Has suboxone ruined my life forever?

Posted in the Johnson City Forum

Comments (Page 2)

Showing posts 21 - 40 of44
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
TN Doc

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#21
Jan 26, 2014
 
Follower of Christ wrote:
<quoted text>
True. Here's why. Most Drs aren't addicts. About 14% are. Well, not placing blame, just stating KNOWN, REAL LIFE FACT. Remember, it's a drug company that got the person on the pain pills and it's a drug company gonna get them off, right? MONEY
The suboxone doctors are making money but they are trying to help people. To get certified, they have to be specially trained on order to write suboxone scripts. Who trains them? You guessed it. The drug company.
You'll see the post above by the guy who said he made them last a year. THATS A FACT ! The doctor gets their training and they get a chart that basically It says "if the addict is taking this much , then prescribe this much". A chart.
Well, what did this girl say she was on? A few lortabs? Thank GOD. Mine started with a broken leg, 3 places. At one point, I was legally taking a quantity of three , strength of thirty MG Oxycotins per day. It's not a contest but in comparison to her lortabs, I was taking 5 times as much as she was.
I ran out twice over the course of about 15 months and it's a living hell. You can't expect someone to willingly go thru that. Anyhow, the doctor gave me 5 strips per day. By this time , I was dead serious about getting off and I talked to other addicts that had got clean and they gave me the real scoop.
I'm sorry. I don't mean to disparage the above future doctor, but he's wrong on almost every count. I just thought about it, I guess it was two years without a pain pill last month. I never even crave like some people say they do. I took the suboxone and tapered off.
My god the lawmakers are stupid. Tennessee is the number one addicted state. God as my witness, I could get 1/2 the people in the state off pain pills in nine months. And suboxone is cheap to make, but they charge out the butt. Like $7 per strip ... If I had taken all 5 per day that would have been a $35 per day habit and brother you called it....... If you get heavily into suboxone like taking 3,4 or 5 per day and the STOP....... Well, I'm sure I'd rather die and I'm serious.
THEY SHOULD MAKE SUBOXONE CHEAP AS HELL AND EASY TO GET BUT DONT OVER PRESCRIBE.......BY THE WAY. THERE IS NO HIGH.......IT HAS A CEILING SO NOBODYS HAVING A PARTY.......
Physicians don't cause their patients to become addicts because they will be held criminally accountable if caught writing scripts that would cause addiction. Patients abusing their scripts cause addiction in the manner I described above. I see it every day.
OldTennGranny

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#22
Jan 26, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
No patient becomes addicted to a narcotic painkiller simply from a prescription written for them by their physician.
That isnt true at all. One of my Doctor's put me on Hydrocodone for Shingles pain. I took it exactly as prescribed. After being on it for a while I felt like I was becoming addicted to it because I could be sound asleep and my body would wake me up right on time for my next dose and if I didnt take it right at that time I was in a different type of pain and tremors and nervousness and even fear of what was happening to me. I told my Doctor I was afraid I was becoming addicted to it and explained the reaction I was having and he said to just take the medicine and let him worry about whether I was becoming addicted or not. I went home and started weining myself off of the medicine and guess what? Once I was completely off of the Hydrocodone I quit waking up at dosage times and I never had that added pain again. I sure didnt go to any other Doctor's for any other pain medications either. I do realize my Doctor was simply trying to help me but I believe with my whole heart that I was becoming addicted to it.
TN Doc

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#23
Jan 27, 2014
 
OldTennGranny wrote:
<quoted text>
That isnt true at all. One of my Doctor's put me on Hydrocodone for Shingles pain. I took it exactly as prescribed. After being on it for a while I felt like I was becoming addicted to it because I could be sound asleep and my body would wake me up right on time for my next dose and if I didnt take it right at that time I was in a different type of pain and tremors and nervousness and even fear of what was happening to me. I told my Doctor I was afraid I was becoming addicted to it and explained the reaction I was having and he said to just take the medicine and let him worry about whether I was becoming addicted or not. I went home and started weining myself off of the medicine and guess what? Once I was completely off of the Hydrocodone I quit waking up at dosage times and I never had that added pain again. I sure didnt go to any other Doctor's for any other pain medications either. I do realize my Doctor was simply trying to help me but I believe with my whole heart that I was becoming addicted to it.
Believe what you want. A physician cannot legally prescribe a dosage that will even remotely cause addiction. No physician is going to take that chance anyway. Abusing prescribed dosages and doctor shopping is what causes addiction along with purchasing prescription meds off the street.
Practicing prescriber

