Unalienable rights vs Inalienable rights

Unalienable rights vs Inalienable rights

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OutOfTheMatrix

Springdale, AR

#1 Feb 9, 2013
Unalienable rights

The Declaration of Independence says our rights are "unalienable". Jefferson knew exactly what he was doing when he said that our rights are "unalienable". He could have used the word "inalienable" but he didn't. "Unalienable" rights are rights that CANNOT under any circumstances be alienated. Under the definition for "Unalienable rights", most law dictionaries say to see "Inalienable rights". The reason that our rights are "unalienable" is because government officials have an oath of office, and it would be "perjury of oath" if they were to violate our rights.

That is exactly why the government attorneys in many cases appear and say that there was no contract - it is a nullity - it doesn't exist.

Inalienable rights

Inalienable rights are rights that can be alienated by virtue of some contract. This is what the US Congress perjurers did with their Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act. The US Congress perjurers want you to think that the government has no responsibility towards you so they can help out their owners. It is still perjury of oath.

Also, BAR members (foreign agents of the Crown) are usually the authors of law dictionaries, which is why that they conveniently overlook the difference between unalienable rights and inalienable rights.

Know the difference...Know your rights.

Judged:

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USA INC

Springdale, AR

#2 Feb 10, 2013
It is obvious that most people have become used to being slaves.

They care not of basic truths or freedom.

They have chosen to remain stupid.

After reading the above they are no longer ignorant.

The only benefit of this is when you ask, "Who is responsible for the acts and actions of a slave?"

The answer would be, "The slave master."

Enjoy your slavery.
USA INC

Springdale, AR

#3 Feb 10, 2013
OutOfTheMatrix wrote:
Unalienable rights
The Declaration of Independence says our rights are "unalienable". Jefferson knew exactly what he was doing when he said that our rights are "unalienable". He could have used the word "inalienable" but he didn't. "Unalienable" rights are rights that CANNOT under any circumstances be alienated. Under the definition for "Unalienable rights", most law dictionaries say to see "Inalienable rights". The reason that our rights are "unalienable" is because government officials have an oath of office, and it would be "perjury of oath" if they were to violate our rights.
That is exactly why the government attorneys in many cases appear and say that there was no contract - it is a nullity - it doesn't exist.
Inalienable rights
Inalienable rights are rights that can be alienated by virtue of some contract. This is what the US Congress perjurers did with their Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act. The US Congress perjurers want you to think that the government has no responsibility towards you so they can help out their owners. It is still perjury of oath.
Also, BAR members (foreign agents of the Crown) are usually the authors of law dictionaries, which is why that they conveniently overlook the difference between unalienable rights and inalienable rights.
Know the difference...Know your rights.
Only Leftist "Judge it"'s?

What gives?
guest

Springdale, AR

#4 Feb 10, 2013
Leftists can only reply to threads they agree with or forward their agenda.

All others are irrelevant.
See

Springdale, AR

#5 Feb 11, 2013
What I mean.
demoCraps hate Christians

Providence, UT

#6 Feb 11, 2013
CBS

Democrat members of the Colorado Senate have told Christians there’s no place in society for them, warning them to “get thee to a nunnery” for their biblically based beliefs that homosexuality is a sin.

“What to say to those who claim that religion requires them to discriminate? I tell you what I’d say:‘Get thee to a nunnery, and live there then. Go live a monastic life, away from modern society, away from people you can’t see as equals to yourself,’” said homosexual state Sen. Pat Steadman of Denver. He was advocating for a “civil unions” bill in Colorado that skirts the state’s constitutional definition of marriage as being between one man and one woman. The bill essentially provides the benefits of marriage to those who choose the homosexual lifestyle.

The bill died in a Republican-controlled House last year, but this year, with Democrats in the majority in both houses, it is expected to be approved – but with a difference.

Steadman has removed last year’s provision that would have allowed business owners of faith to make decisions on how they would provide their own services.

Steadman expressed absolutely no tolerance for those of faith.

He also said the issue of the mandatory recognition by all of homosexuality was why he ran for public office.

“It’s very rewarding to know something I worked on for many years is this close to becoming reality,” he told the local CBS affiliate.

“Go some place and be as judgmental as you like, go inside your church, establish separate water fountains if you like. But don’t tell me that your free exercise of religion requires the state of Colorado to establish separate water fountains,” he said, according to a report on Denver’s KDVR television.

