Will a Methadone Clinic becoming to JC
Concerned

AOL

#66 Mar 19, 2013
Cheese Puff Daddy wrote:
<quoted text>
It would be great if JC Transit would make it a stop on their route. At least it would keep a lot of them off the roads.
I think that's an excellant idea.
Concerned

AOL

#67 Mar 19, 2013
Uncle Wayne wrote:
I know a man who had a very successful flooring bus, in the seventies. He got so bad on heroin that he lost it all.
He now is on Methadone still, he has no intention to get off of it.
He has severe pain in his back from working on flooring since he as 12 and injuries from a severe motercycle crash
It's a better life, spending everyday searching for a fix is hell.
There is no way you can hold a job
No one want's to be a junkie.
I have seen many evil things being said about addicts on this forum.
I hope your kids or Grand kids don't ever become one, they will have there chance.
With methadone or suboxon you don't have to live with the anxiety of wondering where your next fix is coming from and you can work and have a normal life.
I just think it is easier when you have a crutch, sort of like when you break your leg.
Addiction is a terrible disease, it is incurable.
Why don't we treat these people like they have cancer for a Minuit?
No one starts out wanting to be an addict.
Most of the people running these clinics are ex addicts themselves
For the ones that truly need it and use it correctly it can be a life saver.

But many do not use it as intended or do not take it correctly.
The concern isn't about the people that will be using it correctly, the concern is over the ones that will be using the clinic as their local afforadble drug dealer - and there is concern over issues with how the clinic will operate. How will the clinic owners and staff address these concerns - IF they even plan to address them at all
Concerned

AOL

#68 Mar 19, 2013
I think the main concern that has been expressed here is one I myself brought up ...
No one wants to see a clinic like the one in Knoxville come to JC.
That's not saying that no one wants a clinic in JC at all.
I think almost everyone agrees there is a need, but we do not want to see or be forced to deal with the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community.

A clinic that is operated and run under strict medical guidelines; and one that is staffed with medical professionals that specialize in this area, is more likely to ease the concerns and worries of the community.

Also,I think having a public forum with the owners, operators and staff present to answer questions and concerns from the community should be held.
City and County leaders should also be present and should require that the clinic have plans in place to address any major issues BEFORE the clinic opens for business.
Just the facts

Greer, SC

#70 Mar 25, 2013
I have to comment after reading all these crazy stories. I have first hand knowledge of the Knoxville clinic. If you met me on the street you would think I was a stand up citizen, hard worker, and dedicated parent. But my family knows how bad I used to be...before methadone. There is good and bad with everything in this world and clinics are no different. I can tell you that in Knoxville you now have to show documents that you have attempted rehab at least twice before starting methadone. You are required to submit to frequent urine test (randomly observed) and you are required to see a counselor monthly, if you do get take homes you are called in randomly to have your medicine counted. I have never been given a heads up notice that one of these is coming. There will always be someone trying to outsmart the system, but the clinic makes it harder and harder to get away with. All I can say is the clinic in Knoxville saved my life. I pay my bills on time, I never miss work, I go to church every Sunday. Be careful when you judge...I could be the person next to you and you would NEVER know!
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R

Kodak, TN

#72 Mar 26, 2013
Concerned wrote:
I think the main concern that has been expressed here is one I myself brought up ...
No one wants to see a clinic like the one in Knoxville come to JC.
That's not saying that no one wants a clinic in JC at all.
I think almost everyone agrees there is a need, but we do not want to see or be forced to deal with the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community.
A clinic that is operated and run under strict medical guidelines; and one that is staffed with medical professionals that specialize in this area, is more likely to ease the concerns and worries of the community.
Also,I think having a public forum with the owners, operators and staff present to answer questions and concerns from the community should be held.
City and County leaders should also be present and should require that the clinic have plans in place to address any major issues BEFORE the clinic opens for business.
If I may ask...
What problems are you referring to, and which Knoxville clinic are you talking about? Both MMT Clinics in Knoxville, TN are located in very bad parts of town (which is where they were forced as a result of zoning, etc.)... Furthermore, the very large corporate chain (Behavioral Health Group - BHG - www.bhgrecovery.com ) that owns both of the Knoxville, TN clinics is not who is proposing to open/operate the clinic in Johnson City... There is no comparison or anything that would indicate that the proposed Johnson City, TN clinic would cause "the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community" (of which I am still not sure what is being referred to).