Kingsport, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#24
Feb 2, 2014
 

Judged:

1

TN Doc,
I work with pt that are or have been addicts all the time. I work with collegues that have been addicts. You have a severe lack of respect for the weapons you are about to possess. Addiction does not develop based the dosage used, the need for dosage will increase as addiction worsens. Opiates change the chemistry of the brain over a short period; consistent use for 7 days will almost guarantee some degree of physical dependence & withdrawal symptoms when the supy stops. However, physical dependence is just that: physical. Addiction is both physical & psychological and can begin after just 2-3 doses. Besides your ill-advised view of your prescriptive power two other things concern me about this thread. 1. The original poster mentioned in one post that "all I want is something to ease the pain both physical and mental" which is a red flag for me. 2. SUBOXONE DOES NOT TREAT ADDICTION but merely masks the symptoms & allows time for treatment to begin.

You missed both of these issues.

So far, there has not been a post listed on this thread that describes a true understanding of addiction or the dangers of the medication and prescribing. You, TN Doc, need to spend time working with some of us who are working with the after effects of addiction because in critical care you will see a ton of it and it will blur the lines between acute injury and chronic disease. Ask your professors, they can give you some names. As ypu begin independent practice, you will be astonished (for a while) about what an addict looks like- few are stereotypical & some will be your co-workers. Addiction is not a personality flaw, it's a disease with documentable physical changes to the brain and a typical progression pattern; some are more prone to it just as some are more prone to diabetes. You also need to understand that sometimes physical pain is a good thing to allow to some degree & allowing it to occur at a controlled level is better than handing an arsenal over to an emotionally taxed pt (which critically ill pt are). Remember that red flag of "mental pain"- opiates (narcotics is a legal term not medical) are not approved for use of "mental pain". I wish you luck but watch your attitude, if you aren't learning something new from an article, a collegue, or a patient every day, you ARE already behind in the game.
TheTruth

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#25
Feb 2, 2014
 
Tammy J wrote:
I went on suboxone 2/3 yrs ago due to abusing pain medication perscription, that I have/had a need to be on them. My Dr. explained that I would be an excellent patient for short term use. I recently told him that the medication prescribed(sub) does not touch the pain i'm having. I qas then tild that I could me receive help for any pain including cronic.. Does anyone know of a MD that will help me off the suboxone rather than judge me and talk ti me of any other options. Thanks :-)
Your own choices have led you to where you are in your life. Not Suboxone. Not your doctor.
TN Doc