Video of his statement has been posted online by the station.

KDVR reported that Sen. Kent Lambert, R-Colorado Springs, pointed out the very intolerance being exhibited.

“Telling us get thee to a nunnery?” the station reported he said.“That doesn’t sound very inclusive to me.”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#7 Feb 11, 2013
In Jefferson's time people like Rupert Murdock had not yet divided America into Conservative and Liberal, red and blue. In those days we had the Patriots verses the British and the American who were loyal to the king called Tory or Loyalist.

Today the conservatives are the ones who want status quo, AKA Loyalist, the same old thing we had in the past like giant segments of our society without the basic rights that most of us take for granted.

In Jefferson's day a large majority of people could not do simple things like go outside after dark, gather in groups of three or more, leave their owner’s property without a written pass, own weapons or learn to read or write.

Women folk were so simple that they did not have the same level of intelligences as men so they were not allowed to vote.

Progression- gradual advancement: a gradual change or advancement from one state to another.

Liberal- progressive politically or socially: favoring gradual reform, especially political reforms that extend democracy, distribute wealth more evenly, and protect the personal freedom of the individual.

I must be a progressive liberal because I think America is much improved and getting better all the time.
WeHaveBeen Deceived

Springdale, AR

#9 Feb 11, 2013
orval wrote:
<quoted text>
The words mean EXACTLY the same thing, and are used interchangably.
you, my friend are full of shit.
Either you can't read or, you have a comprehension problem.

I respectfully suggest that you my friend, are full of Kah-Kah.

Enjoy your slavery.
Guest

Rogers, AR

#10 Feb 11, 2013
WeHaveBeen Deceived wrote:
<quoted text>
Either you can't read or, you have a comprehension problem.
I respectfully suggest that you my friend, are full of Kah-Kah.
Enjoy your slavery.
Much as 99.9999% of use feel about your Mindless Divile.
OutOfTheMatrix

Springdale, AR

#11 Feb 11, 2013
Guest wrote:
<quoted text>Much as 99.9999% of use feel about your Mindless Divile.
Actually, 97% have no clue of the truth. I feel sorry for you, if you are one of them.
guEst

Springdale, AR

#12 Feb 13, 2013
orval wrote:
<quoted text>
The words mean EXACTLY the same thing, and are used interchangably.
you, my friend are full of shit.
You couldn't be further from the truth.

Stay ignorant my friend, that sheep's hide looks good on you.
NeWGuEsty

Cleveland, OH

#13 Aug 23, 2013
Thought it best to to post the definitions from a source more than likely to be used against you while depriving you of those precious rights. I find it really odd that there is no definition for 'Unalienable rights' while it is for 'Inalienable rights' yet both words are defined, and the phrase 'Inalienable rights' and word 'inalienable' is right there with the definition of 'unalienable'. It's written like the IRC. If courts follow the rule of stare decisis, then which defintion do you think they will use agianst you while you are tyring to argue about rights that cannot be taken away? Can you Consent to loose them or not? You might think that you can use them interchangably, but I would think twice. I will say I am a frim believer in the use of the word 'Unalienable'.

Blacks Law 5th pg 1366:

unalienable - Inalienable; incapable of being aliened, that is sold and transferred; Inalienable rights - Rights which can never be abridged because they are so fundamental.

Blacks Law 5th pg 683:

inalienable - Not subject to alienation; the characteristic of those things which cannot be bought or sold or transferred from one person to another, such as rivers and public highways, and certain personal rights e.g liberty.

Blacks Law 5th pg 683 just under that last one:

Inalienable rights - Rights which are not capable of being transferred without the consent of the one possesing such rights. Morrison v. State. Mo.App., 252 S.W.2d 97, 101
NowUKnow

