Rates of mental distress vary widely in Isles, report finds

There are 45 comments on the The Honolulu Advertiser story from Mar 7, 2008, titled Rates of mental distress vary widely in Isles, report finds. In it, The Honolulu Advertiser reports that:

Hawai'i adults have the nation's lowest rate for experiencing "serious psychological distress," but young people here ranked in the highest ranges, according to a new report by the U.S. Department of Health and ...

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Since: Feb 08

wahiawa

#1 Mar 7, 2008
my generation wasn't depressed. we were too busy working or having fun to be depressed. we went to work while still in school so we could have money to have fun with. why would a child living in hawaii be depressed? for $1 a child can ride the bus to anywhere on the island and hang out at the beach. or the mall. or a friends house. as i taught soldiers in the army: suck it up and drive on!
hmmm

United States

#2 Mar 7, 2008
some very depressing statistics
Bailey

Hilo, HI

#3 Mar 7, 2008
"...Young people who see their parents working so hard could also be depressed over their limited options to prosper in the Islands, Grambs added."

Great success for the "system"!

Like they say, "It takes a pillage".

What a system it is.

“4 "Blondie"”

Since: Nov 07

;-) @>--;--

#4 Mar 7, 2008
This is BS!

There has to be an ulterior motive here, and I have a feeling it's to bring about acceptance of phsychological screening and the administering of associated meds in schools.

There is actually a big push across the country for this, and what is odd is that it is coming about when universal health care is being intruduced and pres Shrub signs a seemingly innocent bill to disarm "mentally ill" and, get this, VETRANS that had some sort of "phsychological distress" in the past.

So if this does happen in the schools one could believe that they could simply home school their kids. However, there are occurances happening in other states that already have this in place in public schools that law enforcement are finding ways to (illegally) force parents to put their kids in school.

funny how one of the main subjects in this article emphasizes the rampant occurance of "clinical depression" in Hawai'i's youth, but than goes on to try to back that with everything that is situational.

Careful everyone. It is another one of those "for your safety" things.

“4 "Blondie"”

Since: Nov 07

;-) @>--;--

#5 Mar 7, 2008
There has to be an ulterior motive here, and I have a feeling it's to bring about acceptance of phsychological screening and the administering of associated meds in schools.

There is actually a big push across the country for this, and what is odd is that it is coming about when universal health care is being intruduced and pres Shrub signs a seemingly innocent bill to disarm "mentally ill" and, get this, VETRANS that had some sort of "phsychological distress" in the past.

So if this does happen in the schools one could believe that they could simply home school their kids. However, there are occurances happening in other states that already have this in place in public schools that law enforcement are finding ways to (illegally) force parents to put their kids in school.

funny how one of the main subjects in this article emphasizes the rampant occurance of "clinical depression" in Hawai'i's youth, but than goes on to try to back that with everything that is situational.

Careful everyone. It is another one of those "for your safety" things.

“in all things be pono, aloha”

Since: Aug 07

moloka'I, hawaii

#6 Mar 7, 2008
could this ulterior motive result in more prescriptions for dont-give-a-damn-pills so the drug companies make even more money? with anything be assured that MONEY is the motive.

“4 "Blondie"”

Since: Nov 07

;-) @>--;--

#7 Mar 7, 2008
halemalu wrote:
could this ulterior motive result in more prescriptions for dont-give-a-damn-pills so the drug companies make even more money? with anything be assured that MONEY is the motive.
Naturally.

Our gubbeerrment is the biggest investor in the pharm industry.

There is even a bill being circulated that would prohibit pharm companies from being sued at all, for any reason.

There is even a bill being circulated that would grant all control of supplements and natural "remedies" to the pharm companies, just like in the European Union.

I'd provide links to the bills but they do not read that litterally. As alway, they are attached to the main things being presented without being obvious. Heck, they know most are not lawyers that can understand the jargon.

“Live Aloha”

Since: Oct 07

Kaneohe

#9 Mar 7, 2008
Aloha,

This is an ongoing problem that I experienced first hand 30 years ago growing up in Hawai'i.

Since that time, I've made it a point to educate myself in such a manner learning about everything I could get my hands on in preparation for return in 3 years to help our Hawai'i Youth.

This is not a ploy to gain carte blanche authorization to administer drugs, at the same time, those agencies that are accountable can't hide behind a veil no longer and down play a Horrid fact of Life!

