12 Arrested in Pain Clinic Raid

Oct 1, 2010 Full story: First Coast News 48

A local drug task force made up of the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office and federal agents raided a Dunn Avenue pain clinic and took 12 people into custody on charges of illegal drug trafficking and possession.

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crimson dynamo

Jacksonville, FL

#2 Oct 2, 2010
MIKE677 wrote:
Another day in the useless drug war, the more people you arrest the bigger the problem gets, once they get a felony their left with no chance of a good job even if america had any left. so they must turn to crime then to survive. you can not legislate morality.
Interesting comment....for the most part that's true.
A kid can make a mistake, I say a kid because an 18 year old, which I think is a kid, can do a felony for many things, pay their dues but that part can be the smallest part of all.
When they can't get a job...that's when the crime can step-up to more of a serious matter. Desperate people do desperate things...vicious circle.
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#3 Oct 2, 2010
You two have little grasp of our justice system. For most people to get a felony conviction takes six or seven felony arrests. True some people get it the first time but that is rare. Yes your life is pretty much ruined once you get a felony conviction but you ruined it all by yourself.

Crime is not a "mistake" but a choice to perform an act in violation of the law. Most crimes involve acts that cause another harm. So you are talking about an act that the state has decided is so grievous that it is worthy of felony designation. Not a mistake but a choice.

These narcotics destroy people, families, and hope for these people. Most turn to crime to support their habits. Many criminals are full blown addicts trying to support a habit.

I would agree that the drug war itself is as futile as our crime war. Like most other issues we will never fully devote the resources necessary to deal with the problem. Additionally, the greater problem is the acceptance of a large segment of our society as drugs use and criminality as acceptable as going to school, obtaining an education, and getting a job.

Until large segments of our population realize that education is your true opportunity in life and begin to accept their free education and work as hard at it as they do hanging out selling dope and getting into trouble then we will see the same amount of crime we see now regardless if drugs are legal or not. Without employ-ability, these people will continue to have no employment, prospects, and hope, continuing the cycle for another generation.
crimson dynamo

Jacksonville, FL

#4 Oct 2, 2010
Reality wrote:
You two have little grasp of our justice system. For most people to get a felony conviction takes six or seven felony arrests. True some people get it the first time but that is rare. Yes your life is pretty much ruined once you get a felony conviction but you ruined it all by yourself.
Crime is not a "mistake" but a choice to perform an act in violation of the law. Most crimes involve acts that cause another harm. So you are talking about an act that the state has decided is so grievous that it is worthy of felony designation. Not a mistake but a choice.
These narcotics destroy people, families, and hope for these people. Most turn to crime to support their habits. Many criminals are full blown addicts trying to support a habit.
I would agree that the drug war itself is as futile as our crime war. Like most other issues we will never fully devote the resources necessary to deal with the problem. Additionally, the greater problem is the acceptance of a large segment of our society as drugs use and criminality as acceptable as going to school, obtaining an education, and getting a job.
Until large segments of our population realize that education is your true opportunity in life and begin to accept their free education and work as hard at it as they do hanging out selling dope and getting into trouble then we will see the same amount of crime we see now regardless if drugs are legal or not. Without employ-ability, these people will continue to have no employment, prospects, and hope, continuing the cycle for another generation.
You lost me on your second sentence...NOT TRUE.
You can get a felony easily on your first offense and the felony can have "nothing" to do with drugs.
The kid can't find a job and they NOW turn to drugs and the cycle starts.
It happens every day.
I have a pretty good grasp of the system and it does in fact HELP produce druggies. Our system is still the best but it could use some tweaking.
Still MONEY and/or FAME plays a part in our judicial system and the same offense does not carry the same weight when those two factors are played.
You need really need a reality check.
POS

