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“Treadin troddin trails”

Since: Apr 08

Here and there

#1 Apr 10, 2008
Does anyone know any good places to find dry land fish? I have looked all over the place and haven't really found much this year.
good grief

Saluda, SC

#2 Apr 10, 2008
Fly on a wall wrote:
Does anyone know any good places to find dry land fish? I have looked all over the place and haven't really found much this year.
You might try asking Agnostic One.....he seems to know just about everything!

“Treadin troddin trails”

Since: Apr 08

Here and there

#3 Apr 10, 2008
good grief wrote:
<quoted text>You might try asking Agnostic One.....he seems to know just about everything!
That's about right! lol (jk ag1)
1whoknows

Columbia, SC

#4 Apr 10, 2008
what is a dry land fish???? how can fish be out of the water? is it like one of the mud skippers?
river

Pleasant Hill, TN

#5 Apr 10, 2008
Dry land fish are mushrooms that taste like fish.
Grateful

Smyrna, TN

#6 Apr 10, 2008
It is some sort of mushroom or other fungi, I think, that is found after alot of rain has occurred. I have never seen one but I have heard that they are sold for quite a good amount of money.
Grateful

Smyrna, TN

#7 Apr 10, 2008
I don't know where to find any currently tho...sorry :(

“Treadin troddin trails”

Since: Apr 08

Here and there

#8 Apr 10, 2008
I have found a couple. They are a mushroom that looks like a sponge, and they are so good if you fry them. You should really try one sometime.

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#9 Apr 10, 2008
There's been a bunch found down in the Pall Mall area. I can't give any specific locations because it's all private property. The best time to look, is after a quick shower of rain, and the sun pops out real bright. Also, look under apple trees!

I've been eating dry land fish my whole life, and have never thought they tasted like fish.

They use to have a contest at the Forbus General Store, for biggest dry land fish found. I won it one year, long LONG ago. I can't recall the weight now, but it was huge.

“Treadin troddin trails”

Since: Apr 08

Here and there

#10 Apr 10, 2008
I don't think they taste like fish, but I like them. I have found them mostly around cedar trees.

Since: Jan 08

United States

#11 Apr 10, 2008
http://www.morelmania.com/

Good site, complete with a sightings link.

When you find them, carry them home in a Onion bag or Potato Bag so that the spores fall out and replant.

Sorry GG that is the best I could do. lol
Tranquility

Norway, SC

#12 Apr 10, 2008
I love dryland fish, the ones you all are referring to I beleive are called "murells" (sp?).

We always found them around old fallen trees and close to the mayapple plants. You might ask someone at the old Forbus store, bet they know where to look.
poni

Jamestown, TN

#13 Apr 10, 2008
If you do eat dryland fish please wash and soak them good I eat half small slugg one time,it wasnt very good, it was in one of the small holes of the mushroom
Tranquility

Norway, SC

#14 Apr 10, 2008
Now I have a terrible visual poni. YUCK!!!

LOL

We always soaked ours in saltwater and then rinsed in colander before frying.
dry land fish

Rowesville, SC

#15 Apr 10, 2008
I always soak them overnight in salt water then empty that water. Then i cover them in salt water again and freeze them. I always fry them in cornmeal. We always find them near old rail fences, under cedar trees, under fruit trees. This year I found them near walnut trees. You never know where they might pop up at.
Sherry

Columbia, SC

#16 Apr 11, 2008
dry land fish wrote:
I always soak them overnight in salt water then empty that water. Then i cover them in salt water again and freeze them. I always fry them in cornmeal. We always find them near old rail fences, under cedar trees, under fruit trees. This year I found them near walnut trees. You never know where they might pop up at.
I can remember my sister and brother in law hunting them every year. He taught her about them and boy, he could really fry them and they were sooooo good, they would almost melt in your mouth. I would love to know where that you could find them at, but would have to take someone with me that actually knew what they were, because with my luck, I would get the posion kind and would die from trying to get back a long loved taste. Unfortunately both sister and her husband are gone to Heaven now, so I will never get to taste their "fish" again and don't think that anyone could fix them as they did, so guess that I will have to pass on trying to find them....
fred

Allardt, TN

#17 Apr 11, 2008
Have a friend that found about 70 Monday. We usually find them around old apple or cedar trees
Old employee

Jamestown, TN

#18 Apr 11, 2008
I have eat them they are delicious I dont know where you get them Ive heard they are hard to find.
xring

Norway, SC

#19 Apr 11, 2008
Dry land fish(morels) usually come up after a rain this time of year. The best places are under the mountain, but do not just take off on someones property to find them, be sure to have permission.
Barb

Norway, SC

#20 Apr 14, 2008
About the Morel Mushroom Season...
The morel mushroom season varies across the United States depending on the region in which you are located. Typically it arrives in the spring months for most regions. Many variables such as air temperature, ground temperature and rain levels impact the growing cycle and how bountiful the crop. There have been many studies as to how, where and why the morels make their grand appearance in certain conditions and not others. Most mushroom hunters will present all kinds of "SWATS" (Scientific Wild Ass Theories) on how, where, and when to find them. Almost every mushroom hunter will have a few "SWATS" of their own, some with merit, while others are just that....theories.

Typically they are found in moist areas, around dying or dead Elm trees, Sycamore and Ash trees, old apple orchards and maybe even in your own back yard. Ground cover varies and it is very likely that each patch of mushrooms you come across may be growing in totally different conditions. It is a common practice of shoomer's to hit their favorite spots year after year.

If you are a first time hunter, you should make your first hunting expedition with someone who knows what a good morel looks like. There are several types of morels, some edible and others poisonous. thegreatmorel.com

Morel mushrooms (dry land fish) in no way taste like fish. The closest thing I know of to the taste is the portabella mushroom when it is cooked as you would a morel.

THE HUNTING PLACES ARE CLOSELY GUARDED SECRETS, I HAVE NEVER MET ANYONE WHO WOULD TELL THE LOCATION OF THEIR FIND.

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