There are so many contributing factors and one big disadvantage is the fact that there is minimal communtiy participation, out dated infrastructure and lack of vision by our Legislators.

Our kids need outlets and places of Refuge.

Hawaiian's knew of these special places and created the Pu'uhonua.

We need modern day Pu'uhonu for our younger citizens and a staff whom have been there and done that vice educated staff whom lack hands on experience. Text book smarts only goes so far before one reaches a Road Block to big to conquer.

Hoping that our Government Leaders will wake up and assign this inconsistency to the Highest Priority before the matter escalates to a point of no return.

With Aloha,

Moke Young

“in all things be pono, aloha”

Since: Aug 07

moloka'I, hawaii

#10 Mar 7, 2008
Jackass wrote:
just have everyone smoke a little weed once in awhile, that will take away any depression episodes.
hahaha! that is the first thing that came to mind..
life is sooo wonderful here in hawaii. depression is the last thing one would think. i can see however how depression can be a result of never having enough money to get by.

“4 "Blondie"”

Since: Nov 07

;-) @>--;--

#11 Mar 7, 2008
Moke wrote:
Aloha,
This is an ongoing problem that I experienced first hand 30 years ago growing up in Hawai'i.
Since that time, I've made it a point to educate myself in such a manner learning about everything I could get my hands on in preparation for return in 3 years to help our Hawai'i Youth.
This is not a ploy to gain carte blanche authorization to administer drugs, at the same time, those agencies that are accountable can't hide behind a veil no longer and down play a Horrid fact of Life!
There are so many contributing factors and one big disadvantage is the fact that there is minimal communtiy participation, out dated infrastructure and lack of vision by our Legislators.
Our kids need outlets and places of Refuge.
Hawaiian's knew of these special places and created the Pu'uhonua.
We need modern day Pu'uhonu for our younger citizens and a staff whom have been there and done that vice educated staff whom lack hands on experience. Text book smarts only goes so far before one reaches a Road Block to big to conquer.
Hoping that our Government Leaders will wake up and assign this inconsistency to the Highest Priority before the matter escalates to a point of no return.
With Aloha,
Moke Young
I'd love to believe that what will result from this would be places like Pu'uhonu, and I do believe that this sort of thing is needed.

And, I admire your outreach in your personal life.

But, we are talking about western constructs/categorizations-whi ch is totally apparent in this article. Nowhere does it elude to safe havens.

We must look to occurances on the mainland because this state is being modeled more and more like it. If we were to ignore this it would be another nail in the coffin of our youth.

“4 "Blondie"”

Since: Nov 07

;-) @>--;--

#12 Mar 7, 2008
Moke,
I do not want to see other families go thru the same thing my parents and I did.

If I divulged to you my bio, you'd be horrified.

There is a sick, twisted side to all of it. Take it from someone who has been litterally victimized by the system and rebounded ON THEIR OWN.

“Live Aloha”

Since: Oct 07

Kaneohe

#13 Mar 7, 2008
Hllslander,

Mahalo for your input!

With Aloha,

Moke
Deb Mines

Honolulu, HI

#14 Mar 7, 2008
Interesting reading. Apparently the depression over limited options to prosper in the islands and families working 2 jobs is more widespread than just the youth. The high cost of living affects us all, all ages, all income levels.

“Eschew Obfuscation”

Since: Dec 07

Ewa Beach, HI

#15 Mar 7, 2008
Stigma likely remains the greatest barrier. Yeah, we have good weather, but a culture that inhibits sharing problems and talking about oneself, generally speaking. I'd bet that most of it is of a neurotic origin than anything biological. And it is a fact that rates of diagnosis here are at least 100% less than on the mainland.

The healthcare system is actually quite ahead of the curve for once since we have mandated behavioral health coverage in this state and near full parity. There are very few barriers to care, with the exception of a dearth of child psychiatrists thanks to the Felix Decree. Psychologists abound, though.
Naomi Shigenaga

Honolulu, HI

#17 Mar 7, 2008
I am a 42 yr-old sansei (3rd generation Japanese-American) female & I’ve seen therapists off & on since I was 10 yrs-old due to depression, including suicidal thoughts. Mental Illness is also a Physical illness – the brain IS a physical part of the body. With “Clinical” depression, a person is physically unable to produce an adequate amount of neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine, & dopamine) the way a Type II Diabetic is physically unable to produce enough insulin. And like a diabetic, situational events can impact whether or not the condition develops into an illness requiring medication and life style changes.