But furthermore and more importantly that that:
It's time we start paying attention to science & facts by listening to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institutes of Drug Addiction (NIDA), American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependency (AATOD), American Psychological Association (APA), National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and COUNTLESS other medical and professional organizations who have been extremely clear in their evidence-based conclusions that Medication-Assisted Treatment, specifically Methadone Maintenance Treatment, is the opioid addicted's best hope for the restoration of a quality life & health as the most effective treatment option for opioid addiction currently available and STOP giving so much credence to misinformation, myths, propaganda & stigma as in which nearly all of the opposition to this clinic is based.

As Robert Newman, MD, MPH stated,
"Of course, all forms of treatment that offer help and hope should be supported to the greatest extent possible, whether they are abstinence-based or utilize medication, residential or outpatient, short-term or extending for months or years. However, cost, accessibility and affordability put most non-methadone treatment out of the reach of the vast majority of opiate-dependent individuals. Accordingly, rejecting maintenance treatment means abandonment for most who want and could benefit greatly from help. And abandonment, in turn, not only can mean a death sentence for those dependent on drugs, but is a policy whose costs are borne by every member of the community.
It’s time we accept the reality that “just say no” is not an effective policy in dealing with medical and social problems."

In solidarity with truth, recovery & the best hope for the afflicted,

Zac Talbott, Director & Patient Advocate
National Alliance for Medication Assisted Recovery
NAMA-Recovery of Tennessee
[email protected]

http://www.methadone.org/
http://www.facebook.com/NAMARecoveryTN

"Together we CAN make a difference!"
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R

Kodak, TN

#73 Mar 26, 2013
Concerned wrote:
I think the main concern that has been expressed here is one I myself brought up ...
No one wants to see a clinic like the one in Knoxville come to JC.
That's not saying that no one wants a clinic in JC at all.
I think almost everyone agrees there is a need, but we do not want to see or be forced to deal with the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community.
A clinic that is operated and run under strict medical guidelines; and one that is staffed with medical professionals that specialize in this area, is more likely to ease the concerns and worries of the community.
Also,I think having a public forum with the owners, operators and staff present to answer questions and concerns from the community should be held.
City and County leaders should also be present and should require that the clinic have plans in place to address any major issues BEFORE the clinic opens for business.
If I may ask...
What problems are you referring to, and which Knoxville clinic are you talking about? Both MMT Clinics in Knoxville, TN are located in very bad parts of town (which is where they were forced as a result of zoning, etc.)... Furthermore, the very large corporate chain (Behavioral Health Group - BHG - www.bhgrecovery.com ) that owns both of the Knoxville, TN clinics is not who is proposing to open/operate the clinic in Johnson City... There is no comparison or anything that would indicate that the proposed Johnson City, TN clinic would cause "the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community" (of which I am still not sure what is being referred to).

But furthermore and more importantly that that:
It's time we start paying attention to science & facts by listening to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institutes of Drug Addiction (NIDA), American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependency (AATOD), American Psychological Association (APA), National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and COUNTLESS other medical and professional organizations who have been extremely clear in their evidence-based conclusions that Medication-Assisted Treatment, specifically Methadone Maintenance Treatment, is the opioid addicted's best hope for the restoration of a quality life & health as the most effective treatment option for opioid addiction currently available and STOP giving so much credence to misinformation, myths, propaganda & stigma as in which nearly all of the opposition to this clinic is based.

As Robert Newman, MD, MPH stated,
"Of course, all forms of treatment that offer help and hope should be supported to the greatest extent possible, whether they are abstinence-based or utilize medication, residential or outpatient, short-term or extending for months or years. However, cost, accessibility and affordability put most non-methadone treatment out of the reach of the vast majority of opiate-dependent individuals. Accordingly, rejecting maintenance treatment means abandonment for most who want and could benefit greatly from help. And abandonment, in turn, not only can mean a death sentence for those dependent on drugs, but is a policy whose costs are borne by every member of the community.

It’s time we accept the reality that “just say no” is not an effective policy in dealing with medical and social problems."