United States

#5 Oct 2, 2010
Reality wrote:
You two have little grasp of our justice system. For most people to get a felony conviction takes six or seven felony arrests. True some people get it the first time but that is rare. Yes your life is pretty much ruined once you get a felony conviction but you ruined it all by yourself.
Crime is not a "mistake" but a choice to perform an act in violation of the law. Most crimes involve acts that cause another harm. So you are talking about an act that the state has decided is so grievous that it is worthy of felony designation. Not a mistake but a choice.
These narcotics destroy people, families, and hope for these people. Most turn to crime to support their habits. Many criminals are full blown addicts trying to support a habit.
I would agree that the drug war itself is as futile as our crime war. Like most other issues we will never fully devote the resources necessary to deal with the problem. Additionally, the greater problem is the acceptance of a large segment of our society as drugs use and criminality as acceptable as going to school, obtaining an education, and getting a job.
Until large segments of our population realize that education is your true opportunity in life and begin to accept their free education and work as hard at it as they do hanging out selling dope and getting into trouble then we will see the same amount of crime we see now regardless if drugs are legal or not. Without employ-ability, these people will continue to have no employment, prospects, and hope, continuing the cycle for another generation.
Your so stupid.. u have no grasp on our justice system. I'm a probation officer and I can tell you first hand that people get felonies everyday on a first offense. Yes there is diversion programs to get it erased for first offense but not with every case. Our "system" is f*cked up and needs to be changed because some people have been in wrong place wrong time and ended up getting charged way too harshly!
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#6 Oct 2, 2010
crimson dynamo wrote:
<quoted text>
You lost me on your second sentence...NOT TRUE.
You can get a felony easily on your first offense and the felony can have "nothing" to do with drugs.
The kid can't find a job and they NOW turn to drugs and the cycle starts.
It happens every day.
I have a pretty good grasp of the system and it does in fact HELP produce druggies. Our system is still the best but it could use some tweaking.
Still MONEY and/or FAME plays a part in our judicial system and the same offense does not carry the same weight when those two factors are played.
You need really need a reality check.
Crimson you have no idea. I routinely see people with six or seven felony arrests and no conviction. Usually the ones who get diverted are not the ones who, "made a mistake," but the career criminals. The people who don't know any better usually make a confession and get hammered while the career criminals keep their mouth's shut and wait for the slap on the wrist. Remember last year the Times Union story even quoted the career criminal saying just wait thirty days and they drop your case.

Spend just a few days in court and watch the plea bargains and it will make you sick.

I never denied people get felony convictions their first time but they are the exception and not the rule.

Don't even get me started about the joke that is our probation system. These guys usually rank up numerous violations only to get their probation reinstated.

I am not against legalization of drugs but you have to realize it will bring its own set of problems while not fixing the ones we currently have of crime driven by drug use.

Fix society first and the rest will follow.
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#7 Oct 2, 2010
POS wrote:
<quoted text>
Your so stupid.. u have no grasp on our justice system. I'm a probation officer and I can tell you first hand that people get felonies everyday on a first offense. Yes there is diversion programs to get it erased for first offense but not with every case. Our "system" is f*cked up and needs to be changed because some people have been in wrong place wrong time and ended up getting charged way too harshly!
Your name says it best and you are a in the wrong line of work with your attitude. I never said there are no first timers but they are few and far between. Here is the simple answer. If you don't want to face the penalties associated with a felony "DON'T COMMIT A CRIME." Read that slowly over and over again to yourself until you begin to grasp it.

This leaves me to wonder if you are one of the probation officers who lets their watches get away with murder until they do because you feel it justifies the unfair treament they faced at the hands of the system. Then you are shocked when the little thugs can't live right despite all the breaks you've given them.
POS

United States

#8 Oct 2, 2010
No they're not few and far between u idiot.. its a felony f*ckin po office I work in. No everyone don't get breaks.. not everyone committed the crime I don't believe.. many yes but 1% no. And to see those people suffer its sad.. if people could get jobs after a felony it wouldn't b bad... but noone can get jobs after any felony... they should be able to discriminate unless its murder or sex crime or repeat offender period
cHaOtIcMom

United States

#9 Oct 2, 2010
POS wrote:
<quoted text>
Your so stupid.. u have no grasp on our justice system. I'm a probation officer and I can tell you first hand that people get felonies everyday on a first offense. Yes there is diversion programs to get it erased for first offense but not with every case. Our "system" is f*cked up and needs to be changed because some people have been in wrong place wrong time and ended up getting charged way too harshly!
It's you're (you are)...not your. If you are going to call someone stupid you should at least type it correctly.
living with pain

Loveland, OH

#10 Oct 2, 2010
few and far between? you cant be that stupid. just go on back to your tv, sit down with your bon bons and watch dragnet. reality, u need a reality check. few and far between also describes your thought process.
anvilhands

Orlando, FL

#13 Oct 2, 2010
Allright I'm speaking from experience here, I AM a convicted felon, first offense I EVER commited I was sentanced, sent to prison for 4 years, and I was only 20 years old when it happened. Whoever said you get five or six charges before one sticks is stupid as hell. Any time the police or state has enough evidence they ARE GOING to try there absoulte hardest to get a conviction. No city, county, or state police officer likes to look stupid for arresting somebody that they know the charges won't stick to.

