mph even during school vacations.
But they drive 50 mph going to lunch. lol
Stumpy

Honolulu, HI

#294 Mar 9, 2012
I read that 20% of the cars on the road on Oahu are uninsured and unregistered. When I asked our rep why they weren't towed when stopped by the police her response was, "They are still voters, and their families vote too." Typical Hawaii democrap answer.,

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