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#26
Feb 2, 2014
 
Practicing prescriber wrote:
TN Doc,
You have a severe lack of respect for the weapons you are about to possess. Addiction does not develop based the dosage used, the need for dosage will increase as addiction worsens. Opiates change the chemistry of the brain over a short period; consistent use for 7 days will almost guarantee some degree of physical dependence & withdrawal symptoms when the supy stops. However, physical dependence is just that: physical. Addiction is both physical & psychological and can begin after just 2-3 doses. Besides your ill-advised view of your prescriptive power two other things concern me about this thread. 1. The original poster mentioned in one post that "all I want is something to ease the pain both physical and mental" which is a red flag for me. 2. SUBOXONE DOES NOT TREAT ADDICTION but merely masks the symptoms & allows time for treatment to begin.
You missed both of these issues.
So far, there has not been a post listed on this thread that describes a true understanding of addiction or the dangers of the medication and prescribing. You, TN Doc, need to spend time working with some of us who are working with the after effects of addiction because in critical care you will see a ton of it and it will blur the lines between acute injury and chronic disease. Ask your professors, they can give you some names. As ypu begin independent practice, you will be astonished (for a while) about what an addict looks like- few are stereotypical & some will be your co-workers. Addiction is not a personality flaw, it's a disease with documentable physical changes to the brain and a typical progression pattern; some are more prone to it just as some are more prone to diabetes. You also need to understand that sometimes physical pain is a good thing to allow to some degree & allowing it to occur at a controlled level is better than handing an arsenal over to an emotionally taxed pt (which critically ill pt are). Remember that red flag of "mental pain"- opiates (narcotics is a legal term not medical) are not approved for use of "mental pain". I wish you luck but watch your attitude, if you aren't learning something new from an article, a collegue, or a patient every day, you ARE already behind in the game.
For starters, I like your attitude, but your facts are simply incorrect. I do detect a passionate desire to help those addicted, but what you state does not accomplish that and your facts are simply incorrect. Dosage is exactly what causes addiction and addiction to any prescribed medication is a personality disorder. That is because any prescribed medication is dosed at an amount that has been proven not to cause addiction. That my friend was determined medically and is legally enforced. Prescriptions are written in dosage amounts that are harmless to patients. Personally, I get frustrated at hearing addicts blame their physicians for becoming addicted when there is no physician who can legall write a prescription in an amount that causes addiction. Addiction is caused my abusing the prescription's instructions, by doctor shopping and by buying the drug off the street. As I stated earlier, most of these "pain pills" are forumulated in a time release fashion. Abusers of these drugs chew them up to negate the time release mechanism in these drugs. That is a personality disorder. They know what they are doing, know the repercussions, and they do it anyway. Later, after the ill effects have manifested themselves, they blame their doctor.

For example, you can take a 7.5 mg Lortab twice a night for 30 days and stop cold turkey and not feel any ill effects. Take a Lortab 10, which is 10 mg every 2 hours for 30 days and you will notice some withdrawal. Drink while taking Lortab will make it worse. Take Percocet and multiply the ill effects by 10 since this is a more potent medication.

I have treated 100's of Lortab and Percocet addicts. Each case is eerily similar.
SJD

Johnson City, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#27
Feb 10, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
<quoted text>
All medical physicians have to go through a residency program. There are no exceptions. Family medicine is a 3 year program. Add minor surgery as a specialty and that turns it into a four year program. My residency is completed in May. I take the board exams in June. Lortabs are time released medication. Don't know where or how you get your info, but I would find another source. You are simply incorrect.
Lortab is absolutely not extended release. I have multiple sclerosis patient and was prescribed the 10/325 mg Lortabs for 8 yrs. One dose would last 4-6 hours. The FDA recently, in Oct. 2013, approved the first and only pure hydrocodone extended release medication currently available. Lortab is hydrocodone with acetaminophen (tylenol). If you are really almost finished with residency I am concerned about the safety of your future patients.
To answer the original question, no Suboxone doesn't have to ruin your life. After being on narcotic pain meds for many years I became physically dependent on them. When I moved here from out of state I had trouble finding a doc who would keep me on the dosage I was accustomed to. I ended up at a suboxone clinic. Taking Advil with the suboxone has managed my pain quite well. Just make sure you take it as prescribed. Good luck.
TN Doc

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#28
Feb 10, 2014
 
SJD wrote:
<quoted text>
Lortab is absolutely not extended release. I have multiple sclerosis patient and was prescribed the 10/325 mg Lortabs for 8 yrs. One dose would last 4-6 hours. The FDA recently, in Oct. 2013, approved the first and only pure hydrocodone extended release medication currently available. Lortab is hydrocodone with acetaminophen (tylenol). If you are really almost finished with residency I am concerned about the safety of your future patients.
To answer the original question, no Suboxone doesn't have to ruin your life. After being on narcotic pain meds for many years I became physically dependent on them. When I moved here from out of state I had trouble finding a doc who would keep me on the dosage I was accustomed to. I ended up at a suboxone clinic. Taking Advil with the suboxone has managed my pain quite well. Just make sure you take it as prescribed. Good luck.
SJD, you just confirmed what I stated. How do you think a Lortab's effects will last 4-6 hours? It is because it is a time release medication. Chew it up, it will become a lot more potent for about 20 minutes, then the effects will rapidly wear off. you simply do not know what "time release" means. I do.
SJD