In solidarity with truth & recovery,
Zac Talbott, Director & Patient Advocate
National Alliance for Medication Assisted Recovery
NAMA-Recovery of Tennessee
[email protected]

http://www.methadone.org/
http://www.facebook.com/NAMARecoveryTN

"Together we CAN make a difference!"
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R

Kodak, TN

#74 Mar 26, 2013
Concerned wrote:
I think the main concern that has been expressed here is one I myself brought up ...
No one wants to see a clinic like the one in Knoxville come to JC.
That's not saying that no one wants a clinic in JC at all.
I think almost everyone agrees there is a need, but we do not want to see or be forced to deal with the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community.
A clinic that is operated and run under strict medical guidelines; and one that is staffed with medical professionals that specialize in this area, is more likely to ease the concerns and worries of the community.
Also,I think having a public forum with the owners, operators and staff present to answer questions and concerns from the community should be held.
City and County leaders should also be present and should require that the clinic have plans in place to address any major issues BEFORE the clinic opens for business.
If I may ask...
What problems are you referring to, and which Knoxville clinic are you talking about? Both MMT Clinics in Knoxville, TN are located in very bad parts of town (which is where they were forced as a result of zoning, etc.)... Furthermore, the very large corporate chain (Behavioral Health Group - BHG) that owns both of the Knoxville, TN clinics is not who is proposing to open/operate the clinic in Johnson City... There is no comparison or anything that would indicate that the proposed Johnson City, TN clinic would cause "the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community" (of which I am still not sure what is being referred to).

But furthermore and more importantly that that:
It's time we start paying attention to science & facts by listening to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institutes of Drug Addiction (NIDA), American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependency (AATOD), American Psychological Association (APA), National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and COUNTLESS other medical and professional organizations who have been extremely clear in their evidence-based conclusions that Medication-Assisted Treatment, specifically Methadone Maintenance Treatment, is the opioid addicted's best hope for the restoration of a quality life & health as the most effective treatment option for opioid addiction currently available and STOP giving so much credence to misinformation, myths, propaganda & stigma as in which nearly all of the opposition to this clinic is based.

As Robert Newman, MD, MPH stated,
"Of course, all forms of treatment that offer help and hope should be supported to the greatest extent possible, whether they are abstinence-based or utilize medication, residential or outpatient, short-term or extending for months or years. However, cost, accessibility and affordability put most non-methadone treatment out of the reach of the vast majority of opiate-dependent individuals. Accordingly, rejecting maintenance treatment means abandonment for most who want and could benefit greatly from help. And abandonment, in turn, not only can mean a death sentence for those dependent on drugs, but is a policy whose costs are borne by every member of the community.

It’s time we accept the reality that “just say no” is not an effective policy in dealing with medical and social problems."

In solidarity with truth, recovery & the best hope for the afflicted,
Zac Talbott, Director & Patient Advocate
National Alliance for Medication Assisted Recovery
NAMA-Recovery of Tennessee

"Together we CAN make a difference!"
Help

Bluff City, TN

#75 Mar 26, 2013
Cheese Puff Daddy wrote:
<quoted text>
Yep, the folks I knew that were on it totaled 2 cars in 6 months on 26. Lucky they didn't kill themselves or somebody. The guy was a good worker, on breaks he would usually dose off but after we woke em up he'd go back to work like nothing had happened. Had the clinic been in JC he coulda taken a bus. Some of the folks that go to Asheville will have a designated driver and take a van and everybody chips in on gas.
And yes, they're privately owned and are huge money makers. I believe he paid $50 a week for his doses. His black market habit costed $100+ a DAY.. It's a big give and take situation. Who do you think is more likely to steal? The guy paying $50 a week with a job or the guy paying out $700 a week that's unemployed because his life revolves around hustling for black market opiates/opioids?
For everybody saying they do nothing to cure the addiction, just making their patients able to support their addiction and lead some what normal lives has to be a step in the right direction. Being able to provide for their families is huge in getting their lives back.
Finally somebody who knows what they're talking about. I have 40 days of suboxone for under $70. I won't need or want anything. I'll never be high and ill never be a danger. I didn't get onmopitaes own purpose. I just want off....they still make a money racket out of it....
Help