As far as doctors prescribing pain meds to patients that don't need them it's wrong and they know it. Doctors are just like everyone else, they see enough money and eventually it warps their perspectives on right and wrong. I am not trying to justify there actions in any way I just wish that some people would put themselves in another persons shoes before blabbing about something you know nothing about. I've been at both ends of the spectrum as both a dealer and a user and let me tell you they aren't that far away from each other. Plus half these doctors in FL are fucked up on the same meds they are prescribing patients. GLAHHH STUPID PEOPLE! Peace Out -AnvilHands
living with pain

Loveland, OH

#14 Oct 2, 2010
sorry mike677. got carried away. was watching married with children when bon bons was mentioned. couldnt pass it up.
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#15 Oct 2, 2010
POS wrote:
No they're not few and far between u idiot.. its a felony f*ckin po office I work in. No everyone don't get breaks.. not everyone committed the crime I don't believe.. many yes but 1% no. And to see those people suffer its sad.. if people could get jobs after a felony it wouldn't b bad... but noone can get jobs after any felony... they should be able to discriminate unless its murder or sex crime or repeat offender period
If you are a probation officer so of course everyone is on felony probation that you deal with. However,if profanity is your firest resort when you do not agree with someone and this is the limit of your ability to articulate yourself then it indeed appears you have a job that exceeds your ability. You are complaining about what you indicate is 1 1/2%. So the vast majority of them earned their felony status.

What do you mean they shouldn't be able to discriminate against offenders? Employers get to chose who they want to employ and they can not employ thieves, dopers, batterers, and career losers and expect to stay in business. You don't even have a simple grasp of the reality that most people are in your office because they can not conduct themselves decently in normal society. They are not unemployable so much for the felony conviction but for the actions, behaviors, and mindset that led them to those felony convictions. Take away the felony convictions and most still can not speak proper English (black and white), show respect for others, get to work on time, be responsible, and work hard. You think employment is a right and you are part of the problem. Make yourself employable and you will always land on your feet. You are part of the problem.
anvilhands

Orlando, FL

#16 Oct 2, 2010
"Take away the felony convictions and most still can not speak proper English (black and white), show respect for others, get to work on time, be responsible, and work hard"

Reality you sound like someone who would discriminate against any person that had ever been in trouble with the law, felony conviction or not. Just because a person makes a poor choice in there life and pays there debt to society, either through prison time, fines, community service, or probation. You act like people don't have the ability to change, and to want something better for themselves. I promise you this. Some of the smartest, hardest working, and most respectfull people I have ever met were in prison. I knew ex cops, lawyers, doctors, drug dealers, rapists, murders you name it, that all made a mistake at one point in there lives. So please before you go talking like you know everything about anybody that has ever caught a felony conviction, please put yourself in our shoes. Go get yourself in trouble, sit in county fighting your case for 2 years then go to prison for a year or so. Once you do that and you can actually see the other side of the argument maybe somebody will listen to what you have to say. Until then have fun in your ignorance.-AnvilHands
anvilhands