Johnson City, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#29
Feb 11, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
<quoted text>
SJD, you just confirmed what I stated. How do you think a Lortab's effects will last 4-6 hours? It is because it is a time release medication. Chew it up, it will become a lot more potent for about 20 minutes, then the effects will rapidly wear off. you simply do not know what "time release" means. I do.
Sorry but no you do not. Extended release medication is taken once or sometimes twice a day. Regular immediate release medications are taken several times a day since they do not last as long. After I was put on Opana which is an extended release opiate I took once a day I was also given a Lortab to take in between doses for break through pain. Medications that only last 4-6 hours are not extended release. Just like Advil and Tylenol are not considered time release since they can be taken every 4-6 hours. I was an RN for many years and have a lot of experience with these medications. Pretending to be a physician and giving false medical advice can be extremely dangerous. This article explains it fairly well.
http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/tre...
Ozone

Kingsport, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#30
Feb 11, 2014
 

Judged:

1

SJD wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry but no you do not. Extended release medication is taken once or sometimes twice a day. Regular immediate release medications are taken several times a day since they do not last as long. After I was put on Opana which is an extended release opiate I took once a day I was also given a Lortab to take in between doses for break through pain. Medications that only last 4-6 hours are not extended release. Just like Advil and Tylenol are not considered time release since they can be taken every 4-6 hours. I was an RN for many years and have a lot of experience with these medications. Pretending to be a physician and giving false medical advice can be extremely dangerous. This article explains it fairly well.
http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/tre...
You are correct SJD. This fake quack doc wannabe is handing out bogus information and is not very good at it. Even an opie head who snorts Lortabs knows they are not time released. I hope people will take your advice and ignore the bogus doc!
Ozone

Kingsport, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31
Feb 11, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
<quoted text>
For starters, I like your attitude, but your facts are simply incorrect. I do detect a passionate desire to help those addicted, but what you state does not accomplish that and your facts are simply incorrect. Dosage is exactly what causes addiction and addiction to any prescribed medication is a personality disorder. That is because any prescribed medication is dosed at an amount that has been proven not to cause addiction. That my friend was determined medically and is legally enforced. Prescriptions are written in dosage amounts that are harmless to patients. Personally, I get frustrated at hearing addicts blame their physicians for becoming addicted when there is no physician who can legall write a prescription in an amount that causes addiction. Addiction is caused my abusing the prescription's instructions, by doctor shopping and by buying the drug off the street. As I stated earlier, most of these "pain pills" are forumulated in a time release fashion. Abusers of these drugs chew them up to negate the time release mechanism in these drugs. That is a personality disorder. They know what they are doing, know the repercussions, and they do it anyway. Later, after the ill effects have manifested themselves, they blame their doctor.
For example, you can take a 7.5 mg Lortab twice a night for 30 days and stop cold turkey and not feel any ill effects. Take a Lortab 10, which is 10 mg every 2 hours for 30 days and you will notice some withdrawal. Drink while taking Lortab will make it worse. Take Percocet and multiply the ill effects by 10 since this is a more potent medication.
I have treated 100's of Lortab and Percocet addicts. Each case is eerily similar.
Sounds to me you like have been delving in some self applied Guinea pig hands on research with opiates and trying to profess yourself an expert. Unless you chew a timed release med like a cow with a cud, you will not negate its intended affect. You seriously need to curb your delusional ambition to be a doc before you kill somebody.
SJD

Johnson City, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#32
Feb 14, 2014
 
Ozone wrote:
<quoted text>Sounds to me you like have been delving in some self applied Guinea pig hands on research with opiates and trying to profess yourself an expert. Unless you chew a timed release med like a cow with a cud, you will not negate its intended affect. You seriously need to curb your delusional ambition to be a doc before you kill somebody.
Thank you. Hopefully that quack will give up his wannabe doctor act and stop spewing out false info before someone gets hurt.
TN Doc

