the Streets of Moneyton
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alligator jackson

United States

#1 Mar 20, 2014
Here is an excerpt from my non-fiction book on Huntington's drug problem called The Streets of Moneyton

THE FLAWED LOCAL JUDICIAL SYSTEM



The judicial system is allowing drug addicts, drug dealers, and other offenders back on the streets too soon. Magistrates, judges, prosecutors, and lawyers are using the excuse that jails or prisons are overcrowded and then are cutting deals to put offenders back on the streets to commit more crimes.

My main concern is that the courts are being used to generate money. The courts make money even if the case never reaches court, because once the suspect is arrested, they have to post bond to get out. Then, if the case never gets picked up by the grand jury or never gets called to court, the money remains with the court system.

For instance, if someone pays $500 to get out on bond, they do not get the money back. They are thankful if they never have to go to court and risk going to prison or paying a higher fine, but that money disappears into the court system.

Therefore, if that is true, the court is making money although justice is not served. The criminal gets someone in their family to bond them out and they are back on the street with no real penalty, free to pilfer and loot. The courts ring up a profit. Meanwhile, no lesson is learned by anyone and the public is at risk. As history shows, the criminal will look for more victims. Meanwhile, the public is left to be the victim in the criminal’s next stunt.

The court basically gives the criminal the opportunity to steal or hurt again as the court clerk sticks the bond money into the cash register and happily goes onto the next case. Who says crime does not pay? It surely does not for the victim but often does for the criminal and certainly does for the judicial system.

An article in the December 28, 2013, Herald-Dispatch entitled "Heroin: A Growing Concern" by David E. Malloy stated:

"Cabell County Prosecutor Chris Chiles has seen a similar increase in heroin cases coming across his desk. While some lawmakers in Ohio and Kentucky are calling for tougher sentences, Chiles said he has mixed feelings on the issue.
"I don't know if it will do that much good," he said. "A heroin addict isn't thinking about consequences. We already have overcrowded prisons. I don't know what the answer is."
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alligator jackson

United States

#3 Mar 20, 2014
INTRO

The Hillbilly Highway was alive and well in the fifties and sixties and full of dreams as Appalachians happily followed the path to Detroit in search of jobs in the booming auto factories.

Decades later, The Hillbilly Highway is alive again this time with the hollow ambition and poison of Detroit drug dealers. The drug dealers leave the competition of the streets of Detroit and head to the mountains of Appalachia to supply the high demand.

The Hillbilly Highway was a road filled with dreams. Now, it is a road full of nightmares. It's kind of a dream killer.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of drug dealers have landed in Huntington, West Virginia. The demand is so high in Huntington that the drug dealers have branded Huntington as 'Moneyton' and nearby Ashland, Ky as 'Cashland'.

The original nickname given to Huntington was 'Munnington'. Jail guards in the nineties noticed that as their jail began filling up with Detroit drug dealers that their knuckles were tattooed with a letter on each knuckle: M-u-n-n-I-n-g-t-o-n. the nickname spun into Moneyton.
The demand is so high the poison commands top dollar. In fact, the demand for painkillers and the low availability has driven the cost of OxyContin way up.

The streets of Moneyton are full of Pill Zombies, Meth Mouths, Crack Heads, and Needle Jockeys or Heroin Junkies.

The drug problem is not limited to Huntington, or Appalachia, for that matter. The drug plague has reached near epidemic proportions across the country. The disturbing factor about Huntington is the clouds of complacent attitude or denial that hangs over the city.

The attitude was evident in Huntington's 2012's mayoral election. Incumbent Mayor Kim Wolfe bragged that crime rates were the lowest since the eighties and crime was down. While Mayor Wolfe bragged about Huntington's streets being safer the streets of Moneyton started loading up with heroin.

Ironically, on Election Day 2012 (the day Wolfe was defeated in his re-election bid), the streets of Moneyton erupted with the news that two Detroit drug dealers were murdered in a house in Huntington.
alligator jackson

United States

#4 Mar 20, 2014
Heroin is an epidemic which is raging across our country hitting cities and small towns. Just like in towns in New Jersey, Illinois, and ther states, heroin has taken over the streets of Moneyton. More Huntington residents than ever before have turned to the drug, driven by the decreased availability of prescription opiates. The nation as a whole has become more aware of the toll of prescription drug abuse in recent years, leading to a reformulation of the popular OxyContin, the creation of prescription drug-monitoring programs, and a new reluctance among doctors to write prescriptions for unnecessary opiates.

With new obstacles in place, many who had become dependent on opiate painkillers found themselves turning to the cheaper, more readily available heroin as a substitute.

Heroin kills by reacting with the part of the brain that controls breathing, slowing it down so much that it might also stop it altogether. In other words, it depresses the respiratory system to the point of not breathing.

