Comments
21 - 40 of 45 Comments Last updated Feb 28, 2014
wth

Johnson City, TN

#22 Feb 16, 2014
@hmmm, Bought a brand new gas water heater at Lowes 2 years ago and it does NOT use any electricity. Been through several power outages and had plenty of hot water. Yeah, you can be an idiot and pay more for one that's digital but if you lose your power it's worthless,
Pop

Butler, TN

#23 Feb 16, 2014
Without electricity, how does the pilot light ignite? Just curious.
Kaisers stash

Kingsport, TN

#24 Feb 17, 2014
Hmmm wrote:
<quoted text>
You apparently know nothing about gas water heaters. Take a trip to Home Depot, or call ANY gas company, and educate yourself before making fool statements about "facts".
There are four types of gas water heaters.
1. The "conventional" type that vents straight up a metal flue pipe. These have a standing pilot light,(no power needed) and must have an air intake vent or a large enough room to feed combustion air to the burner
2. Direct vent. These can vent out the side of wall, but has to be located fairly close TO an exterior wall. The vent is double walled pipe, it pulls intake air in part of the pipe, takes it down the side of the tank (you'll see a piece of ductwork running down the side of the tank jacket), and runs the exhaust out the other part of the vent pipe. These are used where you can't use a straight upflow type exhaust. They are also standing pilot light...no power needed either. This is the model I have.
These two make up the majority of gas water heaters installed today. The majority of water heaters sold and in use today DO NOT need electric power. They use a standing pilot light.....you light it once, it stays lit, and when the tank temperature falls to a preset point on the thermostat ( a non electric thermostat ), the gas control feeds gas to the burner, the standing pilot light ignites that gas, and the tank water is heated.
3. Power vent. Similar to the direct vent, but you can locate them farther away from an exterior wall,(about 20' or so if I recall) and a fan sucks the intake air in for combustion and moves the exhaust on out the vent. Still uses a standing pilot light, but does require a small amount of electric power to run that fan. The fan only runs when the main burner ignites.
4. Tankless. Heater without a storage tank, heats the water as called for when a tap opens. Uses a small amount of power to run the sensors, computer control board, and electronic ignition ( doesn't use a standing pilot light ).
.
.
As to the rest of your comments, yes, it often does cost money to save money. So what ?
Either spend the money to save MORE in the long run, or sit around and moan about life.
I might be wrong but I think gas water heaters with standing pilot lights were phased out about ten years ago. One thing I'm sure of is that todays water heaters use an electrically generated pilot light.
Gasbag

Kingsport, TN

#25 Feb 18, 2014
Hmmm wrote:
<quoted text>
You apparently know nothing about gas water heaters. Take a trip to Home Depot, or call ANY gas company, and educate yourself before making fool statements about "facts".
There are four types of gas water heaters.
1. The "conventional" type that vents straight up a metal flue pipe. These have a standing pilot light,(no power needed) and must have an air intake vent or a large enough room to feed combustion air to the burner
2. Direct vent. These can vent out the side of wall, but has to be located fairly close TO an exterior wall. The vent is double walled pipe, it pulls intake air in part of the pipe, takes it down the side of the tank (you'll see a piece of ductwork running down the side of the tank jacket), and runs the exhaust out the other part of the vent pipe. These are used where you can't use a straight upflow type exhaust. They are also standing pilot light...no power needed either. This is the model I have.
These two make up the majority of gas water heaters installed today. The majority of water heaters sold and in use today DO NOT need electric power. They use a standing pilot light.....you light it once, it stays lit, and when the tank temperature falls to a preset point on the thermostat ( a non electric thermostat ), the gas control feeds gas to the burner, the standing pilot light ignites that gas, and the tank water is heated.
3. Power vent. Similar to the direct vent, but you can locate them farther away from an exterior wall,(about 20' or so if I recall) and a fan sucks the intake air in for combustion and moves the exhaust on out the vent. Still uses a standing pilot light, but does require a small amount of electric power to run that fan. The fan only runs when the main burner ignites.
4. Tankless. Heater without a storage tank, heats the water as called for when a tap opens. Uses a small amount of power to run the sensors, computer control board, and electronic ignition ( doesn't use a standing pilot light ).
.
.
As to the rest of your comments, yes, it often does cost money to save money. So what ?
Either spend the money to save MORE in the long run, or sit around and moan about life.
You don't know what you are talking about. Conventional gas heaters do not rely on old school standing pilot lights, they have an electrical burner that is regulated by gas flow, not a standing pilot lights. Anything else was discontinued long ago. To be honest, gas heaters are less efficient than electric ones. Your copying and pasting managed to leave out the pertinent facts. In summary, you are full of it and making up stuff to justify your b.s. You might still find standing pilot lights on such stuff as old furnaces and stoves simply because they last a long time and are not up to standards. Get off the b.s. But back to the subject: you cannot rely on the power board to give an accurate reading on your usage, period.
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#26 Feb 18, 2014
wth wrote:
@hmmm, Bought a brand new gas water heater at Lowes 2 years ago and it does NOT use any electricity. Been through several power outages and had plenty of hot water. Yeah, you can be an idiot and pay more for one that's digital but if you lose your power it's worthless,
Yep. AND you can buy one today.
.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_50970-135-BFG1A4034T3...
.
Standing pilot light. This model DOES have a push button (piezo) lighter like your gas grill so you don't have to stick a match in it to light the pilot, but once you light the pilot, it stays lit until the gas runs out or is cut off somehow.....in other words, it burns ALL the time.
.
Here's another:
.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_89263-135-G2F7575T4PV...
.
Look under the specs: Ignition type: Pilot
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#27 Feb 18, 2014
Pop wrote:
Without electricity, how does the pilot light ignite? Just curious.
You light it...it stays lit all the time. Open the little door at the bottom and LOOK inside....you'll see a small flame burning all the time. This ACTUALLY isn't wasted, as it keeps the tank temp up somewhere in the 80-100 degree range after the main burner cuts out....so all the main burner has to do is bring it on up to 120-130.
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#28 Feb 18, 2014
Gasbag wrote:
<quoted text>You don't know what you are talking about. Conventional gas heaters do not rely on old school standing pilot lights, they have an electrical burner that is regulated by gas flow, not a standing pilot lights. Anything else was discontinued long ago.
And YET, you can go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy one today.( See above links.....I did your shopping for you, since you are apparently too lazy to even look )
.
But you are correct.....we have strayed on the topic.
.
AS I SUGGESTED early on in this thread, if you don't believe the power board's version, start checking it yourself. There are various ways to do so ( some of which I listed ), OR you can just bitch. See which is more effective.
Gasbag