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#33
Feb 14, 2014
 

Judged:

1

SJD wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry but no you do not. Extended release medication is taken once or sometimes twice a day. Regular immediate release medications are taken several times a day since they do not last as long. After I was put on Opana which is an extended release opiate I took once a day I was also given a Lortab to take in between doses for break through pain. Medications that only last 4-6 hours are not extended release. Just like Advil and Tylenol are not considered time release since they can be taken every 4-6 hours. I was an RN for many years and have a lot of experience with these medications. Pretending to be a physician and giving false medical advice can be extremely dangerous. This article explains it fairly well.
http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/tre...
Sorry, but you couldn't be more incorrect. The time between dosages does not have anything to do with whether the drug is time release or not. The time between dosages is based strictly on the half-life of the active ingredient. The half-life of hydrocodone is 4 hours.

Time release is based solely on how the drug is encapsulated. Every Lortab has a special coating on it that keeps the drug from immediately flooding your system. Chew a Lortab, this coating's effect is minimized. Don't believe me, next time you have a prescription for Lortab, go chew it up and see how quick its effects are realized.

I have nothing to gain by posting false information on Lortab. I am trying to help those taking it, those abusing it, and those addicted to it. Why anyone would comdemn me for this is beyond me.

Facts are facts. Do a little research and you will quickly prove to yourself the effects of hydrocodone.
SJD

Johnson City, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#34
Feb 16, 2014
 
I am not going to continue to argue.
I hope the OP finds the doctor who helps her/him do what it takes to live a fulfilling life. Best wishes.
Wannabe Doc Too

Erin, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#35
Feb 16, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry, but you couldn't be more incorrect. The time between dosages does not have anything to do with whether the drug is time release or not. The time between dosages is based strictly on the half-life of the active ingredient. The half-life of hydrocodone is 4 hours.
Time release is based solely on how the drug is encapsulated. Every Lortab has a special coating on it that keeps the drug from immediately flooding your system. Chew a Lortab, this coating's effect is minimized. Don't believe me, next time you have a prescription for Lortab, go chew it up and see how quick its effects are realized.
I have nothing to gain by posting false information on Lortab. I am trying to help those taking it, those abusing it, and those addicted to it. Why anyone would comdemn me for this is beyond me.
Facts are facts. Do a little research and you will quickly prove to yourself the effects of hydrocodone.
Hydrocodone has a score on the pill, so that one can break it in half if one should choose to do so.
Morphine on the other hand, in the pill form, is usually 12 hour extended release, and it has no score on it.
Ozone

Kingsport, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#36
Feb 17, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry, but you couldn't be more incorrect. The time between dosages does not have anything to do with whether the drug is time release or not. The time between dosages is based strictly on the half-life of the active ingredient. The half-life of hydrocodone is 4 hours.
Time release is based solely on how the drug is encapsulated. Every Lortab has a special coating on it that keeps the drug from immediately flooding your system. Chew a Lortab, this coating's effect is minimized. Don't believe me, next time you have a prescription for Lortab, go chew it up and see how quick its effects are realized.
I have nothing to gain by posting false information on Lortab. I am trying to help those taking it, those abusing it, and those addicted to it. Why anyone would comdemn me for this is beyond me.
Facts are facts. Do a little research and you will quickly prove to yourself the effects of hydrocodone.
Doc, you are getting way out there! Even a layman knows the coating on any type of NSAID is to insure it will be processed mainly in the intestines to insure that stomach bleeding will be minimal. And you call yourself a doctor! Time released medicines are generally in capsule form with beaded coatings that dissolve at different intervals, thusly "time released". Do you even have a clue as to what half life means? You are correct, you have nothing to gain from spewing false information, so why don't you shut up? To the original poster, please don't take Tn Doc seriously. I fear he has been playing with too many Tabs!
Chemind