Springdale, AR

#14 Aug 23, 2013
NeWGuEsty wrote:
Thought it best to to post the definitions from a source more than likely to be used against you while depriving you of those precious rights. I find it really odd that there is no definition for 'Unalienable rights' while it is for 'Inalienable rights' yet both words are defined, and the phrase 'Inalienable rights' and word 'inalienable' is right there with the definition of 'unalienable'. It's written like the IRC. If courts follow the rule of stare decisis, then which defintion do you think they will use agianst you while you are tyring to argue about rights that cannot be taken away? Can you Consent to loose them or not? You might think that you can use them interchangably, but I would think twice. I will say I am a frim believer in the use of the word 'Unalienable'.
Blacks Law 5th pg 1366:
unalienable - Inalienable; incapable of being aliened, that is sold and transferred; Inalienable rights - Rights which can never be abridged because they are so fundamental.
Blacks Law 5th pg 683:
inalienable - Not subject to alienation; the characteristic of those things which cannot be bought or sold or transferred from one person to another, such as rivers and public highways, and certain personal rights e.g liberty.
Blacks Law 5th pg 683 just under that last one:
Inalienable rights - Rights which are not capable of being transferred without the consent of the one possesing such rights. Morrison v. State. Mo.App., 252 S.W.2d 97, 101
Well, there you have it.
DontLeanForward

Springdale, AR

#15 Aug 24, 2013
The "Leftist" Judge-it's prove their ignorance.

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#16 Aug 24, 2013
Merriam Webster Dictionary:

Inalienable Rights:incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred

Unalienable rights : Impossible to take away or give up : inalienable

You ignorant rsacists should consult your dictionary

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#17 Aug 24, 2013
The question is often asked, "Is the word in the Declaration of Independence unalienable or is it inalienable?"

The final version of the Declaration uses the word "unalienable." Some earlier drafts used the word "inalienable," which is the term our modern dictionaries prefer. The two words mean precisely the same thing.

According to The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style from Houghton Mifflin Company:

The unalienable rights that are mentioned in the Declaration of Independence could just as well have been inalienable, which means the same thing. Inalienable or unalienable refers to that which cannot be given away or taken away.
guest

Ridgedale, MO

#18 Aug 25, 2013
Because the definition of words change over time (e.g. gay), in order to understand the meaning of the terms used in the Constitution, we must understand them as they were defined during the period in which it was written.

The U.S. Supreme Court relies on two dictionaries for such purposes. One is Bouvier’s Law Dictionary, the other is Webster’s 1828 Dictionary.

As we can see, the words have basically the same meaning and are often used interchangeably:

***
Bouvier’s Law Dictionary

INALIENABLE. This word is applied to those things, the property of which cannot be lawfully transferred from one person to another. Public highways and rivers are of this kind; there are also many rights which are inalienable, as the rights of liberty, or of speech.

UNALIENABLE. The state of a thing or right which cannot be sold.
2. Things which are not in commerce, as public roads, are in their nature unalienable. Some things are unalienable, in consequence of particular provisions in the law forbidding their sale or transfer, as pensions granted by the government. The natural rights of life and liberty are unalienable.

***
Webster’s 1828

INA''LIENABLE, a.[L. alieno, alienus.]
Unalienable; that cannot be legally or justly alienated or transferred to another. The dominions of a king are inalienable. All men have certain natural rights which are inalienable. The estate of a minor is inalienable, without a reservation of the right of redemption, or the authority of the legislature.

UNA''LIENABLE, a. Not alienable; that cannot be alienated; that may not be transferred; as unalienable rights.

Class dismissed.
CC Ryder

Jonesboro, AR

#19 Aug 25, 2013
What's worse, ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#20 Aug 25, 2013
CC Ryder wrote:
What's worse, ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.
I think you're more the former.

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#21 Aug 25, 2013
OutOfTheMatrix wrote:
Unalienable rights
The Declaration of Independence says our rights are "unalienable". Jefferson knew exactly what he was doing when he said that our rights are "unalienable". He could have used the word "inalienable" but he didn't. "Unalienable" rights are rights that CANNOT under any circumstances be alienated. Under the definition for "Unalienable rights", most law dictionaries say to see "Inalienable rights". The reason that our rights are "unalienable" is because government officials have an oath of office, and it would be "perjury of oath" if they were to violate our rights.
That is exactly why the government attorneys in many cases appear and say that there was no contract - it is a nullity - it doesn't exist.
Inalienable rights
Inalienable rights are rights that can be alienated by virtue of some contract. This is what the US Congress perjurers did with their Foreign Sovereign Immunity Act. The US Congress perjurers want you to think that the government has no responsibility towards you so they can help out their owners. It is still perjury of oath.
Also, BAR members (foreign agents of the Crown) are usually the authors of law dictionaries, which is why that they conveniently overlook the difference between unalienable rights and inalienable rights.
Know the difference...Know your rights.
I know you posted this long ago, but if you read this , are you fair enough to admit that you are totally incorrect after reading
all the posts showing that the two words have the same meaning?

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