the real tragedy of drugs

the real tragedy of drugs

Posted in the Huntington Forum

alligator jackson

United States

#1 Dec 18, 2013
Huntington fell farther behind in its' drug war this week. Another week, another shooting death by a Michigan gunman. The 27th Street shooting grabbed the news headlines this week but it was a silent story that was the most gut wrenching.

The real heartbreaking story did not appear on WSAZ. The Herald-Dispatch did not print the saddest bomb dropped in the local drug war.

Last weekend, the bodies of a mother and father were found in The west end of Huntington by the girl's father and their small children. They had overdosed on Heroin.

This story is not an urban myth. I verified the story. I know the names. The bodies are at the examiners office in Charleston. I'm not printing the names out of respect for the families involved but the story needs to be told.

The shootings will always find their way to the front page. The Huntington shootings in the past few years have primarily involved drug dealers and drug users. It is a nasty symptom of a city with a drug problem. So it may sound mean when I say those type of murders will happen and we should be glad that it is not innocent residents being robbed and killed for drug money; but deep inside, we know its true.

Drug users and drug dealers kill each other,that's a fact that we've learned to live with. It is a risk of the lifestyle that we have accepted that comes with the territory. It's kind of like if you want to play, you've got to pay. If you are a drug dealer or user that wants to be a gangster or player, it is part of the risk.

But the children who lost their parents did not accept the risk. They were robbed anyway. They were robbed of being walked to class the first day of school with their parents; they were robbed of Christmas mornings opening presents while their parents snapped pictures; they were robbed of a father to play catch with and a mother to help with homework; they were robbed of a parent to walk them down the aisle or of a grand parent for their children. They were sentenced to a lifetime of not having the people that brought them into the world to hold their hand when they are sick or be proud of them in their accomplishments.

When the parents are buried, their hopes and dreams will be buried in the casket with them. That in itself is sad enough but the real tragedy is the children will carry with them forever the weekend that their parents selfishly gobbled up a lethal dose of drugs.

The sad part is that mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, brother and sisters are dying all the time in Huntington. Those sad, tragic losses of love, hopes and dreams are not in the headlines.

So how or where does it all end? Where do we start the fight? It's like the old question which came first the chicken or the egg? Do we start with the supply or demand? Who gets the blame: the Huntington druggies who created the demand or the Detroit drug dealers who supply it.

The answer? Neither and both. Yes, the HPD will continue the admirable though frustrating job they are doing and I really do think they are doing a good job and they will go after both the supply and demand.

But the answer is also neither. We must look within ourselves. The drug user must realize they are hurting the ones they love and those that love them. Loved ones must look inside and realize the power of tough love.

The drug user must save themselves. Friends, families, and professionals can help but the user has to decide.

Drugs are the plague of our time. The real tragedy of drugs is the effect they have on innocent children who have no choice in the matter

Since: Dec 13

Location hidden

#2 Dec 18, 2013
alligator jackson wrote:
Huntington fell farther behind in its' drug war this week. Another week, another shooting death by a Michigan gunman. The 27th Street shooting grabbed the news headlines this week but it was a silent story that was the most gut wrenching.

The real heartbreaking story did not appear on WSAZ. The Herald-Dispatch did not print the saddest bomb dropped in the local drug war.

Last weekend, the bodies of a mother and father were found in The west end of Huntington by the girl's father and their small children. They had overdosed on Heroin.

This story is not an urban myth. I verified the story. I know the names. The bodies are at the examiners office in Charleston. I'm not printing the names out of respect for the families involved but the story needs to be told.

The shootings will always find their way to the front page. The Huntington shootings in the past few years have primarily involved drug dealers and drug users. It is a nasty symptom of a city with a drug problem. So it may sound mean when I say those type of murders will happen and we should be glad that it is not innocent residents being robbed and killed for drug money; but deep inside, we know its true.

Drug users and drug dealers kill each other,that's a fact that we've learned to live with. It is a risk of the lifestyle that we have accepted that comes with the territory. It's kind of like if you want to play, you've got to pay. If you are a drug dealer or user that wants to be a gangster or player, it is part of the risk.

But the children who lost their parents did not accept the risk. They were robbed anyway. They were robbed of being walked to class the first day of school with their parents; they were robbed of Christmas mornings opening presents while their parents snapped pictures; they were robbed of a father to play catch with and a mother to help with homework; they were robbed of a parent to walk them down the aisle or of a grand parent for their children. They were sentenced to a lifetime of not having the people that brought them into the world to hold their hand when they are sick or be proud of them in their accomplishments.