For example, if a diabetic is producing an almost normal amount of insulin & eats a balanced diet & exercises regularly, they may not need meds & life changes. If instead, they eat a lot of carbs & are overweight, diabetic symptoms may start to appear.

But if they are only able to produce a low amount of insulin, even if they maintain a healthy lifestyle, they will need medication & constant monitoring.

With Clinical Depression, the person is born with the potential to become depressed. If their life is dysfunctional and they do not learn healthy coping skills, depression is likely to occur, depending also on the level of neurotransmitters they are biologically able to produce.

Anti-depressants may help to bring the neurotransmitter levels back up to a Normal level. They are NOT instant “happy pills”. However, neurotransmitters are only part of the Physical problem and scientists are still looking for more answers. Also not all people respond to the anti-depressants currently available on the market.

My personal experience with anti-depressant meds has been:
Prozac & Zoloft – they each gave me migraines, so I stopped after a week.
Serzone – no effect after 3 months.
Paxil was the first anti-dep. that lifted my depression, but after 6 weeks, I built up a tolerance to it, & kept doing so after each dosage increase and switch
Effexor & Celexa – used them for about a year each & had to switch off due to my body building up tolerances to them.
Alternative supplements & treatments – some are too expensive to use regularly; or my lack of neurotransmitters is too severe for them to make a significant impact.

Currently I am on Lexapro & Wellbutrin as well as other meds (Cytomel, Seroquel, Aviane, & Provigil) to help keep my head above water, so I can function, although not up to the level I once did – working full-time while pursuing my Master’s, volunteering for Hawaii Literacy, playing bon dance music, & being in a hula halau; as well as being the person relied upon to help plan baby showers, birthday parties, etc.

I also see my psychologist once a week for talk-therapy and try to live a life that is healthy mentally, physically, & spiritually, but it’s not easy & many times I feel like I’m barely keeping my nose above water, & sometimes the thought of giving up & just sinking underwater plagues my mind.

I hope this comment helps people better understand mental illness & gets rid of its stigma.

“in all things be pono, aloha”

Since: Aug 07

moloka'I, hawaii

#18 Mar 7, 2008
so it's an imbalance of brain chemicals that can be corrected by supplying these with meds. got it. thanks. but why is it so common, or has it always been common but not recognized until recently? is this related to diet, i.e. fastfoods, processed foods, additives?
i remember my mother in germany being badly affected by the war and the death of my father, and she was either up or down with moods. this was hard on us kids. looking back now i realize it could have been an illness like bi-polar. sister has not forgiven mom, but i was able to because i realize what it was.
alice

Honolulu, HI

#19 Mar 7, 2008
True..but to be frank, Americans have every right to be depressed when they consider what has happened to this once proud country under Bush.

“in all things be pono, aloha”

Since: Aug 07

moloka'I, hawaii

#20 Mar 7, 2008
i feel sorry for president bush. he isn't God, he is just a man, but people expect leaders to be a god. who would want that job anyway, just being a whippingboy who is blamed for what goes on in the world. the enemy is real, not imagined. i am a pacifist and don't understand conflict, but that is my religion. i think if we get out of the middle east we will be in trouble, and if we don't pull the troops we will be in trouble. like another thread here talking about depression, those poor troops must be suffering at the sights they see every day and the knowledge that most people here want them to pull out.
i really think there is no malicious intent on the part of our leadership. but mistakes are being made. God bless America
(and i am not even a citizen quite yet).

Since: Feb 08

wahiawa

#21 Mar 7, 2008
having never experienced depression that was not brought on by something i did that did not work out well, i cannot sympathize with those who go thru bouts of depression or anxiety without any discernable cause. seems to me that if you know what causes your depression and understand that it can be controlled by drugs, then i would also understand that it can be controlled by my mind. if i get depressed, i know it is the chemical imbalance and not something i did. so i know that the depression is not real or relevant, it is in the mind. if it is in the mind, i can put it out of my mind. fight my way thru it and continue the mission: enjoying life.
alice

Honolulu, HI

#22 Mar 7, 2008
Yes, one third of the military who have had 3 or more deployments are suffering from depression. I have met a few of them and they despise Bush, his lies, what they did in oraq, and their diminshed lives. I believe Bush knew exactly what he was doing and we has greatly weakened our country. Wait until all of you are on the street begging for food when the economy totally collapses in a year or so.

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