Crime in Hawaii: Safest Cities?
310 Warrior Mom

Redondo Beach, CA

#123 Jan 20, 2008
NY Islander wrote:
"Haole go home!" LOL!!! Sorry folks, but I'm reminded of my two most memorable "haole go home!" moments while attending UH-Manoa in the late 70s - early 80s.
The first happened when a friend asked me to pick up a JBL magnum speargun he had put in a surf/dive shop near Waikiki to have the rubbers replaced. As I was walking down Kapahulu Ave with the speargun wrapped in plastic sheeting, a light pick-up with two occupants swerved toward me and right up on the sidewalk trying to give me a little scare. I ran to the side and wasn't hurt. As they drove away, the passenger yelled out, in highly Filipino-accented English, "Haole go home!" and I heard them both laughing. Whoops, too bad for them the next traffic light was red with several cars stopped ahead of them. I tore the wrapper off the spear gun, cocked the rubbers, and ran up to the passenger window of their truck. I put the tip of the loaded spear up against the passenger's forehead and said something like, "So how would you like a one-way ticket to lumpia heaven, m-----f-----?" I swear, that Filipino's eyes seemed to recede far into the back of his skull. He put his hands in the air and started blabbering, "I'm sorry, sir... I'm sorry, sir..." The startled driver was revving the engine, tooting the horn and screaming, "Go! go! go!" at the driver's in front of him. No, I didn't pull the trigger. I let them drive off. But I'll bet those two pinoys later thought twice before telling any more haoles to go home.
The second incident happened a couple of years later as I was walking down King St after classes to pick up my daughter at a little pre-school run by the Hongwanji Buddhist Mission (I don't think the school is there anymore). Just as I got to the gate of the pre-school, three young mokes (couldn't tell if they were Hawaiian or Samoan) got off TheBus and started in with the "Haole go home!" stuff. Instead of meekly backing down, as all good haoles in Hawaii are expected to do, I stood right up to them and started giving them some New York-style lip of my own. Soon, they had me encircled and were getting ready for the typical (island-style) three-on-one beatdown, when the supervisor of the pre-school, a fiesty, Japanese sansei girl with the vocabulary of a sailor but a heart of gold, saw what was going on and came to the gate. The looks on those punks' faces when she started in on them was priceless! She let them have it! The previous tough guys meekly wandered off, saying nothing. LOL!!!
Finally, in fairness, these types of incidents were rare in my time in Hawaii. The majority of local folks there are decent, law-abiding, and don't go around telling haoles to go home.
DID WE GO TO UH WITH YOU!

HYSTERICAL!
alice

Honolulu, HI

#124 Jan 20, 2008
depressing story really
NY Islander

New York, NY

#125 Jan 20, 2008
310 Warrior Mom wrote:
<quoted text>
DID WE GO TO UH WITH YOU!
HYSTERICAL!
Maybe. UH-Manoa, Class of '82.

Fortunately, like fine wine, I've mellowed with age since my scrappy, fresh-from-the-Army, college days. I certainly don't condone putting a gun of any kind to somebody's head as a result of a simple racial slur.
310 Warrior Mom

Kaneohe, HI

#126 Jan 20, 2008
NY Islander wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe. UH-Manoa, Class of '82.
Fortunately, like fine wine, I've mellowed with age since my scrappy, fresh-from-the-Army, college days. I certainly don't condone putting a gun of any kind to somebody's head as a result of a simple racial slur.
GOT THE MASTERS UH 81...DO YOU REMEMBER TIGHT END DAVID BARBOUR? HE MARRIED MY BEST FRIEND...
Lucky We Live Hawaii

Maunaloa, HI

#127 Jan 20, 2008
So sad that our local people (whom are mostly of mixed races) forget the meaning of 'Haole.' It means foreigner...haha! And most of them have bloodlines in them that would classify themselves as Hoale! Small mindedness!
GINGER-GIRL

