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CITIZEN

Independence, KS

#1 Jul 16, 2013
Did anyone hear anything about a drug bust in a trailer park on W Laurel last week. Getting ready to move into that neighborhood and wondered if I should be concerned for my small grandchildren
Yep

Seattle, WA

#2 Jul 16, 2013
CITIZEN wrote:
Did anyone hear anything about a drug bust in a trailer park on W Laurel last week. Getting ready to move into that neighborhood and wondered if I should be concerned for my small grandchildren
Yes, you should be REAL concerned. I lived in that area for two years, got worse by the month. The trailer parks I believe are owned by McBride and some people who own a construction company, Lang I believe, neither are worth salt. Honestly, I would see about getting my money back and not move into that area of town.

Since: Oct 10

Independence, Kansas

#3 Jul 16, 2013
CITIZEN wrote:
Did anyone hear anything about a drug bust in a trailer park on W Laurel last week. Getting ready to move into that neighborhood and wondered if I should be concerned for my small grandchildren
It doesn't matter where you move in Independence, you should always be concerned about your children or grandchildren's welfare. Drugs know no socio-economic boundries and drug abuse can be found almost anywhere. The more involved you are with your youngsters lives, the less chance they have to become involved with drug abuse and the lifestyle that comes with it.
Yep

Seattle, WA

#4 Jul 16, 2013
Indy_Dick wrote:
<quoted text>It doesn't matter where you move in Independence, you should always be concerned about your children or grandchildren's welfare. Drugs know no socio-economic boundries and drug abuse can be found almost anywhere. The more involved you are with your youngsters lives, the less chance they have to become involved with drug abuse and the lifestyle that comes with it.
Yep, well said Indy. However, the west side is one of those hot spots as I call them for higher than normal activities. Again, well said!
ha ha

Jefferson City, MO

#5 Jul 16, 2013
Yep wrote:
<quoted text>
Yep, well said Indy. However, the west side is one of those hot spots as I call them for higher than normal activities. Again, well said!
the white hood...
Geeks go live for dope

United States

#6 Jul 17, 2013
Meth meth meth
Don't matter which hood, the whole town is ate up
destroy their lives

Windsor, MO

#7 Jul 17, 2013
Geeks go live for dope wrote:
Meth meth meth
Don't matter which hood, the whole town is ate up
and we are going to stop it how ? put them in prison, not probation. At least a minimum mandatory 10 year sentence for selling it. 3 strikes - life in prison. At least some might change when their buddies are gone for 10 years. Or we could just shoot the dealers...and throw them down the wishing well.
methhater

Chanute, KS

#8 Jul 18, 2013
Prison won't work. Has it worked to date? No. And, by the way, who pays for all these prison stays anyway? Any idea? We do, the working stiffs. Plenty have done 10 years for meth and guess what? when they got out, they couldn't find jobs because they are felons, out of the work system for 10 plus years, nobody wants to hire them, or, they just don't want to work in the first place. Why? Well I suppose sitting around for 10 years would make a person lazy. So what do they do? Go right back to dealing in the meth trade. That's what they know. Get caught up in it again and right back thru the system again. There is no rehabilitation going on in the prison system.
Food for Thought

Independence, KS

#9 Jul 18, 2013
Then just dig a hole and throw them in then. Prison may not rehabilitate, but at least they're not messing with the rest of society.
Burnett-Lignon

Dallas, TX

#10 Jul 18, 2013
CITIZEN wrote:
Did anyone hear anything about a drug bust in a trailer park on W Laurel last week. Getting ready to move into that neighborhood and wondered if I should be concerned for my small grandchildren
Montgomery County Chronicle reported 3 people arrested June 12 for drug selling & possession, at 1719 W Laurel, Lots 4 & 8.

Since: Oct 10

Independence, Kansas

#11 Jul 18, 2013
methhater wrote:
Prison won't work. Has it worked to date? No. And, by the way, who pays for all these prison stays anyway? Any idea? We do, the working stiffs. Plenty have done 10 years for meth and guess what? when they got out, they couldn't find jobs because they are felons, out of the work system for 10 plus years, nobody wants to hire them, or, they just don't want to work in the first place. Why? Well I suppose sitting around for 10 years would make a person lazy. So what do they do? Go right back to dealing in the meth trade. That's what they know. Get caught up in it again and right back thru the system again. There is no rehabilitation going on in the prison system.
Guess what? Probation doesn't work either...same list of people are constantly being violated on their probations over and over again.