Bluff City, TN

#76 Mar 26, 2013
Cheese Puff Daddy wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm pretty sure the dosage is upped as the patients tolerance to the drug increases.
But not suboxone. It's so easy to reduce. I was on 8 and I'm down to 2 and I have gone a week one one...my next step is to do one every other day and then quit ...problem solved,....but they want their $13 billion that they make every year
Carmen Methadone Advocate

United States

#77 Mar 26, 2013
My first job 40 years ago was in a halfway house where we used methadone to wean patients from heroin and other pain killers. In these past years I have seen literally thousands of lives saved by methadone. I have seen lives restored; families restored; and people returned to sanity. There are medications for every medical and behavioral necessity. It is pointless for people to suffer when there are good medications available to treat addiction. A methadone clinic will make your community healthier; reduce crime and save lives. Give people a chance.
okk

Johnson City, TN

#78 Mar 26, 2013
Carmen Methadone Advocate wrote:
My first job 40 years ago was in a halfway house where we used methadone to wean patients from heroin and other pain killers. In these past years I have seen literally thousands of lives saved by methadone. I have seen lives restored; families restored; and people returned to sanity. There are medications for every medical and behavioral necessity. It is pointless for people to suffer when there are good medications available to treat addiction. A methadone clinic will make your community healthier; reduce crime and save lives. Give people a chance.
I agree that it may work for a FEW, but I think the negative out weighs the positive. These addicts have to want to get help, but what the methadone clinics provide is an easy high. It's ridiculous!
Concerned

AOL

#81 Apr 1, 2013
Just the facts wrote:
I have to comment after reading all these crazy stories. I have first hand knowledge of the Knoxville clinic. If you met me on the street you would think I was a stand up citizen, hard worker, and dedicated parent. But my family knows how bad I used to be...before methadone. There is good and bad with everything in this world and clinics are no different. I can tell you that in Knoxville you now have to show documents that you have attempted rehab at least twice before starting methadone. You are required to submit to frequent urine test (randomly observed) and you are required to see a counselor monthly, if you do get take homes you are called in randomly to have your medicine counted. I have never been given a heads up notice that one of these is coming. There will always be someone trying to outsmart the system, but the clinic makes it harder and harder to get away with. All I can say is the clinic in Knoxville saved my life. I pay my bills on time, I never miss work, I go to church every Sunday. Be careful when you judge...I could be the person next to you and you would NEVER know!
Your story is a success story, but it is only one example, those other stories you referred to as being "crazy" tell a different story.

Not every person will succeed, nor will every clinic be the same.

Just as you spoke of your own person experience, which had and is having a good outcome; others here have spoken of their experiences (either directly or through knowing someone on methadone) and their experiences unfortunately have not paralleled your own.

Best wishes for your continued success.
Concerned

AOL

#82 Apr 1, 2013
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R wrote:
<quoted text>
If I may ask...
What problems are you referring to, and which Knoxville clinic are you talking about? Both MMT Clinics in Knoxville, TN are located in very bad parts of town (which is where they were forced as a result of zoning, etc.)... Furthermore, the very large corporate chain (Behavioral Health Group - BHG) that owns both of the Knoxville, TN clinics is not who is proposing to open/operate the clinic in Johnson City... There is no comparison or anything that would indicate that the proposed Johnson City, TN clinic would cause "the same problems that the clinic in Knoxville brought to that community" (of which I am still not sure what is being referred to).
If you read the past posts you can see exactly which problems are being referred to. These are legitimate concerns and issues that could effect not only the surrounding community but also the patients themselves.
But furthermore and more importantly that that:
It's time we start paying attention to science & facts by listening to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institutes of Drug Addiction (NIDA), American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependency (AATOD), American Psychological Association (APA), National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and COUNTLESS other medical and professional organizations who have been extremely clear in their evidence-based conclusions that Medication-Assisted Treatment, specifically Methadone Maintenance Treatment, is the opioid addicted's best hope for the restoration of a quality life & health as the most effective treatment option for opioid addiction currently available and STOP giving so much credence to misinformation, myths, propaganda & stigma as in which nearly all of the opposition to this clinic is based.
As Robert Newman, MD, MPH stated,
"Of course, all forms of treatment that offer help and hope should be supported to the greatest extent possible, whether they are abstinence-based or utilize medication, residential or outpatient, short-term or extending for months or years. However, cost, accessibility and affordability put most non-methadone treatment out of the reach of the vast majority of opiate-dependent individuals. Accordingly, rejecting maintenance treatment means abandonment for most who want and could benefit greatly from help. And abandonment, in turn, not only can mean a death sentence for those dependent on drugs, but is a policy whose costs are borne by every member of the community.
It’s time we accept the reality that “just say no” is not an effective policy in dealing with medical and social problems."
In solidarity with truth, recovery & the best hope for the afflicted,
Zac Talbott, Director & Patient Advocate
National Alliance for Medication Assisted Recovery
NAMA-Recovery of Tennessee
"Together we CAN make a difference!"
If you read the past posts you can see exactly which problems are being referred to.
These are legitimate concerns and issues that could effect not only the surrounding community but also the patients themselves.