Columbus, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#37
Feb 18, 2014
 
not from around here 1997 wrote:
To TN Doc: Lortabs are not a time-release medication. I pray someone gives you a handheld PDR before you write that first prescription.
You're absolutely right. Lortabs are immediate release. TN doc is misinformed which is something I've learned to despise against physicians. I would not take advice from this person. Pharmacist know far more about medicine than most physicians. It's they're job to know. Physicians often do consult on medications with pharmacist when a question about particulars arise. Take your info with a grain of salt. TN doc is talking out of the side of their neck. I recommend they spend some more time studying pharmacology.
Stumbo

Jonesborough, TN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#39
Feb 18, 2014
 
TN Doc wrote:
No physician is allowed to write a prescription for a narcotic in a dosage that will even remotely cause addiction. No doctor is going to risk their license even if it were possible to do this. No patient becomes addicted to a narcotic painkiller simply from a prescription written for them by their physician. People become addicted when they obtain multiple prescriptions from multiple doctors or purchase them off the street. Anyone doing this knowingly does this to obtain the pleasurable sensation they obtain from the drug. In a short amount of time doing this, they become addicted. I've heard the sob stories about back pain, arthritic pain, nerve pain, etc. They are all excuses an addict uses to justify how they became addicted. Going to one physician for pain and obtaining a prescription for a narcotic for that pain will not and does not induce addiction - period. There are enough checks and balances to keep this from happening. Again, the process is abused by seeking out more doctors willing to write more prescriptions. It is difficult to overcome this addiction. It is a physical addiction in that you simply cannot tolerate going "cold turkey." It is very dangerous to go "cold turkey." Withdrawal symptoms include violent spasms and tremors in joints that induce pain that cannot be tolerated without medical help. One must seek a certified rehabilitation center and plan on spending at least a week along with continued therapy. However, there are multitudes of success stories I would be more than happy to share. The first step is realizing where and why you went wrong. The next step is the initiative to do something about it.
You pretty much summed it up.
TN Doc

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#40
Feb 18, 2014
 
Chemind wrote:
<quoted text>
You're absolutely right. Lortabs are immediate release. TN doc is misinformed which is something I've learned to despise against physicians. I would not take advice from this person. Pharmacist know far more about medicine than most physicians. It's they're job to know. Physicians often do consult on medications with pharmacist when a question about particulars arise. Take your info with a grain of salt. TN doc is talking out of the side of their neck. I recommend they spend some more time studying pharmacology.
You are either a novice pharmacologist or an addict trying to justify your addiction. If you are actually a pharmacologist, then you would know that hydrocodone has a very complex metabolic structure. It's metabolic pattern includes O- demethylation, N-demethylation and 6-keto reduction to the corresponding 6-&#945;- and 6-&#946;- hydroxymetabolites. If you are a true pharmacologist, you will know what this means.

Acetaminophen metabolizes quickly in the gastric system and thus can be labeled "immediate release."

If you would like to debate pharmacology and organic chemistry, I am game. Trust me though, you will lose this debate.
Wow

Shelby, NC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#41
Feb 18, 2014
 
@TNDoc
If you're that ignorant anyone can be a doctor! I've lost all faith in people. You're not even in med school. Quit pretending!
Is everyone enamered because he goes by TN Doc? He's already calling himself a doctor and is not even licensed but referring to him as Doc? Really? He either has control issues or too much time on his hands to keep this going. In med school I'm sure there's no time for that. And, he's not fully emotionally matured or he wouldn't be into keep this going. So, TN Doc get a life and quit living a fantasy!

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 21 - 40 of44
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

42 Users are viewing the Johnson City Forum right now

Search the Johnson City Forum:
Topic Updated Last By Comments
Boone Parents And Teachers And Staff 5 min Question for leadership 5
TBI Should Investigate Principals and Athletic ... 14 min Jon Brown 8
why are women so fat now days (Sep '11) 22 min Tom 261
TN Who do you support for Governor in Tennessee in... (Oct '10) 27 min BOiaF 124,053
TN Should state mandate immunizations? New require... (May '11) 43 min Get Real 8,463
employment 45 min longbowhunter 3
Cliven Bundy Ranch Standoff 45 min Pop 57
•••
•••
•••
Johnson City Dating

more search filters

less search filters

•••

Johnson City Jobs

•••
•••
•••

Johnson City People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••