I don't know what the solution is, but it doesn't look like probation works very well either.
Burnett-Lignon

Dallas, TX

#12 Jul 18, 2013
Indy_Dick wrote:
<quoted text>Guess what? Probation doesn't work either...same list of people are constantly being violated on their probations over and over again.
I don't know what the solution is, but it doesn't look like probation works very well either.
I suspect the solution is legal marijuana and prescription meth.
methhater

Chanute, KS

#13 Jul 18, 2013
Burnett-Lignon wrote:
<quoted text>I suspect the solution is legal marijuana and prescription meth.
Actually, I think you are right! It would have to provide a good "rush" in order to wean tweakers off the old stuff. But, it would be "clean" pharmaceutical drugs. Like the old 'black beauties','white cross','preludes', etc. Sell it and tax it to 21 years and older. The drugs are here to stay. We just have to figure out how to adapt better policies going forward. Prohibition just don't work in the land of the "free"!
Now What

United States

#15 Jul 18, 2013
One word that scares the hell out of these people is the word WORK.I say instead of putting them in an air conditioned jail,bring back the old chain gangs instead of probation.Put them all along the highways and county roads cutting weeds and picking up trash from daylight to dark seven days a week for as long as there sentence is.I dont think they would want to do that to many times.

Since: Oct 10

Independence, Kansas

#16 Jul 18, 2013
methhater wrote:
<quoted text>Actually, I think you are right! It would have to provide a good "rush" in order to wean tweakers off the old stuff. But, it would be "clean" pharmaceutical drugs. Like the old 'black beauties','white cross','preludes', etc. Sell it and tax it to 21 years and older. The drugs are here to stay. We just have to figure out how to adapt better policies going forward. Prohibition just don't work in the land of the "free"!
How is that going to work? Someone using drugs is not going to be hired by a company. The company would be liable for any on the job accidents that happened by employees that are on drugs. Insurance costs would go up.

You are going to tell us that everything will be just fine if only the drugs were sold legally just like liquor. Alcoholics usually can't hold down a job, what makes you think someone who is using drugs is going to do any better? Employers want employees whose head is in the game and will report to work on time. The side effects of pot and meth are well documented. Given the choice of employing a person who chooses not to use drugs and one that does, what do you think an employer would do? If YOU were the employer, would you hire someone who choses to use drugs? If YOU were an employee, would you want a person who choses to use drugs working next to you with dangerous tools or machinery? If you were driving in the other lane of traffic would YOU want someone who choses to use drugs in the other lane of traffic?

Call me a skeptic. If a person can't hold down a job because they chose to use drugs (legal or not), then how are they going to pay for their habit?

I know the answer, do you?
whatever_28

Independence, KS

#17 Jul 18, 2013
I'm sure h. the h.n.i.c. the person that runs the big circus of his total obedience of his people under him for the ipd will do what there told as usual since there t stupid to think for themselves he is f worthtless.Like the rest of the city under morons,you ask them whats the city goal at meetings. They act like retards we don;t know,these f ing idiots have jobs great for indy huh. Fire them
whatever_28

Independence, KS

#18 Jul 18, 2013
After my latest stroke hope for more. As I'm old why would anybody want to work with such bastards in my day . If you work for the water department you work well doing things,you work for the street department you work together. If you work EMS fire dept. it's a self support thing. So how is it lets say a life and death department can;t get along because of retardation of policies. So how are expected to ge along in life or death situations. Let's say I am a armed security guard have to shoot somebody in self defense,but have another security guy with me who doent care as long his job will go beyond mine as long as he made the best choice. Of control,and patience