If you notice, concern for both sides have been expressed.
Concerned

AOL

#83 Apr 1, 2013
Help wrote:
<quoted text>
But not suboxone. It's so easy to reduce. I was on 8 and I'm down to 2 and I have gone a week one one...my next step is to do one every other day and then quit ...problem solved,....but they want their $13 billion that they make every year
My nephew was told (by a medical professional) that it is a process that takes time and must be taken step by step for the best hope of success.

I wish you the very best for a bright and healthy future.
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R

Kodak, TN

#84 Apr 1, 2013
Concerned wrote:
<quoted text>
If you read the past posts you can see exactly which problems are being referred to.
These are legitimate concerns and issues that could effect not only the surrounding community but also the patients themselves.
If you notice, concern for both sides have been expressed.
No, there has not been any citations of specific problems; Only generalized myths & assumptions. It is itself telling that someone who claims a family member who had "only ever been a pot smoker," and had never been addicted to or a misuser of any other drugs, was admitted to a Methadone Maintenance Treatment clinic at all. Either the family member is lying out of fear of judgement or the generalized stigma that many of these comments continue to perpetuate or one must wonder if the entire "account" of an individual "trading his pot addiction for a methadone addiction" has any basis in reality at all. An individual *must*(under strict federal and state guidelines) provide evidence of a minimum of 1 year of opioid addiction in addition to having opioids (whether heroin or prescription analgesic opioids or both) present and detectable in their system prior to being admitted into an Opioid Treatment Program that employs Medication-Assisted Treatment (whether methadone or buprenorphine). Both of the BHG Knoxville Medical Clinics follow these guidelines and requirements, as their records and documentation are subject to frequent and thorough audits and reviews by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and the Tennessee state medication-assisted treatment authority. This is only one example of the highly sensationalized myths that are prevalent throughout this feed. If I might, once again, recommend that we note what has been voiced for many years by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, as well as the Institute of Medicine, WHO, and countless governmental, clinical and academic authorities throughout the world: Opioid addiction is a chronic medical disorder that can be treated effectively with a combination of medication AND psychosocial services, as are employed under federal guidelines and regulations by Opioid Treatment Programs ("methadone clinics").

An important development was the 1997 publication of recommendations by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus panel on effective medical treatment of opioid addiction. After hearing from experts and the public and examining the literature, the panel concluded that "[opioid addiction] is a medical disorder that can be effectively treated with significant benefits for the patient and society" (National Institutes of Health 1997b, p. 18). That panel explicitly rejected the notion "that [addiction] is self-induced or a failure of willpower and that efforts to treat it inevitably fail" (p. 18). It called for "a commitment to offer effective treatment for [opioid addiction] to all who need it" (p. 2). The panel also called for Federal and State efforts to reduce the stigma attached to Methadone Maintenance Treatment and to *expand* Methadone Maintenance Treatment through increased funding, less restrictive regulation, and efforts to make treatment AVAILABLE IN ALL COMMUNITIES (p. 24).

The scientific medical research, facts & data are clear. The fact that crime rates decrease in communities when Methadone Treatment programs open is documented. It is accepted by the medical community that Methadone Maintenance Treatment is the *most* effective modality for the treatment of opioid addiction. Any opposition to this clinic is based in misinformation and stigma alone and absent any logic or factual considerations. I encourage all who are serious to visit the links I have posted previously in this feed.

