behind the debate

behind the debate

There are 25 comments on the Baltimore Sun story from Nov 16, 2008, titled behind the debate. In it, Baltimore Sun reports that:

So when Maryland lawmakers created a panel to study the issue, death penalty opponents hoped it would produce a similar recommendation and provide the boost needed to repeal the death penalty law.

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Mark D

Asheboro, NC

#1 Nov 16, 2008
I am a firm opponent of the death penalty, for "religious reasons". Yet, it is amazing to me, that the victim's "religious reasons" are being considered appropriate by the Commission to evaluate in applying the death penalty. At the same time "religious reasons" are not considered as valid reasons for hospitals and staff, pharmacists, etc to refuse to assist in abortions. "Religious reasons" are condemned roundly when discussing gay marriage. Isn't their some hipocrasy here? Is it because "religious reasons" now support the government's position?

Since: Sep 08

Owings Mills, MD

#2 Nov 16, 2008
Mark D wrote:
Isn't their some hipocrasy here? Is it because "religious reasons" now support the government's position?
Change the second to last word of your statement from "government's" to "Governor's" and you've hit the nail right on the head, Mark.
Dr Fred

United States

#3 Nov 16, 2008
This issue is a classic example of how Md. is becoming a one party totalitarian state. Makes legal the killing of the innocent and outlaws the killing of those who have inflicted irreparable on others. Why not develop a set of princples for killing criminals after the model the state uses to kill innocent babies. Woops- interferes with the leftist agenda which comes FIRST in this state.
Dr Fred

United States

#4 Nov 16, 2008
This issue is a classic example of how Md. is becoming a one party totalitarian state. Makes legal the killing of the innocent and outlaws the killing of those who have inflicted irreparable on others. Why not develop a set of princples for killing criminals after the model the state uses to kill innocent babies. Woops- interferes with the leftist agenda which comes FIRST in this state.
joe morgan

Cumberland, MD

#5 Nov 16, 2008
when the government abolishes the death penalty, what it is really saying is that we do not have faith in the judicial system to provide a fair and just trial.
while mistakes do happen in the system and it seems that minorities are sentenced to death row more than others, perhaps there is a reason for it. they do the crime. there are evil people in this world who kill others with no
compunction whatsoever. some calculate and stalk their prey, use them for whatever deviant
behavior they have and kill for the sake of killing so they will not be caught. we have a judicial system with a judge, jury, and lawyers designed more for the defense of the accusd than the victim. there are many, many heinous crimes of murder committed every day in our country and when caught, they will get a fair trial according to the law. i hope the last comfort the family of a murdered victim is not denied the right to see justice down to the maximum penalty. it truly saddens me to read of innocent people, children lured, raped and murdered. it is an injustice not see have them punished fully for their crime. for those who incite religious reasons for the abolishment of the death penalty, the only defense i render is that, the separation of the church and state, precludes any interpretation
of the death penalty. religion in any form, either recognized or cult, should not be a factor in the decision to abolish the death penalty. i sincerely hope that sane minds see that murder is murder and people should be held responsible for their actions.
Right on

Pensacola, FL

#6 Nov 16, 2008
Mark D wrote:
I am a firm opponent of the death penalty, for "religious reasons". Yet, it is amazing to me, that the victim's "religious reasons" are being considered appropriate by the Commission to evaluate in applying the death penalty. At the same time "religious reasons" are not considered as valid reasons for hospitals and staff, pharmacists, etc to refuse to assist in abortions. "Religious reasons" are condemned roundly when discussing gay marriage. Isn't their some hipocrasy here? Is it because "religious reasons" now support the government's position?
According to the Constitution State and Church are to be separate. The last time religion got involved in state issues, people got burned at the stake. Also, if I have my reproductive rights cut off, may I cut off yours?
There_R_no_liber ties

Cape Coral, FL

#7 Nov 16, 2008
For most of my life I believed in the death penalty. Now that I have a few decades of experience under my belt I don't trust our court system to afford defendants a fair trial. Let's look at a hypothetical homocide: Detectives go around to family first, then friends, coworkers, etc. until they find a nervous person or someone who exercised their rights not to talk. Once they have someone in their sights they fabriacate theory and build an entire case of circumstantial evidence against the person of interest. I have read many warrants which cite no evidence at all - nothing more then a statement by a detective that says he has probable cause to believe person X comitted the crime of murder. Then they get to trial and they're allowed to present to a jury unlimited amounts of fabricated, speculative theory and make affirmative statements saying this guy did it. We never know what the jury will be like. Do we have a scientist on that jury who wants to see hard evidence? Or do we have a group of soft hearts who want to see SOMEONE pay for the harm done to that sweet little child who was killed. All it takes is a story line of an arrest in a newspaper to convince the public that person X did it. I just don't trust the system and I don't trust the people working in it (prosecutors, cops). Courts are always biased in favor of prosecution.
Sandy K