Waipahu, HI

#128 Jan 20, 2008
NY Islander wrote:
"Haole go home!" LOL!!! Sorry folks, but I'm reminded of my two most memorable "haole go home!" moments while attending UH-Manoa in the late 70s - early 80s.
The first happened when a friend asked me to pick up a JBL magnum speargun he had put in a surf/dive shop near Waikiki to have the rubbers replaced. As I was walking down Kapahulu Ave with the speargun wrapped in plastic sheeting, a light pick-up with two occupants swerved toward me and right up on the sidewalk trying to give me a little scare. I ran to the side and wasn't hurt. As they drove away, the passenger yelled out, in highly Filipino-accented English, "Haole go home!" and I heard them both laughing. Whoops, too bad for them the next traffic light was red with several cars stopped ahead of them. I tore the wrapper off the spear gun, cocked the rubbers, and ran up to the passenger window of their truck. I put the tip of the loaded spear up against the passenger's forehead and said something like, "So how would you like a one-way ticket to lumpia heaven, m-----f-----?" I swear, that Filipino's eyes seemed to recede far into the back of his skull. He put his hands in the air and started blabbering, "I'm sorry, sir... I'm sorry, sir..." The startled driver was revving the engine, tooting the horn and screaming, "Go! go! go!" at the driver's in front of him. No, I didn't pull the trigger. I let them drive off. But I'll bet those two pinoys later thought twice before telling any more haoles to go home.
The second incident happened a couple of years later as I was walking down King St after classes to pick up my daughter at a little pre-school run by the Hongwanji Buddhist Mission (I don't think the school is there anymore). Just as I got to the gate of the pre-school, three young mokes (couldn't tell if they were Hawaiian or Samoan) got off TheBus and started in with the "Haole go home!" stuff. Instead of meekly backing down, as all good haoles in Hawaii are expected to do, I stood right up to them and started giving them some New York-style lip of my own. Soon, they had me encircled and were getting ready for the typical (island-style) three-on-one beatdown, when the supervisor of the pre-school, a fiesty, Japanese sansei girl with the vocabulary of a sailor but a heart of gold, saw what was going on and came to the gate. The looks on those punks' faces when she started in on them was priceless! She let them have it! The previous tough guys meekly wandered off, saying nothing. LOL!!!
Finally, in fairness, these types of incidents were rare in my time in Hawaii. The majority of local folks there are decent, law-abiding, and don't go around telling haoles to go home.
It is a real "treat" to have so many young filipino men around. I have never seen so many YOUNG people embrace a culture that is trashy and ghetto. I was told when I post on locals it is actually more about filipino culture that I don't agree with. Well I know many good filipino families but most of the teenage boys I could do without. Call me racist if you want but I moved to Hawaii and not Manila.
jennifer in waianae

Kailua, HI

#129 Jan 20, 2008
Aloha717200 wrote:
Aloha,
Trying to do some research on crime rates throughout the islands and in most cases I can't find any specific data on individual cities, instead I am finding crime rate data for whole counties.
But some cities are safer than others, so I'd like to ask the kama'aina here for their views.
On each island, what cities or areas would you consider unsafe? What parts of the islands seem to have higher rates of theft, violence, drugs, etc?
Where are the areas you'd consider raising a family in? My wife and I would like to raise our children in a safe neighborhood, and we're also trying to find what public schools might be better than others, but my main concern is to not move us into an area where we'd be at a high risk of crime.
What do you think? I'm looking for views from all islands, as we haven't decided 100% what island we plan to move to, though we are leaning towards Maui.
It looks like we'd be renting an apartment for the first few years of being in the islands, until we can afford or build enough credit to move into an actual home. We are also haole, but love and respect the culture, history, people, and environment of Hawaii. Still, would us being haole put us at increased risk in some areas? I've read about some getting attacked, but I also believe that some people bring things on themselves if they lack aloha spirit. What do you think?
Mahalo in advance for your help,
Brandon and Katie
That is the problem here, large areas fall under one city or county. I live 40 minutes away from Honolulu but my police are Honolulu police, my community board falls under Honolulu umbrella and our elected officials (except community board members) cover all of Oahu. My community is dumped on because they spread statistic throughout the whole island. So if my community is having several crimes and we request more police, we are told they only keep track of petty crimes here, felonies fall under the Honolulu district. It is spread out thinly over the island so it doesn't seem as dangerous. So, what happens is the mayor and many other officials are living in Honolulu but making decisions that effect a community that they don't live in. I live in Waianae, which isn't always an area people want to live in, but it is affordable, the people are nice (despite what rumors are out there) and we as a community are fighting to get our community back in order. It has a small town feel here and that is why it has a bad rap, people here are originally from here and they don't want people coming in and making it unaffordable for the locals. Hawaii is just like anywhere else, you have your good neighborhoods and your bad. If you move here, I suggest reading the neighborhood board minutes online in the neighborhood you choose before making a decision. That way you know what you are getting into. Hawaii is beautiful and the culture is one of aloha.
310 Warrior Mom

