Who will run against and beat Angela ...

Who will run against and beat Angela Corey for State Attorney

Posted in the Jacksonville Forum

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Sue

Jacksonville, FL

#1 Jan 25, 2012
Who will run against and beat Angela Corey for State Attorney? Because lord knows we need a change.
Mickler

Jacksonville, FL

#2 Jan 25, 2012
It is hard to beat an incumbent. What do you have against Ms. Corey?

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#3 Jan 25, 2012
Yes, it is difficult but somebody must run against this woman and have her ousted.

I have a few things against her, Mickler...

http://www.change.org/petitions/remove-state-...

http://injusticeinfocus.wordpress.com/
Brian

Hillsborough, NJ

#4 Feb 20, 2012
injusticeinfocus wrote:
Yes, it is difficult but somebody must run against this woman and have her ousted.
I have a few things against her, Mickler...
http://www.change.org/petitions/remove-state-...
http://injusticeinfocus.wordpress.com/
Who is running in oposition? I'm not very informed, but I'd like to become more informed. I have read a lot about Ms Corey lately, and I have a close relative in the courthouse, so I would like to see a change.
Felicia

Jacksonville, FL

#5 Feb 24, 2012
It is time to elect a new state attorney in Jacksonville. There so many more qualified attorneys that would do a better job. Corey is costing tax payers a bundle with so many overcharged prosecutions to increase her filing rate. Harry Shorstein was a lot more moderate. Bring Harry back.
huh

Jacksonville, FL

#6 Feb 24, 2012
Felicia wrote:
It is time to elect a new state attorney in Jacksonville. There so many more qualified attorneys that would do a better job. Corey is costing tax payers a bundle with so many overcharged prosecutions to increase her filing rate. Harry Shorstein was a lot more moderate. Bring Harry back.
Did you lose your job when Corey came into office? Sounds that way.
Felicia

Jacksonville, FL

#7 Mar 4, 2012
Heard someone else is running for SA.
Randall

AOL

#8 Mar 4, 2012
The only way anyone would run against Corey is if they just want some publicity.
That's a lot of money to waste in this economic climate just to become known as "defeated".
Felicia

Jacksonville, FL

#9 Mar 4, 2012
You would be surprised to know how many people would support an alternative to Corey. Her extreme approach is not good policy and too expensive.
Brian

Hillsborough, NJ

#10 Mar 5, 2012
Felicia wrote:
You would be surprised to know how many people would support an alternative to Corey. Her extreme approach is not good policy and too expensive.
My wife an I would
Randall

AOL

#11 Mar 5, 2012
Of course there are people who would support another candidate. There are in every race. But I just don't think anyone believes they have a good enough chance to beat her to collect/invest several hundred thousand dollars.

Since: Feb 12

Windham, NH

#12 Mar 5, 2012
There are plenty of people in Jacksonville who would support another candidate for State Attorney. Angela is costing the taxpayers a great deal of money. First, she costs taxpayers significant money because she takes pride in taking cases to trial. I don't know what her current appeal rate is, but when she ran against Plotkin it was 25%(which is high). An appeal is costly to the taxpayers and while some cannot be avoided, many certainly can.

Angela costs the taxpayers money because of her aggressive approach to charging and trying juveniles as adults. This is expensive in both the short-term and the long-term. There are costs that are not financial associated with this practice as well. For example, look at the recidivism rates of those people who were tried and sentenced in the adult system as children versus those tried and sentenced in the juvenile system. Her approach is crippling the futures of the children of Jacksonville. The true extent of the problem will be realized in a number of years. These people are very likely to reoffend as they will have criminal records, no real supports, and they will have spent important parts of their developmental years with hardcore inmates.

So yes, the voters of Jacksonville would vote for a alternative if they were given one. Someone needs to step up to the plate who recognizes that the children really are the future. Angela's approach is outdated and is proven unsound through scientific and other empirical research.

We've tried to reason with her. She refuses to listen. If she won't listen to what 180,000 people have asked of her (thousands of them from Jacksonville by the way) then why would she listen to anything else the voters have to say? She won't.

Since: Feb 12

Windham, NH

#13 Mar 5, 2012
If the citizens of Jacksonville care about the futures of their children they will recruit and vote in a new State Attorney:

http://justice4juveniles.wordpress.com/2012/0...
alawyer

Jacksonville, FL

#14 Mar 5, 2012
Wow! How many of those cases were overturned?