Kingsport, TN

#29 Feb 18, 2014
Hmmm wrote:
<quoted text>
And YET, you can go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy one today.( See above links.....I did your shopping for you, since you are apparently too lazy to even look )
.
But you are correct.....we have strayed on the topic.
.
AS I SUGGESTED early on in this thread, if you don't believe the power board's version, start checking it yourself. There are various ways to do so ( some of which I listed ), OR you can just bitch. See which is more effective.
Well I'll be! Thanks for the info and pardon my questioning your posts. I reckon I'm not too old to learn something new! Thanks again. I guess I'll scrape the egg off my face for breakfast.
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#30 Feb 19, 2014
No problem. I'm a bit overbearing at times.....ask my wife.....:)

The standing pilot tanks will also outlast the electronic ignition tanks, because the pilot light keeps the the temperature up and humidity driven off, so the burner area doesn't rust.

Anyway, back on topic. The ONLY way to check the power board's meter readings is to do your own testing, and independently verify. As I've stated earlier on, I think most folks don't have a clue how much power they really use. Once you can SEE where you're using power, you can start the process of cutting down.
Gasbag

Kingsport, TN

#31 Feb 19, 2014
Hmmm wrote:
No problem. I'm a bit overbearing at times.....ask my wife.....:)
The standing pilot tanks will also outlast the electronic ignition tanks, because the pilot light keeps the the temperature up and humidity driven off, so the burner area doesn't rust.
Anyway, back on topic. The ONLY way to check the power board's meter readings is to do your own testing, and independently verify. As I've stated earlier on, I think most folks don't have a clue how much power they really use. Once you can SEE where you're using power, you can start the process of cutting down.
Thanks, Hmmm. But I still can't figure out how the power board's bogus usage graph tells me I'm burning more electricity when I'm not at home and using anything other than the essentials. Even if I could prove that, what else could I do?
Dirk

United States

#32 Feb 20, 2014
My house had electric heat and ac on an undersized 30 year old unit. I replaced it and my electric water heater.

After switching to gas tank less and gas heat, my typical electric bill is $82-90 down from $150-300(in winter...the old heat was incredibly inefficient)

You have to invest in insulation, stopping air leaks, and newer appliances if you want to save money. Electricity isn't as cheap as it used to be.
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#33 Feb 20, 2014
Yep....the SEER rating on a 30 year old AC unit is probably 3-5 range. They can't even sell a unit now less than 13. I installed a Mitsubishi 'mini split' unit ( small, ductless units ) last summer in our bedroom ( we don't have central AC ) that has a 23 SEER rating. So quiet, you almost can't hear it run.

Our Fearless Leader declared war on coal fired generation, and I take him at his word....."you won't believe what electricity will cost down the road" (or words to that effect). So if power costs are killing ya'll now, get ready....the future doesn't look any better.
Hmmm

Jonesborough, TN

#34 Feb 20, 2014
Gasbag wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks, Hmmm. But I still can't figure out how the power board's bogus usage graph tells me I'm burning more electricity when I'm not at home and using anything other than the essentials. Even if I could prove that, what else could I do?
Don't know what to tell you on that one. I'd be tempted to flip the main breaker off when you leave for work one day during mild weather, and flip it back on when you come in.....then look at the graph for THAT day.(maybe even do it for a week) If it doesn't show a flat line, I'd certainly want a explanation out of the PB.
Power

United States

#35 Feb 20, 2014
Have to have lights
Gasbag

Kingsport, TN

#36 Feb 21, 2014
Hmmm wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't know what to tell you on that one. I'd be tempted to flip the main breaker off when you leave for work one day during mild weather, and flip it back on when you come in.....then look at the graph for THAT day.(maybe even do it for a week) If it doesn't show a flat line, I'd certainly want a explanation out of the PB.
Ya know what, Hmmm, a friend of mine did just that and a bit more for 2 weeks and slept in a recliner chair in a sleeping bag with absolutely no power while he was home. According to him, his bill was not any less than the previous one! Maybe he was just pulling my leg, but I can believe it, since he is a reliable guy.
Question

United States

#37 Feb 21, 2014
What is a normal power bill for a 2000 sq. foot house this time of year?
wth

Johnson City, TN

#38 Feb 22, 2014
chuckling @Hmmm. yeah, the rest of you all need to learn how to Google.
Becky

United States

#39 Feb 24, 2014
We all need power so not much we can do.
Holly

United States

#40 Feb 25, 2014
My bill has been high all year
Power

United States

#41 Feb 25, 2014
Bad thing is we all have to have it to stay warm.

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