AOL

#8 Nov 16, 2008
Case in point. If the death penalty had been in place...Would an innocent man have been put to death for a crime he did not commit? Too many innocent men and women are found guilty, only to be found innocent years later when someone cares enough to keep fighting. With the multiple examples of lax investigatons....no one state should have the death penalty.
NoDemPublican

Severna Park, MD

#9 Nov 16, 2008
From the article:

"...Maryland's death penalty commission held five public hearings with 84 witnesses offering more than 24 hours of testimony - mostly in favor of abolishing capital punishment."
==========

I'm pretty sure polls in the state of Maryland as well as nationally show a considerable majority of people favor the death penalty. And yet, the witnesses the panel heard were "mostly in favor of abolishing capital punishment". So if anyone is looking to see where the true bias lies, I guess this should pretty well expose it.

No need to continue to take this article apart. MOM (and M&M) created a panel which was expected to return certain results and the panel returned those expected results.

If you don't have the support of the majority of the people and you don't have the support of the majority of the legislature and you don't have the support of the majority of the courts, you do what MOM (and M&M) are doing. You find people who will dissemble and distort in your behalf and then you refuse to enforce the law. See? It's simple.

p.s.- bringing in someone who WASN'T accidentally executed by the state as a witness is a real amusing touch. What it really proves, yet again, is that the system works.

p.p.s.- bringing in victims' families as witnesses is made acceptable I suppose by the fact that the victims themselves were -- how should we say?-- unavailable. And it doesn't matter anyway -- we make laws for society, not for the victims or the families and friends of victims.
NoDemPublican

Severna Park, MD

#10 Nov 16, 2008
p.s.- bringing in someone who WASN'T accidentally executed by the state as a witness is a real amusing touch. What it really proves, yet again, is that the system works.

Correction: Even better, he was a panel member. LMAO, as they say...
e fox

Bloomfield Hills, MI

#11 Nov 16, 2008
Just give them a slap and tell them "NO" I promise they won't kill anymore.....just ask any Killer !!!
mom - sucks

Alexandria, VA

#12 Nov 16, 2008
we need to seperate the church from state here. why were they allowed to be on the panel?
Doug

Towson, MD

#13 Nov 16, 2008
So now, when DNA can be used to prove murder,we'll pay hundreds of thousands to house them, over the years????Not fair to the tax payers.Send the murderers to the "Trash to Steam "Plant.
Why??? Because true murderers wouldn't make decent Soylent Green wafers.
meetoo

Baltimore, MD

#14 Nov 16, 2008
Doug, you get my vote!
BLB

Parkville, MD

#15 Nov 16, 2008
I know that the liberal democrats in this state and the commision that they have assembled don't care what the majority of the peple want so it doesn't surprise me that they want to do away with the death penalty. It is kind of scary the direction that the criminal justice system is headed under the democratic leadership. The Gendenning administration totally destroye the Juvenile system. Makes it easier to see why a person has to be a little nervous walking down the street. It is because there are no conceques to the actions of the lawless people.
MDvet

Baltimore, MD

#16 Nov 16, 2008
I think life without parole is a punishment worth than death. Basically, waiting to die in a prison.
MDvet

Baltimore, MD

#17 Nov 16, 2008
typo worse
ichy

Baltimore, MD

#18 Nov 16, 2008
MDvet wrote:
I think life without parole is a punishment worth than death. Basically, waiting to die in a prison.
If that's the case then why do most death row inmates spend a decade or more fighting it out in one appeal after another?
kittykt

Washington, DC

#19 Nov 16, 2008
I think the problem is without the ultimate punishment of death - what is the plea? currently it is plead out to life without parole. if that becomes the top punishment, then what is the plea risk - life - period. therefore, there is always that possibility that someone can have a parole communted to a number of years. we dont know who the governor's of the future will be or what they will determine in those cases. so without the death penalty, there are no guarantees that a person convicted of the most heinous of crimes would one day walk free among us. remember, too, that death is only afford as punishment in the most heinous of crimes.
One Party State

Baltimore, MD

#20 Nov 16, 2008
Just another example of 'stacking the deck' by MOM and his cronies. Fill a commission with people who share you opinion, only call people as witnesses who share your opinion, etc. and surprise, surprise the outcome is that this commission decides it shares MOM's opinion. Talk about a diservice to the people they are supposed to represent!!!

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