Since: Jan 12

Independence, KS

#19 Jul 19, 2013
Indy_Dick wrote:
<quoted text>How is that going to work? Someone using drugs is not going to be hired by a company. The company would be liable for any on the job accidents that happened by employees that are on drugs. Insurance costs would go up.
You are going to tell us that everything will be just fine if only the drugs were sold legally just like liquor. Alcoholics usually can't hold down a job, what makes you think someone who is using drugs is going to do any better? Employers want employees whose head is in the game and will report to work on time. The side effects of pot and meth are well documented. Given the choice of employing a person who chooses not to use drugs and one that does, what do you think an employer would do? If YOU were the employer, would you hire someone who choses to use drugs? If YOU were an employee, would you want a person who choses to use drugs working next to you with dangerous tools or machinery? If you were driving in the other lane of traffic would YOU want someone who choses to use drugs in the other lane of traffic?
Call me a skeptic. If a person can't hold down a job because they chose to use drugs (legal or not), then how are they going to pay for their habit?
I know the answer, do you?
Legalizing these drugs would not solve all of the drug-related employment problems, but it would be a huge improvement over what we have today. The biggest bar to gainful employment for casual drug users is their criminal record, not their impaired ability, and legalization would remove the criminal stigma. I know many people whose only criminal activity is the purchase of their recreational drugs, and most of them have not been caught. Colorado will provide much useful information as their legal pot sales are implemented.

The biggest benefit of legalization would be the withdrawal of the criminal element from the supply chains, as organized crime and cartels lost their profit motive, just as bootleggers did in the past. Also we would save hundreds of billions of dollars from no longer needed enforcement, judicial and confinement activities.

Obviously there would be some problems with addicts and related illegal activities, which would require social services, but we already try to provide that on a huge scale, in many cases to clients who don't need it. Just as alcohol has its social problems, so would legal drugs.

I can't see how anyone could think our current drug enforcement practices are working effectively or who would want to continue them as they are. Obviously no solution is perfect, but we need to implement legalization and let the law evolve.

Since: Oct 10

Independence, Kansas

#20 Jul 19, 2013
burnett-lignon wrote:
<quoted text>Legalizing these drugs would not solve all of the drug-related employment problems, but it would be a huge improvement over what we have today. The biggest bar to gainful employment for casual drug users is their criminal record, not their impaired ability, and legalization would remove the criminal stigma. I know many people whose only criminal activity is the purchase of their recreational drugs, and most of them have not been caught. Colorado will provide much useful information as their legal pot sales are implemented.
The biggest benefit of legalization would be the withdrawal of the criminal element from the supply chains, as organized crime and cartels lost their profit motive, just as bootleggers did in the past. Also we would save hundreds of billions of dollars from no longer needed enforcement, judicial and confinement activities.
Obviously there would be some problems with addicts and related illegal activities, which would require social services, but we already try to provide that on a huge scale, in many cases to clients who don't need it. Just as alcohol has its social problems, so would legal drugs.
I can't see how anyone could think our current drug enforcement practices are working effectively or who would want to continue them as they are. Obviously no solution is perfect, but we need to implement legalization and let the law evolve.
I have to disagree with your assumption that legalization would be an improvement over what we have today with regard to employment practices. A person that comes to work high is a hazard to themselves and their fellow employees. It is easy to tell if a person comes to work drunk; you can smell it. There is not an easy way to tell if a person is under the influence of pot or other drugs that could be legalized in the future. The reflexes of a person under the influence are slower and judgment could also be affected. This fact could be a cause for higher risks of employee injury and the related lost production time as well as higher insurance costs. These additional costs are usually passed on to the consumer in the form of higher prices for the product that is being produced.

The "state" legalizing certain drugs implies the right to use them. Will employers have to let employees work while high? The effects of drugs don't immediately wear off. If an employee comes to work high, the employer will not be likely to know about this fact until it is too late.

I realize that not all employees that would use drugs under a system of new legalization laws would risk coming to work high, but there would be some that would do just that. Would an employer have the right to send an employee home if they thought them high? How would the employer prove it? Who would bear the costs of lost production? Could a person be fired for coming to work high?
harsh crime harsh price

Windsor, MO

#21 Jul 19, 2013
methhater wrote:
Prison won't work. Has it worked to date? No. And, by the way, who pays for all these prison stays anyway? Any idea? We do, the working stiffs. Plenty have done 10 years for meth and guess what? when they got out, they couldn't find jobs because they are felons, out of the work system for 10 plus years, nobody wants to hire them, or, they just don't want to work in the first place. Why? Well I suppose sitting around for 10 years would make a person lazy. So what do they do? Go right back to dealing in the meth trade. That's what they know. Get caught up in it again and right back thru the system again. There is no rehabilitation going on in the prison system.
then execute them if they do it again - it'd be alot cheaper and might dissuade the rest

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