There are several ways heroin kills. One way is simply using way too much of the drug and overwhelming the users' body.

Another way is by mixing heroin with alcohol or other drugs. Heroin and alcohol both suppress the impulse to breathe. Combining heroin with Xanax also has the same deadly effect. A speedball using cocaine, an upper, and heroin, a downer, can stop the heart.

Heroin can be deadly because each batch has a different level of purity. It's not exactly how much heroin a person does that can determine if they overdose or not but how pure the heroin is. If a person is not use to pure heroin, they can easily overdose. A common mistake is a user is used to doing a fifty from one dealer but then buys a fifty from another dealer next time and because that batch is more pure, they may overdose.

A user that has not shot up heroin in a while may overdose easy. If a person has not used in a while, their tolerance level has dropped and their body cannot handle as much heroin as they used to be able to do. Thus,a person can do the same amount they did just a few months before and it can kill them.

Heroin is often ‘cut’ with other substances in order to make the amount the dealer has gone further.
Items such as sugar and salt or powdered milk are often used as substitutes for heroin in the cutting process. However, less scrupulous persons may also make a concoction based on heroin plus drain cleaner, detergent, bleach powders, or even rat poison. All of the latter types of substances can cause severe reactions within the user, sometimes leading to an ‘overdose’. Death by strychnine poisoning (strychnine being the common ingredient in rat poison) has occurred among batches of drug users.

The poison can give the user an extra kick that they may think is the heroin but is actually the poison.

The injection of heroin requires needles which spreads dangerous diseases such as Hepatitis and HIV.
alligator jackson

United States

#5 Mar 20, 2014
We need to have absolute leadership in the war against drugs. In Huntington, we need for Mayor Steve Williams to raise awareness that we are indeed fighting a war on drugs. Instead of trying to paint a rosy picture so that it looks like he is doing a wonderful job as Mayor, he needs to try to raise awareness that we may be in the midst of an epidemic drug problem. By helping to win the war on drugs in Huntington, the mayor can become a true hero.

Mr. Williams needs to work with our local media. The Herald-Dispatch should devote a Sunday edition to telling the truth about how drugs have impacted the area. The Herald-Dispatch should interview drug addicts that lost their jobs, families, and homes because of their drug use. The paper could feature stories on parents that have lost children and talk about how drugs has destroyed their families.

Reporters could talk to counselors and offer suggestions on how to live with and help loved ones who are addicted. The paper could talk about repeat offenders and how they are bogging down the judicial system. They can talk about how drug use is leading to an increase in crime such as robbery and breaking and enterings. They can discuss how are tax dollars are paying for the overcrowding of jails and prisons.

By declaring war on drugs, our area would be raising awareness on the fact we do have a problem. With Mayor Williams has a leader, we could have a plan. Local government officials and local celebrities could give speeches in our schools and to other groups about the dangers of drug use and how to detect drug problems and what we must to do to defeat the problem.

Mayor Williams should bring together other community leaders for a summit on drug abuse. He should encourage all churches to ban together against the drug problem. The churches can spread awareness about the problem but also help detect where problems are. With extra eyes focusing on the problem, there will be more tips made to the police. Plus, drug dealers will be afraid if they know that everyone is aware of the drug problem and that people are watching them and calling the police and drug tip lines. If the public simply refuses to allow dealers to operate by notifying the police when they are aware of a drug house, then dealers and their customers are going to find themselves on the run.

I'm sure that local authorities work with officials from Detroit and other times about the heroin pipeline that runs from Detroit into our area. There should be even more cooperation with these officials and the word should be spread about how law enforcement is watching these areas. Maybe if drug dealers are aware that authorities are monitoring their actions, maybe it will deter plans to try to move drugs into our area.

The Huntington Police Department is doing a fine job in combating drugs. They need more help. The judicial system can help reduce the amount of repeat offenders by reducing the plea bargaining the courts do. Too many drug offenders are plea bargaining and getting back on the streets to deal or take more drugs. It is like catch and release. The offenders are caught but they slide through the cracks in the judicial system and return to breaking the law.

The bottom line is that the mayor needs to unite us and lead us against drugs. Drug abuse causes many problems like broken families, increase in robberies and other crime, loss of life, high school dropout, increase in violent crimes and shootings, and prison and jail overcrowding. If the city pulls together and makes eliminating drugs a priority, we can make a difference. This is your Huntington, this is my Huntington, this is our Huntington…let’s take it back from the drug dealers.