When the parents are buried, their hopes and dreams will be buried in the casket with them. That in itself is sad enough but the real tragedy is the children will carry with them forever the weekend that their parents selfishly gobbled up a lethal dose of drugs.

The sad part is that mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, brother and sisters are dying all the time in Huntington. Those sad, tragic losses of love, hopes and dreams are not in the headlines.

So how or where does it all end? Where do we start the fight? It's like the old question which came first the chicken or the egg? Do we start with the supply or demand? Who gets the blame: the Huntington druggies who created the demand or the Detroit drug dealers who supply it.

The answer? Neither and both. Yes, the HPD will continue the admirable though frustrating job they are doing and I really do think they are doing a good job and they will go after both the supply and demand.

But the answer is also neither. We must look within ourselves. The drug user must realize they are hurting the ones they love and those that love them. Loved ones must look inside and realize the power of tough love.

The drug user must save themselves. Friends, families, and professionals can help but the user has to decide.

Drugs are the plague of our time. The real tragedy of drugs is the effect they have on innocent children who have no choice in the matter
So very true!
True boo

Faber, VA

#3 Dec 18, 2013
Jessica and Dale Harless. R.I.P. How this story didn't make ANY news whatsoever ill never know. But it is a severe tragedy nonetheless. Oh how my heart goes out to those little children. It's so unfair that this poison took there parents. Whoever reads this, please send prayers there way. Please let them eventually overcome this and succeed in there lives.
Cryin shame

Faber, VA

#4 Dec 19, 2013
The drug user must save himself? They can't! That is the problem. The drug takes over and they are a shell of the person they used to be. It is as successful as a cancer patient cutting out his own tumor. I don't know what the answer is. Jail for crimes resulting from opiate addictions is a waste of time. If you were a good person before the addiction takes over, I believe there is a chance at an eventual rehab. But often times, drugs are used to mask a mental illness, some as severe as schizophrenia, some as simple as impulse control. It can vary greatly and that mix of issues, causes a life without drugs to be a goal never realized. Doctors and affiliates got rich prescribing this crap. A guaranteed every three-month visit. Now that the community is addicted, the government shuts the flow of pills and the every day closet addict is forced into the streets for his fix.
alligator jackson

Chicago, IL

#5 Dec 19, 2013
Cryin shame wrote:
The drug user must save himself? They can't! That is the problem. The drug takes over and they are a shell of the person they used to be. It is as successful as a cancer patient cutting out his own tumor. I don't know what the answer is. Jail for crimes resulting from opiate addictions is a waste of time. If you were a good person before the addiction takes over, I believe there is a chance at an eventual rehab. But often times, drugs are used to mask a mental illness, some as severe as schizophrenia, some as simple as impulse control. It can vary greatly and that mix of issues, causes a life without drugs to be a goal never realized. Doctors and affiliates got rich prescribing this crap. A guaranteed every three-month visit. Now that the community is addicted, the government shuts the flow of pills and the every day closet addict is forced into the streets for his fix.
I agree. I guess what I meant is that they have to want to save themselves. I work at a mental hospital and we get people who come in because they can't find anything or someone put them there and they aren't ready to quit. I believe if a person wants to quit they can because I've seen it but they have to take that first step or everyone's effort is a waste of time
Cryin shame

Faber, VA

#6 Dec 20, 2013
I believe sobriety CAN.happen, I just think some people believe that the addict is in control when they aren't. Insert opiate, insert the control box. The addiction to opiates is a whole other ball game. Meth took effort. Opiates were handed to them by a 'doctor' first. Some People who wouldn't take a sip of alcohol, took a prescription. It netted a group of people that may have NEVER taken an illegal substance, but since their doctor gave it to them, they took it. Our city is under siege. People between the ages of 25 and 45 seem to be the group hit the hardest. Which means their children are, as you said, the true victims. The grandparents having to raise another generation after feeling like they didn't do a great job the first time. It's a tragedy and I think in the future, it will be studied as sort of a plague. The Plague of Opiates and Addiction. And just like a plague, no family is TOO good to be affected by it.
Very Sad

Huntington, WV

#7 Dec 20, 2013
I believe and agree with the original poster stating that the drug users must become the focus not the dealers. If we as a society continually bring drug abuses very powerful and negative outcomes publically maybe something will change.. Maybe graphic pictures of finding a dead person will a needle stick stuck in their arm .. That's the sad reality
whata shame

United States

#8 Dec 26, 2013
So sad!!! I hate addiction. Rip to the lost..

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