do research on wet counties

Posted in the Hindman Forum

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
progress

Hindman, KY

#1 Apr 16, 2012
Reasons to Repeal Prohibition

More people are becoming very vocal and want the local economy to thrive. Message boards and public forums are sounding boards for those who couldn't speak their mind. They feel heard and local politicians are starting to listen. The young and many older citizens feel this is outdated thinking and behind the times. Many high schoolers go away to college and get to see what life is like with alcohol. Many succumb and over indulge because it's new to them and had to try it.

People can't live in vacuums and live sheltered lives before the Internet, cell phones and television. They see what goes on in the rest of the world and want to be part of it. Once life in small, isolated towns could be controlled but not in today's world.

I like what one small town did in Texas and wonder if it can be done elsewhere.

Mt. Pleasant, Texas has figured out how to serve alcohol in their dry area. The local restaurants with bars designated themselves as a "club" and only serve "members" and anyone can become a member. What a great idea this is!

Episode 3 - A Nation ofHypocrites [HD]

Amazon Price:$6.99


Alcohol Prohibition is a failure

The prohibition of alcohol is a failure.People living in dry counties still can buy it from surrounding counties.

The fact that I grew up with alcohol all around and saw the good and bad effects of it has enabled me to make up my own mind about it. Since we live in a democracy and believe in the Constitution and Bill of Rights, I can't understand why these very same flag wavers would want to deny other people's freedom of choice. Let people think and decide for themselves.

Some may argue that it's about keeping the bootleggers who pay off the politicians to keep the wet-dry referendum off the ballots.

The town of Burnside, Kentucky has had good results by going "moist" in 2005. It's not a boom town by any stretch of the imagination but it is doing a lot better than before. Restaurants have been built and now chain restaurants and other businesses want to build there

The next step is to sell package liquor and beer. We already have two wineries in the far outer sections of the county!

I guess that is progress to a degree. I'd rather have people buying their liquor and beer to take home and drink but Rome wasn't built in a day.

Update

Since writing this hub in 2010,Kentucky has passed the sale of alcohol or "package sales' in several more towns and counties. I see more states in the news passing the sale of alcohol for economic reasons so maybe the term "Prohibition" will be obsolete one day.
progress

Hindman, KY

#2 Apr 16, 2012
The facts are:
◦ According to Kentucky ABC, far more DUI tickets are issued in dry counties than wet.
◦ According to Kentucky ABC, more traffic accidents involving alcohol consumption occur in dry counties than wet.
◦ Wet counties bordering dry counties continue to prosper from dry citizens crossing county lines to purchase alcohol.
◦ Prohibition laws are ignored. Why have laws which are not enforced?

We need to repeal Prohibition - an old, outdated, completely unsuccessful law - and bring in alcohol sales to revitalize our county and our community. By changing this law, we can bring in new business and increase tourism spending now.

"Dry" County Traffic Crashes
by David J. Hanson, Ph.D.

A study of about 39,000 alcohol-related traffic accidents in wet compared to dry (prohibition) counties in Kentucky found that a higher proportion of dry counties' residents are involved in such crashes.

The analysis suggests that residents of dry counties have to drive farther from their homes to consume alcohol, thus increasing impaired driving exposure.

These results are consistent with research conducted by others.

Tax Revenue Up but not Alcohol-Related Problems
The city of Jackson in Alabama recently voted to become “wet.” A lawsuit has been filed in an effort to overturn the results of that election, although early evidence is that only good has resulted from permitting legal sales of alcoholic beverages in the city.

In the first seven months after legalizing alcohol, tax revenues from its sale have been nearly $200,000. Much of that money has gone to benefit programs within the community including a van for the nutrition center and a new building at the high school stadium. It’s anticipated that higher revenues in the summer months will bring the annual revenues to at least $500,000.

In spite of predictions that legal sales would lead to more DUIs and other alcohol-related arrests and problems, the Police Department has found that no evidence in support of those predictions. In fact, arrests for DUI actually dropped, compared to the same period before legalizing alcohol.

This is not surprising. Systematic research has found DUI/DWI to be higher in dry than in wet counties. This may be because people must drive longer distances to obtain alcohol and are on the roads longer. People in Jackson are now presumably buying their beverages locally (increasing tax revenues) and are less likely to drive while impaired.

Reference:
Carden, Evan. Alcohol income up while related problems said minimal. The South Alabamian, February 23, 2006.

Consideration of driver home county prohibition and alcohol-related vehicle crashes.
progress

Hindman, KY

#3 Apr 16, 2012
ECONOMIC IMPACT

A recent newspaper article reported that 97% of the United States allows the legal sale of alcohol in their communities. So your county is unique. It is one of just a few remaining "dry" communities. But, the truth of the matter is, this is not necessarily a great selling point.

People expect to be able to have the option to have a drink with their meal. Especially tourists. Hank Phillips, executive director of the National Tours Association stated that the availability of alcohol makes a difference when tour operators start looking for places to hold meetings and take tourists. If a community wants tourists or meetings and the hotels, restaurants and other things to accommodate them, alcohol is an issue.

Recently a developer called and requested a map of every "dry" county in West Kentucky.
Why? Because they were looking for a location to build an 8 to 12 screen movie house with stadium seating and they were only interested in those communities that were "wet". All dry counties were going to be checked off their list.

