reason blacks pull pants down

reason blacks pull pants down

Posted in the Huntington Forum

Zeeko

New York, NY

#1 Oct 2, 2013
I found this :(copy and paste)Even more than the misappropriation of the word “kngga” as a term of endearment, the cultural phenomenon of sagging pants speaks exclusively to the institutionalized brainwashing of black America.

If hip-hop is the voice of a generation, ass-sagging pants is the uniform. And both are rooted in a rebellion so entrenched that many black men proudly regurgitate, through words and attire, the tell-tale sign of psychological ownership. If we could delve beneath the often exploitative lyrics of poverty, violence, drug consumption and slangin’, we might recognize that the price tags on our youth’s sagging jeans are nothing more than potential inmate numbers in disguise.

“In prison you aren't allowed to wear belts to prevent self-hanging or the hanging of others,” Judge Greg Mathis said in a 2007 interview for Jetmagazine. "They take the belt and sometimes your pants hang down.... Many cultures of the prison have overflowed into the community unfortunately,” continued Mathis, who spent time in Detroit’s Wayne County Jail as a youth.“Those who pulled their pants down the lowest and showed their behind a little more raw, that was an invitation.[The youth] don't know this part about it."
Nancy

Chesapeake, VA

#2 Oct 2, 2013
Another "copy and paste" telling Sagging pants and littering neighbors aren't stopping young Black men from getting jobs. It's racial, social and class inequality that's stopping them. It's the lack of educational and economic opportunities available to them. It's the disproportionate incarceration of young black men and the 700,000 stop-and-frisks on New York City streets. Unfortunately, what Lemon's analysis does is confuse cause and effect. That's because it's a lot easier to focus on the effects – the street issues – than to deal with the cause – entrenched systemic and institutional barriers that restrict opportunities for African-Americans.


In a country where white unemployment has never reached 10 percent since the Great Depression but Black unemployment has only rarely dipped below 10 percent since records have been kept, our problems are not sartorial but structural. In fact, if white unemployment remained at the level it has for Blacks over the past 40 years, we'd launch a new "New Deal" program to get people back to work. We'd invest in job training and education and encourage home ownership, just as the nation did with the GI bill after World War II. But that's not happening.


The truth is that jobs won't miraculously come to Black kids if they pull up their pants. Justin Bieber gets to prance around with sagging pants as often as he wants. Mark Zuckerberg can wear a hoodie without ever being accused of being "suspicious." White kids on college campuses can listen to the hardest rap music without being called "thugs." White kids get to be kids. They get to go through "phases," to listen to bad music, to wear stupid clothing and to make mistakes. But then they get to grow up and become successful adults. Black kids, on the other hand, don't often get the benefit of the doubt, the second chances and the opportunities that come along with it.


To be clear, I'm not making excuses for Black kids or assuming they're all the same. I'm just not blaming them for forces beyond their control. Like most African-American parents, I want my kids to be productive members of society. I don't want them to use racism as an excuse for failing to try. But I also don't want them to think that the burden to fix our community is theirs alone. If we really want to practice tough love in America, as Don Lemon argues, then we should start by examining the priorities of the adults in our larger society, not by knocking our kids.
Lycan

Huntington, IN

#3 Oct 2, 2013
What a load of crock.

"Jobs won`t miraculously come to black kids if they pull up thier pants. Justin beiber gets to prance around with sagging pants"

Are you mental? Your comment begs to assume the problem is fashion. The problem is mentality. For starters, having the mentality "not" to want dress like a thug would make a large improvement. Black rappers sag thier pants because they don`t work. Justin does it because he don`t work. Blacks immulate BET, not Obama (who doesn`t sag his pants).
Any individual with the mentality to intentionally dress like a thug, but is a go getter and over achiever already knows that you don`t dress like a thug in the 1st place.