Since: Feb 12

Windham, NH

#15 Mar 5, 2012
I need to correct my original statement. She has had MORE than a quarter of her cases appealed. A quarter of her cases have been REVERSED on appeal.

http://jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/082...
alawyer

Jacksonville, FL

#16 Mar 5, 2012
Thank you for the link. But I think you should also correct your statement to be murder case specific and not imply inclusion of all cases tried by her.
lol---brian

Jacksonville, FL

#17 Mar 5, 2012
Don't think Corey will be on the ballot in Pennsylvania!
in the mix

Jacksonville, FL

#18 Mar 5, 2012
melissa311 wrote:
There are plenty of people in Jacksonville who would support another candidate for State Attorney. Angela is costing the taxpayers a great deal of money. First, she costs taxpayers significant money because she takes pride in taking cases to trial. I don't know what her current appeal rate is, but when she ran against Plotkin it was 25%(which is high). An appeal is costly to the taxpayers and while some cannot be avoided, many certainly can.
Angela costs the taxpayers money because of her aggressive approach to charging and trying juveniles as adults. This is expensive in both the short-term and the long-term. There are costs that are not financial associated with this practice as well. For example, look at the recidivism rates of those people who were tried and sentenced in the adult system as children versus those tried and sentenced in the juvenile system. Her approach is crippling the futures of the children of Jacksonville. The true extent of the problem will be realized in a number of years. These people are very likely to reoffend as they will have criminal records, no real supports, and they will have spent important parts of their developmental years with hardcore inmates.
So yes, the voters of Jacksonville would vote for a alternative if they were given one. Someone needs to step up to the plate who recognizes that the children really are the future. Angela's approach is outdated and is proven unsound through scientific and other empirical research.
We've tried to reason with her. She refuses to listen. If she won't listen to what 180,000 people have asked of her (thousands of them from Jacksonville by the way) then why would she listen to anything else the voters have to say? She won't.
Melissa, you have to understand that in your insular world where everyone thinks much like you, there are many more that do not.

1. People were tired of crime here and seeing criminal routinely slapped on the hand. That is why her predecessor's heir was overwhelmingly rejected by the people.

2. You claim her prosecutions costs too much and that is why we should remove her. I would be willing to bet the money is not the issue as much as the politics. Yes, its very expensive to incarcerate someone as it should be with all the system checks and balances. However, it is far more expensive to allow society's predators to run loose.

3. You are obviously an advocate for child reform and yet you fail to understand a prime principal of reform. To reform something means to return it to a former state. If a child has never learned empathy, morals, etc., then you can't return them to a state of having them. The reality is many child criminals (not all) come from backgrounds you and many others can't begin to imagine. They range from the benign parents who are uninvolved and don't care what their kids do, to parents who use them in their crimes and encourage criminal behavior, to those who are abused cruelly (some would argue as I that the first two constitute abuse as well). A child in this environment has no standard or anchor in society to guide them. They mock your attempts at reform because they see themselves as different from society. The lack of punishment for their crimes often carries them down the road to being predators with no regards for the rights of others. They do not grasp even the most fundamental concepts of societal mores and even if they could understand they reject them outright.

The real question becomes how do you take a child who has no grasp of their place in society and get them to understand and care. With no foundation to build on its next to impossible and we must weigh their danger to the community against the time, money, and great chances (aka danger to community) you are taking in trying to reform them. If you want to fix something, fix the system that allows these parents to raise their children like this.

Since: Feb 12

Windham, NH

#19 Mar 5, 2012
I understand reform to mean you take something and make changes to it, with the underlying goal of improving it. I am not familiar with the concept you describe of returning something to its original state. I don't think that would be productive.

You said that child criminals come from a background that I cannot imagine. That's an unfounded and erroneous statement. You know nothing about my life, but I spent the better part of my childhood and teenage years with children exactly like Cristian Fernandez - some from backgrounds far worse. I have seen the other side of this coin and that is perhaps just one of the many reasons I am so passionate about this topic.

I have lived with some very dangerous children who hurt other human beings and killed animals. Not all of them were like this, but some of them were. Some of the children were prostituted out from an early age by parents who wanted money for drugs. Others told stories of their fathers killing animals in front of them when they lost their temper. And that's not getting into the extensive sexual abuse perpetrated on these kids by members of their own family in some cases.

I also know that when children are extremely resilient. While you cannot remove a child from that kind of environment and erase all of the damage, you can certainly teach a child what it means to love another person, feel compassion, demonstrate empathy, and take responsibility. I have watched children learn these concepts and apply them. I have seen their lives change dramatically. I have also seen what happens to the children who return to the original and above-described types of environments, without further intervention.

Telling me to fix the problems Jacksonville has with regard to its social services and structures is unrealistic. That needs to be fixed, no question. But I'm here talking about your State Attorney who is systematically destroying the lives of Jacksonville's youth. You can ignore that problem if you want to, but other people's refusal to address contributing factors to crime does not give her a free pass to do whatever she wants with a child's life. It just doesn't.

We are not on this earth to take or ruin the lives of our children by sentencing them to adult prison. We are here to teach our children what it means to function in society, to care for others, and to demonstrate true empathy and compassion. Angela Corey expects children to magically acquire this knowledge on their own, but that is not realistic. As adults we all have a responsibility to our children. If our community fails even a single child and we ignore it, we are all to blame.

Yes, the easy answer is to lock the child up and throw away the key. The hard answer is to take responsibility, step up, and help a lost child find his or her way. Will it work with every child? No. Does that release you from the moral and ethical obligation of trying? Absolutely not.

Since: Feb 12

Windham, NH

#20 Mar 5, 2012
"Thank you for the link. But I think you should also correct your statement to be murder case specific and not imply inclusion of all cases tried by her."

I think you just did ;)

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