astronomers get a surprise

astronomers get a surprise

Posted in the Jackson Forum

Since: Feb 13

United States

#1 Apr 5, 2013
While hunting an elusive type of black hol in the center of gloubular cluster m22, an international team of astronomers got a big surprise. This cluster is composed of hundreds of thousands of stars all orbiting a common center. In such a system the most massive stars are nearest the center, which is where astronomers normally look for black holes.
But instead of find the type of black hole that should of been there they instead discovered not one, but two. Each about 15 to 20 times our suns mass. Finding two black holes at the center of a galaxy is very surpriseing bc computer simulations suggest that gravitational interactions would have kicked all but one out of the system.
They suspect that these two black holes are stealin gas from companion white dwarfs, which are too small to see in visible or xray radiation from 10,000 light years away, but astronomers can still see the exchange of material in radio waves.
EvolutionMan

Tucker, GA

#2 Apr 5, 2013
It is awfully odd, because like you said, 2 black holes don't usually exist in a pair, one of them eventually gets slung out into space at high speeds.

We will know a lot more once the James Webb space telescope is launched.
Bloom

Lexington, TN

#3 Apr 5, 2013
Could it be a very necessary, perfectly-balanced coexistence that our corner of the Universe is precariously hung upon? Interesting.
EvolutionMan

Tucker, GA

#4 Apr 5, 2013
Bloom wrote:
Could it be a very necessary, perfectly-balanced coexistence that our corner of the Universe is precariously hung upon? Interesting.
This isn't our galaxy were talking about, but one of our neighbors.
Bloom

Lexington, TN

#5 Apr 5, 2013
Right, I gathered that. Is "corner of our Universe" not the correct way to say it? Does not the Universe contain glaxies? I dunno...most of my scientific knowledge about space comes from movies, books and Carl Sagan :)

So I don't have any knowledge to give here...interesting anyway.

But how fantastic to imagine that these two black holes need eachother?

Since: Feb 13

United States

#6 Apr 5, 2013
EvolutionMan wrote:
It is awfully odd, because like you said, 2 black holes don't usually exist in a pair, one of them eventually gets slung out into space at high speeds.
We will know a lot more once the James Webb space telescope is launched.
I would guess that maybe they both are equal in size, strenght; that their gravitorial strength sort of equals or cancels each other out. If thats the case one will eventually overpower the other i would think, depends on which one is feeding off the white dwarft.
Yeah, the Webb scope will really bring new light on the cosmos thats for sure.

Since: Feb 13

United States

#7 Apr 5, 2013
Bloom wrote:
Right, I gathered that. Is "corner of our Universe" not the correct way to say it? Does not the Universe contain glaxies? I dunno...most of my scientific knowledge about space comes from movies, books and Carl Sagan :)
So I don't have any knowledge to give here...interesting anyway.
But how fantastic to imagine that these two black holes need eachother?
Just until recently astronomers and sciencetist thought that space was like a big bubble, and if you traveled long enough that you would make a complete circle and end up where you started. Now, as recently as two months ago, most of the sciencetific community now agree that space is infinite. That means if you put space on a scale from 1 to 100% our visible knowledge is 0%. And we know of 100 billion galaxies, each with an average of 100 bilion suns, yet we actually see 0%. Thats mind blowing.

M22 cluster is in sagitarius if you know your constelations and its 10,000 light years away. Light travels at 162000 miles per second, and it takes the light from m22 10,000 years to get to earth. Man, thats wild. lol
Sorry, didnt mean to give you a astronomy class, once I get talking about cosmology, astronomy, its hard for me to shut up. lol
EvolutionMan

United States

#8 Apr 5, 2013
crawlfish wrote:
<quoted text> Just until recently astronomers and sciencetist thought that space was like a big bubble, and if you traveled long enough that you would make a complete circle and end up where you started. Now, as recently as two months ago, most of the sciencetific community now agree that space is infinite. That means if you put space on a scale from 1 to 100% our visible knowledge is 0%. And we know of 100 billion galaxies, each with an average of 100 bilion suns, yet we actually see 0%. Thats mind blowing.
M22 cluster is in sagitarius if you know your constelations and its 10,000 light years away. Light travels at 162000 miles per second, and it takes the light from m22 10,000 years to get to earth. Man, thats wild. lol
Sorry, didnt mean to give you a astronomy class, once I get talking about cosmology, astronomy, its hard for me to shut up. lol
Can you provide a source saying the universe is infinite? My understanding and research has always said that the moment after the big bang, the borders of the universe moved outwards at faster than the speed of light.

So even though the universe has been expanding faster than the speed of light for over 13.8 billion years, it doesn't mean infinite, just extraordinarily large.

Since: Feb 13

United States

#9 Apr 8, 2013
EvolutionMan wrote:
<quoted text>
Can you provide a source saying the universe is infinite? My understanding and research has always said that the moment after the big bang, the borders of the universe moved outwards at faster than the speed of light.
So even though the universe has been expanding faster than the speed of light for over 13.8 billion years, it doesn't mean infinite, just extraordinarily large.
It was in the march or feb issue of astronomy magizene, sorry, dont remember which one. But it was one of those two. In matter of fact in the same issue they are thinking now that the 'big bang' was just a 'local' thing, and that there are several 'big bangs' that have happened elsewhere in space and may still be occuring elsewhere as we speak. I tend to believe this theory also.

Since: Mar 13

Jackson, TN

#10 Apr 8, 2013
There is some debate between the measurement of the observable universe vs the amount we can not see due to nothing that generates something we can measure being there

Since: Feb 13

United States

#11 Apr 8, 2013
another viewer wrote:
There is some debate between the measurement of the observable universe vs the amount we can not see due to nothing that generates something we can measure being there
Thats true, in the same article it said that if you measure what we see compared to what we cannot see, we see 0% of space. Thats wicked.
EvolutionMan

Tucker, GA

#12 Apr 8, 2013
another viewer wrote:
There is some debate between the measurement of the observable universe vs the amount we can not see due to nothing that generates something we can measure being there
We haven't even been able to see to the cosmic fog yet, so ill hold on to make assumptions till after we launch the jwst.

Current understanding says we can't see past the cosmic fog, due to the fact that light could not escape it.

Since: Feb 13

United States

#13 Apr 9, 2013
Fun facts about the cosmos.
As pluto orbits the sun which planet does it come closest to? It comes closer to uranus than neptune. The reason is fasinating. Pluto makes two orbits around the sun as neptune makes three. Their gravity connects them in a strange way that keeps them permantely apart.

What naked eye object regularly wanishes for millions of years? The andromeda galaxy just barely escapes being hidden behind lightyears of dusty nearby gas bc its only 13 degrees from the center line of the milky way. Earth gets carried every 110 million years to where our galaxys central bulge blocks adromeda for a few million years.
Which two planets have the greatest chance of collideing? Vensus and Mercury. Vensus has a almost perfect circular orbit around the sun, Mercury has the most loopsided, and wildly changes shape. Giant juiptures gravity, even though juipture is so far away, will eventually make mercurys orbit so elliptical that it will swing out and eventually collide with vensus.

Which well know celestial body has the shorest life expectancy? Mars moon phobos, the closest moon to any planet, if falling. Research shows that the moon will crash into mars in about 10 million years.
What is the name of our sun and moon? Luna, and Sol.
Jon

Savannah, TN

#14 Apr 9, 2013
God has created such an awesome universe!

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