Kaneohe, HI

#130 Jan 20, 2008
JUST GET A TASER!
NY Islander

New York, NY

#131 Jan 20, 2008
310 Warrior Mom wrote:
<quoted text>
GOT THE MASTERS UH 81...DO YOU REMEMBER TIGHT END DAVID BARBOUR? HE MARRIED MY BEST FRIEND...
I remember him, now that you mention his name. The three UH football players I knew personally from those days were Jesse Sapolu, Tom Tuinei and Buzz Preston.
310 Warrior Mom

Redondo Beach, CA

#132 Jan 20, 2008
NY Islander wrote:
<quoted text>
I remember him, now that you mention his name. The three UH football players I knew personally from those days were Jesse Sapolu, Tom Tuinei and Buzz Preston.
THE GOOD OLE BOYYYYYZZZZZZZZZZ
NoMoYuppieTransp lants

United States

#133 Jan 20, 2008
Aloha717200 wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm no yuppie, quite the opposite, I'm low income. Sounds like you have a lot of anger towards transplants. I can understand that, but rest assured I'm not in the same category as the people you seem to be so angry at. I've taken the costs into consideration as well, I'm figuring on having to work two jobs to make ends meet.
You're definitely passionate, may I ask why my thread is bothering you so much?
Yeah, right...SURE you're "low income". Low income people don't worry about buying sports cars and alarm systems.
I can tell you what REAL low income people worry about: HOW we're going to pay the bills and feed our family members and not either go into foreclosure or get evicted. We worry about IF we'll still have our jobs next month. We worry IF we're ever going to be able to someday plan on having ONE kid. If we do, how are we ever going to spend time with them with BOTH parents working multiple jobs? You think Grandma can watch them? She's over 70 and working 12 hour days herself!
"Low income" and you're doing research on moving your family to Hawaii? ROTFLMAO. Believable, no reeeeeeeeeeeally.
GINGER-GIRL

Waipahu, HI

#134 Jan 20, 2008
We need to give away Suze Orman books to high school students. A huge part of the problem here and everywhere else on the planet is people do not know anything about money and how to use it. Many people here would not have to work two jobs if they were educated early on about money and how to put it to work. When I first arrived here and worked at an office many of the women there would complain how they could barely make ends meet. Yet, these same women ate "plate lunch" sometimes two times a day. Many had nice cars and spent well beyond what they could actually afford. It is not their fault really, as we just dont teach young people about money in school. Ever heard of the "Latte Factor"? Wonderful book if you want to start looking a money differently.

Since: Jan 08

Pocatello, ID

#135 Jan 20, 2008
NoMoYuppieTransplants wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, right...SURE you're "low income". Low income people don't worry about buying sports cars and alarm systems.
I can tell you what REAL low income people worry about: HOW we're going to pay the bills and feed our family members and not either go into foreclosure or get evicted. We worry about IF we'll still have our jobs next month. We worry IF we're ever going to be able to someday plan on having ONE kid. If we do, how are we ever going to spend time with them with BOTH parents working multiple jobs? You think Grandma can watch them? She's over 70 and working 12 hour days herself!
"Low income" and you're doing research on moving your family to Hawaii? ROTFLMAO. Believable, no reeeeeeeeeeeally.
Sounds like you're pretty convinced of your view of me. It's incorrect, but if you want to feel that way, that's your deal. We are low income. But planning ahead is always a wise move. My car came with the microchip installed, I never paid a million bucks to have it installed. A home alarm is something I'd be looking into years down the road when I would actually have the income to own my own house, if ever.