Orlando, FL

#17 Oct 2, 2010
Ohh by the way if you think felons get "breaks" in life your seriously retarded. Go kill yourself
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#18 Oct 2, 2010
anvilhands wrote:
Allright I'm speaking from experience here, I AM a convicted felon, first offense I EVER commited I was sentanced, sent to prison for 4 years, and I was only 20 years old when it happened. Whoever said you get five or six charges before one sticks is stupid as hell. Any time the police or state has enough evidence they ARE GOING to try there absoulte hardest to get a conviction. No city, county, or state police officer likes to look stupid for arresting somebody that they know the charges won't stick to.
As far as doctors prescribing pain meds to patients that don't need them it's wrong and they know it. Doctors are just like everyone else, they see enough money and eventually it warps their perspectives on right and wrong. I am not trying to justify there actions in any way I just wish that some people would put themselves in another persons shoes before blabbing about something you know nothing about. I've been at both ends of the spectrum as both a dealer and a user and let me tell you they aren't that far away from each other. Plus half these doctors in FL are fucked up on the same meds they are prescribing patients. GLAHHH STUPID PEOPLE! Peace Out -AnvilHands
Lets see. First offense got you four years in prison. I find it interesting you failed to mention the offense nor your criminal record, must have been a good one.

I'll give you a challenge. Take your local newspaper and look at the top five crime stories and then run the offender's records through the clerk of the court. I will bet you that nine times out of ten their prior felony charges were dropped or involved no prison time and no felony conviction (you can tell as it says adjudication withheld) unless they involved armed robbery or some equally violent crime. For example an arrest was made on an armed robbery on 09-29-10 of William Seabrook for armed robbery to a credit union. His first felony arrest in 91 involved probation and adjudication withheld. His next grand theft in 2001 was dropped. Then the same year he got popped for burglary and possession of burglary tools. That was dropped. Then in 2007 came grand theft of a motor vehicle, dropped too. Then this year he was arrested for arson to a dwelling on 02-04-10. The charge was transferred to county court which means they are going to plea him out to a misdemeanor. So this guy is arrested for five felonies and not one adjudication of guilt and now armed robbery. You will find this much more common than the 1 1/2% who get nailed the first time.
Reality

Jacksonville, FL

#19 Oct 2, 2010
anvilhands wrote:
"Take away the felony convictions and most still can not speak proper English (black and white), show respect for others, get to work on time, be responsible, and work hard"
Reality you sound like someone who would discriminate against any person that had ever been in trouble with the law, felony conviction or not. Just because a person makes a poor choice in there life and pays there debt to society, either through prison time, fines, community service, or probation. You act like people don't have the ability to change, and to want something better for themselves. I promise you this. Some of the smartest, hardest working, and most respectfull people I have ever met were in prison. I knew ex cops, lawyers, doctors, drug dealers, rapists, murders you name it, that all made a mistake at one point in there lives. So please before you go talking like you know everything about anybody that has ever caught a felony conviction, please put yourself in our shoes. Go get yourself in trouble, sit in county fighting your case for 2 years then go to prison for a year or so. Once you do that and you can actually see the other side of the argument maybe somebody will listen to what you have to say. Until then have fun in your ignorance.-AnvilHands
How about this instead? I obey the law and don't do anything to get myself placed in jail. I continue to work hard and stay our of trouble and enjoy a full life devoid of the entanglements of the criminal justice system. Then I need not worry about felony convictions tying me down.

I don't deny it is ten times harder to get a job after the felony conviction but that is a hole that you dug for yourself. Nobody made you do it and your "bad decision" (read choice to do wrong) is what life is about. We all make choices that can make our lives harder or easier and to cry about something we had the power to control makes nothing better. It is not like you were out walking randomly and were stamped with felon beyond your control. You made conscious choices that led you down a path (as you indicated by drug dealing) that led you where you are now. Now you are going to have to work ten times harder but you alone have that power to bust your tail and still make something of your life. To wallow in self pity and consider yourself a victim of the "system" rather than taking responsibility for your actions does you no good. I don't begrudge anyone who has paid their time but now knuckle down and prove you learned something and you have taken responsibility for what you have done. Then you are on a road to recovering a life.
living with pain

Loveland, OH

#20 Oct 2, 2010
for his next trick reality will walk on water. dont miss it. how i wish i could be as perfect as you,
anvilhands

Orlando, FL

#21 Oct 2, 2010
Your to easy, seriously just go kill yourself it would be doing us all a favor. Ohh by the way I stabbed dumb SOB like yourself in the face cause he talked about something he knew nothing about. Have a nice day, I've got your IP adddress :)

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#22 Oct 2, 2010
The difference between being a dealer and an addict can only be a few hours. trust me.

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#23 Oct 2, 2010
i agree with anvilhands.

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