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#6 Mar 20, 2014
The war on drugs is a joke, just like Alligator Jackson.
alligator jackson

United States

#7 Mar 20, 2014
-zaphod- wrote:
The war on drugs is a joke, just like Alligator Jackson.
Zaphod, they got another dealer off of the street today. One less drug dealer. You must laugh a lot because everything is a joke to you lol

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#8 Mar 20, 2014
alligator jackson wrote:
<quoted text>Zaphod, they got another dealer off of the street today. One less drug dealer. You must laugh a lot because everything is a joke to you lol
Everything you say seems to be a joke. The drug dealers are there due to the demand. Making drugs illegal hasn't brought demand down one single bit. Throwing good money after bad fighting a losing battle is pretty dumb.
alligator jackson

United States

#9 Mar 20, 2014
-zaphod- wrote:
<quoted text>Everything you say seems to be a joke. The drug dealers are there due to the demand. Making drugs illegal hasn't brought demand down one single bit. Throwing good money after bad fighting a losing battle is pretty dumb.
Each drug dealer you take off the streets saves lives
Believe it or not drugs Jill. I helped save a person two weeks ago that had stopped breathing. Oh yeah, I forgot that like someone said in another thread: I just write books I don't get my hands dirty
Levonne Spuke

Huntington, WV

#10 Mar 20, 2014
Get rid of the kneegurs.
Mr Mayor

Huntington, WV

#11 Mar 20, 2014
Alligator Jackson,
Why don't you toss your name in the ring to be the next police chief since you know so much about the drug issues Huntington faces.
alligator jackson

United States

#12 Mar 20, 2014
Mr Mayor wrote:
Alligator Jackson,
Why don't you toss your name in the ring to be the next police chief since you know so much about the drug issues Huntington faces.
Why, yes, I believe I will. It's hard to turn down a job offer on topix
LoL

London, KY

#13 Mar 20, 2014
For every drug dealer they arrest there are at least 5-10 to replace them.. My point Is what you just wasted your time writing is already known..

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#14 Mar 20, 2014
alligator jackson wrote:
<quoted text>Why, yes, I believe I will. It's hard to turn down a job offer on topix
Just remember that you can't employ anyone you know, ever knew, or are related to. No matter how competent that person might be : you don't want to be accused of cronyism.
alligator jackson

United States

#15 Mar 20, 2014
-zaphod- wrote:
<quoted text>Just remember that you can't employ anyone you know, ever knew, or are related to. No matter how competent that person might be : you don't want to be accused of cronyism.
Oh geez Zaphod. We are back to this again. It's not cronyism if you hire someone you know. It is cronyism to fire or demote someone doing a good job (fire chief), bring back a position that had been eliminated and give it to one of your supporters (the hot dog boy as ass public works director) or create a position for someone you know.
alligator jackson

United States

#16 Mar 20, 2014
LoL wrote:
For every drug dealer they arrest there are at least 5-10 to replace them.. My point Is what you just wasted your time writing is already known..
Actually, I think we can win

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#17 Mar 20, 2014
alligator jackson wrote:
<quoted text>Actually, I think we can win
Yeah
Because the only reason that the war on drugs hasn't worked so far is due to small town mayors.

Alligator Jackson needs someone to supply him with a dose of reality.
alligator jackson

United States

#18 Mar 20, 2014
It has worked. Check out Appalachian Dawn about Manchester Ky

Since: Jan 14

Location hidden

#19 Mar 20, 2014
alligator jackson

United States

#20 Mar 20, 2014
From the book
"Appalachian Dawn" was a documentary made about Manchester, Ky. A few years ago the community was drowning in drugs. The town, led by the religious community, came together and basically drove the dealers out.

Druggies cleaned up because they knew their neighbors were no longer going to tolerate. After a few dealers were busted, most of the other dealers scrambled to get out of town.

By pulling together, Huntington can change the culture. Those who will not change will get reported. This can lower the demand for drugs. Once users see they will be shunned or reported then they will realize they have to change.

This has to be an across the board effort. Schools, churches, and parents will have to speak to children about drugs and explain why they are sociably unacceptable.

Together, the community can change the "snitches get stitches mentality" that plagues our youth. We can adapt a "be drug free or be gone" attitude.
If the streets of Moneyton are cleaned up, there are going to be a lot of sick people in Huntington. If the cleanup is done by taking away the supply of drugs, then addicts will not have any choice than to seek treatment. If it is done at once, then the supply of the treatment will not be able to keep up with the demand. Hopefully, the cleanup will come as a result of taking away the demand for drugs.

If the demand for drugs is taken away, then, that will happen over a period of time and will result in the changing of the overall culture and by addicts deciding that they no longer wish to be addicts. The only way to take away the demand for drugs is to change the environment in Huntington and to treat as many addicts as possible.
alligator jackson

United States

#21 Mar 20, 2014
I could take the money given out to just one position Mayor Steve created for a friend ($50,000) and put a dent in Huntington's drug problem

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