85% of my income goes towards bills. The rest goes towards other things that arise, and if I'm lucky, maybe once every two weeks I can spend $20 on my wife or myself for something extra. I have had $10 to my name for two weeks which I am saving just in case I need gas before my next paycheck. You do not know me personally, yet you seem to be accusing me of being a liar. I have only spoken to you politely. You respond with sneers. That's okay, you don't want to see any other side except your own. Fair enough. I'll just consider our discussion ended since there's no point in going in circles.

I think reasonable people in this thread and others will understand that you don't have to be rich to plan for the future, to aspire to achivieving your dreams, and to save up for a brighter future. Even a poor man can save money if he's willing to make sacrifices.

Since: Jan 08

Pocatello, ID

#136 Jan 20, 2008
Marauder wrote:
Love the speargun story! Reminds me of a time when I was in DC and a guy accosted us demanding money. He didn't get anything and was last seen running toward Ford Theater.
Some transplants are fearful of new transplants. You can see a lot of that on the forums. Brandon, you sound like someone who I'd like to have as a neighbor.
Thank you once again for the kind words, Marauder. I feel the same. If we're both still on the board by the time I take a trip to Maui maybe we could meet somewhere for a chat. I'll introduce you to the Mrs.:D
Seariders

Honolulu, HI

#137 Jan 21, 2008
Aloha717200 wrote:
Aloha,
Trying to do some research on crime rates throughout the islands and in most cases I can't find any specific data on individual cities, instead I am finding crime rate data for whole counties.
But some cities are safer than others, so I'd like to ask the kama'aina here for their views.
On each island, what cities or areas would you consider unsafe? What parts of the islands seem to have higher rates of theft, violence, drugs, etc?
Where are the areas you'd consider raising a family in? My wife and I would like to raise our children in a safe neighborhood, and we're also trying to find what public schools might be better than others, but my main concern is to not move us into an area where we'd be at a high risk of crime.
What do you think? I'm looking for views from all islands, as we haven't decided 100% what island we plan to move to, though we are leaning towards Maui.
It looks like we'd be renting an apartment for the first few years of being in the islands, until we can afford or build enough credit to move into an actual home. We are also haole, but love and respect the culture, history, people, and environment of Hawaii. Still, would us being haole put us at increased risk in some areas? I've read about some getting attacked, but I also believe that some people bring things on themselves if they lack aloha spirit. What do you think?
Mahalo in advance for your help,
Brandon and Katie
Chinatown on Oahu would probably rank at the top of the list. If you count all of the drug dealers, pimps, illegal gamblers, hookers and the homeless that engage in support of such illegal activity I doubt there is any area in the State that has so many scofflaws. Some of the posts have called Chinatown a Red Light District.
Seariders

Honolulu, HI

#138 Jan 21, 2008
jennifer in waianae wrote:
<quoted text>That is the problem here, large areas fall under one city or county. I live 40 minutes away from Honolulu but my police are Honolulu police, my community board falls under Honolulu umbrella and our elected officials (except community board members) cover all of Oahu. My community is dumped on because they spread statistic throughout the whole island. So if my community is having several crimes and we request more police, we are told they only keep track of petty crimes here, felonies fall under the Honolulu district. It is spread out thinly over the island so it doesn't seem as dangerous. So, what happens is the mayor and many other officials are living in Honolulu but making decisions that effect a community that they don't live in. I live in Waianae, which isn't always an area people want to live in, but it is affordable, the people are nice (despite what rumors are out there) and we as a community are fighting to get our community back in order. It has a small town feel here and that is why it has a bad rap, people here are originally from here and they don't want people coming in and making it unaffordable for the locals. Hawaii is just like anywhere else, you have your good neighborhoods and your bad. If you move here, I suggest reading the neighborhood board minutes online in the neighborhood you choose before making a decision. That way you know what you are getting into. Hawaii is beautiful and the culture is one of aloha.
Waianae has had a bad reputation yet all the years I live there I never have one negative experience of being a victim of crime. Everyone seem to know each other like ohana. Of couse if you act like your all that and call out the local boys for a fight, they will not back down. If you treat them with respect they respect you back. Of course like anyplace you could be in the wrong place at the wrong time and get into hot water. But like I mention before that Chinatown is much worse. That is where the gangstas from Kalihi hang out at night. Peace out.
Seariders