"Zuckerburg can wear a hoodie without looking suspicious"

Even Fucking crippled Steven Hawkings would look suspicious in a hoodie in a high crime area at night going through peoples yards in his hoover round. Don`t try to play the race card.
Lycan

Huntington, IN

#4 Oct 2, 2013
Nancy- "I`m not making excuses for black kids"

Re-read your damn post.
You blamed racial, social and class structure.
You blamed the lack of education and economic oppertunities.
You blamed the Criminal arrest rate.
And you blamed banks all in the 1st paragraph. Which you litterally said "is stopping" black people.
Then you blamed white college kids fashion sense as if you had a point to make.
Then you blamed the label or brand "thug".
And my favorite exuse, "forces beyond thier control".
Which was your whole rant by the way.

When is it ever the individuals fault?
Your post is what is wrong with black people in the 1st place.
Go Browns

Columbus, OH

#5 Oct 2, 2013
This was started in prison as a way to let others know you are gay. Also if you were a bi@#h you would be forced to wearing your pants like this so everyone in the prison knows you were taken.
Derper

Huntington, WV

#6 Oct 2, 2013
Nancy wrote:
Another "copy and paste" telling Sagging pants and littering neighbors aren't stopping young Black men from getting jobs. It's racial, social and class inequality that's stopping them. It's the lack of educational and economic opportunities available to them. It's the disproportionate incarceration of young black men and the 700,000 stop-and-frisks on New York City streets. Unfortunately, what Lemon's analysis does is confuse cause and effect. That's because it's a lot easier to focus on the effects – the street issues – than to deal with the cause – entrenched systemic and institutional barriers that restrict opportunities for African-Americans.
In a country where white unemployment has never reached 10 percent since the Great Depression but Black unemployment has only rarely dipped below 10 percent since records have been kept, our problems are not sartorial but structural. In fact, if white unemployment remained at the level it has for Blacks over the past 40 years, we'd launch a new "New Deal" program to get people back to work. We'd invest in job training and education and encourage home ownership, just as the nation did with the GI bill after World War II. But that's not happening.
The truth is that jobs won't miraculously come to Black kids if they pull up their pants. Justin Bieber gets to prance around with sagging pants as often as he wants. Mark Zuckerberg can wear a hoodie without ever being accused of being "suspicious." White kids on college campuses can listen to the hardest rap music without being called "thugs." White kids get to be kids. They get to go through "phases," to listen to bad music, to wear stupid clothing and to make mistakes. But then they get to grow up and become successful adults. Black kids, on the other hand, don't often get the benefit of the doubt, the second chances and the opportunities that come along with it.
To be clear, I'm not making excuses for Black kids or assuming they're all the same. I'm just not blaming them for forces beyond their control. Like most African-American parents, I want my kids to be productive members of society. I don't want them to use racism as an excuse for failing to try. But I also don't want them to think that the burden to fix our community is theirs alone. If we really want to practice tough love in America, as Don Lemon argues, then we should start by examining the priorities of the adults in our larger society, not by knocking our kids.
Nancy, you say this is "copy and paste". From where? Who wrote this piece you posted? Thanks...
Tyrone

Barboursville, WV

#7 Oct 2, 2013
i rember when i was in jail, one day i started sagging my pants and the next think i know, i was getting rammed from behind by my cell mate named Bubba, i enjoyed it so i started sagging my pants all the time!
Araingedporriage

Howell, MI

#8 Apr 9, 2014
I started doing it because I saw other blacks doing it And I wanted to seem more black..
lazy j

AOL

#9 Apr 10, 2014
dose that mean they are gay
Rick

New Haven, WV

#10 Apr 10, 2014
Meaning they are available for butt sex and an invitation for a prison mack daddy. Lol
1 post removed
Pop

Ashland, KY

#12 Apr 10, 2014
I didnt know it was to show they were Gay i always thought it was because their ass stink and they were airing it off !!!!!,
The Last Warrior Poet

Philadelphia, PA

#13 Apr 10, 2014
Tyrone wrote:
i rember when i was in jail, one day i started sagging my pants and the next think i know, i was getting rammed from behind by my cell mate named Bubba, i enjoyed it so i started sagging my pants all the time!
. I enjoy it so much I don't even wear pants
1 post removed
Walter

New Haven, WV

#15 Apr 11, 2014
Does everybody have a cell mate named Bubba?

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