In sincerity,
Zac Talbott, Director
NAMA-Recovery of TN
Concerned

AOL

#85 Apr 3, 2013
Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R
wrote:
"No, there has not been any citations of specific problems; Only generalized myths & assumptions.
An individual *must*(under strict federal and state guidelines) provide evidence of a minimum of 1 year of opioid addiction in addition to having opioids (whether heroin or prescription analgesic opioids or both) present and detectable in their system prior to being admitted into an Opioid Treatment Program that employs Medication-Assisted Treatment (whether methadone or buprenorphine). Both of the BHG Knoxville Medical Clinics follow these guidelines and requirements, as their records and documentation are subject to frequent and thorough audits and reviews by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and the Tennessee state medication-assisted treatment authority. "

**** Medical doctors, hospitals and medical clinics are also strongly regulated, yet as the headlines often report - sometimes they violate the guidelines and sometimes they get away with it for years. So simply stating that a clinic is regulated is not evidence that it is following all the guidelines every time.****

"The scientific medical research, facts & data are clear. The fact that crime rates decrease in communities when Methadone Treatment programs open is documented. It is accepted by the medical community that Methadone Maintenance Treatment is the *most* effective modality for the treatment of opioid addiction. Any opposition to this clinic is based in misinformation and stigma alone and absent any logic or factual considerations. I encourage all who are serious to visit the links I have posted previously in this feed."

In sincerity,
Zac Talbott, Director
NAMA-Recovery of TN
(**sorry I had to cut away some of your post, in order to include it as part on this post; within the limited wording space allowed**)

You actually proved my point.
These Clinics have guidelines in place, but they don't always follow them.

Methadone clinics should only be used to treat opioid addictions.
Not pot addictions, or alcoholism or as an affordable pain medication.

These clinics can be a life saver for those truly in need;and with a genuine desire to beat their opioid addiction.

But when the patients misuse the clinic and the clinic is aware that misuse is taking place and allows it to continue, then there is cause for concern.

And when these clinics do not have a program in place to help the patients,that after long term use wish to come off the methadone, that seems to indicate that these clinics are more interested in keeping patients on methadone.

As I mentioned before : City officials could hold a public forum along with the owner and staff of the purposed Clinic to address any concerns the community has.
A Question and Answer session could go a long way toward helping to ease the public's concerns.



Concerned

AOL

#86 Apr 3, 2013
Concerned
wrote:
"If you read the past posts you can see exactly which problems are being referred to."

Zac Talbott of TN NAMA R
wrote:
"No, there has not been any citations of specific problems; Only generalized myths & assumptions."

Problems/concerns that have been mentioned in past posts:

Increase in crime.(Which was pointed out not to be true.)
Decrease in property values.
The possibility of parking issues at the clinic.
The long lines of people waiting to receive their dosage (and their behavior).
Increase in traffic.
Possible accident risks after people have received their dosage.
Concerns that the clinic might not follow strict guidelines and will take patients for reasons other than opiate addiction.
Concerns that methadone clinics do not offer a detox (from the methadone) program.

I think only one person aggressively opposed the clinic.

Most of the posts have expressed concerns and offered possible solutions to possible problems.
Many of the posts have been informative, and have addressed the concerns mentioned
Please learn the facts

Mckenzie, TN

#87 Apr 4, 2013
Methadone clinics are good things. Cities with clinics have lower crime rates, lower percentages of people with HIV and hepatitis. Also methadone saves lives. Once you are in the program patients don't get high off of the medication. These people are just able to live a normal life without having to worry about getting drugs on a daily basis. Studies conclude that longer terms in methadone clinics lead to better outcomes. Please stop this not in my back yard bull and start educating yourselves. People are suffering. If you don't have a PhD then stop trying to make medical decisions for other people. Addiction is a disease!
notroll

Jonesborough, TN

#88 Apr 4, 2013
Here is what opiate replacement therapy looks like:

Shooting leaves Johnson City man dead; alleged killer in custody

Read more: http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/News/article....
he needed help

Mckenzie, TN

#89 Apr 4, 2013
Maybe if he had more options for treatment that wouldn't have happened.
If it wasn't one thing it would have been another.

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