Honolulu, HI

#139 Jan 21, 2008
Sometimes Happy Citizen wrote:
On Oahu, anywhere there is 'housing' is a bad area. Not only the housing itself, but the surrounding area as the low lifes lurk around.
Just off the top of my head... stay away from the areas of...
Palolo Housing
Kuhio Park Terrace
Halawa Housing
The 'Pupu' streets in Waipahu
Kam IV Housing
A lot of auto thefts everywhere... not driving a Honda/Acura will decrease your probability of being a victim of auto theft. Also a lot of car break ins everywhere. Burglaries seem to be a dime a dozen in the Pearl City area.
Law enforcement is doing their job by making arrests, but its the weak judicial system that's kicking out the low lifes on probation because the prisons are full (no one wants a new prison in their back yard, and no one wants to fork over the money to ship prisoners to the mainland) and no one was hurt (property crimes).
You know how messed up things are? I'll give one example. Lately, we've had a run of bank robberies. Remember in years past, banks used exploding dye packs placed with the loot? Hmmmm, notice you don't ever see those anymore.... why? Because someone robbed a bank and placed the loot in his pocket. The pack exploded and injured the robber. The robber sued and the bank paid a settlement... so banks, not wanting the liability just let the robbers go with the loot! How stupid is that!!!!!!
HINT, HINT, ROB BANKS, THEY DON'T PUT DYE PACKS ANYMORE... AND IF THEY DO, PUT THE LOOT IN YOUR PANTS SO YOU CAN SUE!
Sorry, I'm not trying to discourage you from moving here. Its a nice place along with the people, but I'm just sick of judicial system and legislators here. I've been victimized many times and the police are great... but after they make their case, its in the hands of the weak prosecutors office.
Chinatown would top the list and win hands down as the most notorious place in the State. The gangbangers from KPT and Mayor Wright Housing hang out and moonlight as drug dealers in two halves of the Chinatown District. Not to mention all the organized crime elements that support prostitution, illegal gambling and drugs. Try topping that anyone!
NY Islander

New York, NY

#140 Jan 21, 2008
Is Kuhio Park Terrace (KPT) still there? Dang! I thought they would have taken the wrecking ball to that dump a long time ago! Way back in my Hawaii days - late 70s, early 80s - it was unsafe for human habitation. Multi-families crowded into small, run-down apartment units; elevators that rarely worked; toilets constantly plugged causing residents to urinate/defecate in the hall and stairways. And then there was the ever-present stench of rotting garbage strewn all over the grounds. With the trash chutes usually jammed, residents simply tossed their trash off the upper-floor lanais.

Heck, even here in my town where slumlords are a dime-a-dozen, a KPT would not be tolerated.
Kimo

Honolulu, HI

#141 Jan 21, 2008
NY Islander wrote:
Is Kuhio Park Terrace (KPT) still there? Dang! I thought they would have taken the wrecking ball to that dump a long time ago! Way back in my Hawaii days - late 70s, early 80s - it was unsafe for human habitation. Multi-families crowded into small, run-down apartment units; elevators that rarely worked; toilets constantly plugged causing residents to urinate/defecate in the hall and stairways. And then there was the ever-present stench of rotting garbage strewn all over the grounds. With the trash chutes usually jammed, residents simply tossed their trash off the upper-floor lanais.
Heck, even here in my town where slumlords are a dime-a-dozen, a KPT would not be tolerated.
Many of the drug dealers in Chinatown come from KPT.
Marauder

United States

#142 Jan 21, 2008
Aloha717200 wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank you once again for the kind words, Marauder. I feel the same. If we're both still on the board by the time I take a trip to Maui maybe we could meet somewhere for a chat. I'll introduce you to the Mrs.:D
Your profile shows that you live in Pocatello, is that where you live?

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