Not that they wanted to sell alcohol in their theaters. They were looking for a location where people tended to come to for a nice meal who might be interested in taking in a show afterwards. A dry county did not have this draw.
The theaters ended up being built in Bowling Green and Madisonville, two "wet" communities.

This is not uncommon. Numerous people have stopped in Elizabethtown, Glasgow, and other dry communities. Upon finding out that they could not get a "drink", have chosen to stay elsewhere.

This is even an issue with industrial development. It is a quality of life issue.
progress

Hindman, KY

#4 Apr 16, 2012
Kuttawa (who passed local option in the Fall of 2000) actually had to build a restaurant in order to offer liquor by the drink. A Santa Fe restaurant opened in the Fall of 2001. This small community just announced that they will be getting a $2 million dollar plant which will bring 100 new jobs to the community! This Michigan-based plant had considered Clarksville, TN. and other locations. And yet they chose Kuttawa, Kentucky!

One of the officials with this new industry informed residents that the Santa Fe Restaurant definitely played a part in their selection of Kuttawa. Kuttawa would never have been included on the list of possible locations if the community had been dry. His reasoning was that when they have clients in town, they want to be able take them to a nice restaurant where they have a choice to drink or not. It is a quality of life issue and a certain expectation people have when they come to an area. See Press Release May 17, 2002
progress

Hindman, KY

#5 Apr 16, 2012
This firm now has other companies contacting them expressing interest in moving to Kuttawa. This is a town with a population of 535 people! It doesn't even have a bank nor a grocery store! They will soon! Just watch and see!

Prestonsburg, Ashland, Madisonville, and Morehead all have voted to allow the sale of alcohol within the last ten to twenty years. They were our most recent communities to "go wet" up until the Fall of 2000.

The Alcohol Beverage Control Officers (Known as ABC officers) in each of these communities have reported a decrease in DUI's and public intoxication. Bootleggers have either been forced out of business or have legitimized what they do by opening liquor stores.
progress

Hindman, KY

#6 Apr 16, 2012
Bottom line…Monitoring and controlling the situation is much easier when laws are in place. Reverend Whitt, who has spoken out strongly against the sale of alcohol agrees. There is not a single "dry county" within Kentucky. Just some are more "Moist" than others.

None of the communities regret voting in liquor sales. In fact, due to allowing the sale of liquor, their communities have seen significant growth in the number of restaurants, hotels and businesses in their communities.

For example, since the law was passed in Madisonville in 1992, ten new restaurants have opened, five of which sell alcohol. Stores have reopened, new businesses have come to the area including nine manufacturing plants which will employ over 1800 people within the next few years. It is now a thriving community with a tremendous amount of activities. "Madisonville Mayor Karen Cunningham, a teetotaler, said predictions of problems associated with legal sales of liquor have not come true.‘Overall, we are a better community because of it,’ Madisonville allows package stores and sales by-the-drink in restaurants but no bars.
progress

Hindman, KY

#8 Apr 16, 2012
Georgetown passed liquor by the drink in restaurants in November of 2000. They now have an Appleby’s, O’Charley’s, Me Mexico, and a Ruby Tuesday which all came in after they went "wet". Two more well known restaurants have taken out options on property (Outback and Olive Garden) and five existing restaurants now serve alcohol including Reno’s, China Buffet, Skyline, El Grande and the Plumtree .

Georgetown also attracted some major anchor stores including a large pharmacy, Lowes, Home Depot plus numerous smaller retail shops that are now open or under construction.

Since Murray Kentucky began serving liquor by the drink in April of 2001, four new restaurants have opened which serve alcohol which include the Big Apple that moved from across the Tennessee line and expanded their offerings, Applebee’s, Tom’s Grille, and The Bull Pen and one more is under construction. Six existing restaurants also began serving alcohol. In addition, four new non-alcohol serving restaurants (Ryan’s Family Steakhouse, A&W/Long John Silvers, Huddle House, and Bad Bob’s Barbecue) have opened. More restaurants are rumored to be looking into locating in Murray. See Press Release April 2, 2002
progress

Hindman, KY

#9 Apr 16, 2012
Goal: Economic Impact
The current restaurants serving alcohol in Murray are expected to gross in excess of $5-8 million in 2002. Most of the restaurants are reporting record sales and virtually every restaurant (whether it serves alcohol or not) is filled on the weekends. A large number of visitors from around the region are coming to Calloway County to eat and to shop. Local retailers, entertainment venues and hotels are reporting a boost in sales as well.

Goal: New Jobs
The new restaurants in Murray have added more than 500 new jobs in the community. And that does not take into account the other non-food related businesses which have recently opened.
progress

Hindman, KY

#10 Apr 16, 2012
The Murray County Chamber of Commerce stated that a development consultant informed him that where Murray was not even a consideration before, it is now on the scope for expansions.

Tax Impact of Alcohol Sales:
The city of Murray forecasted that they would collect $25,000 in alcohol taxes. Through December of 2001, over $85,000 had been collected which has been used, in part, for alcohol law enforcement activities. The rest will go into the general fund.

A local preacher who was adamantly opposed to holding a local option election in Murray was recently interviewed by the local newspaper. In it he was quoted for saying something like "allowing liquor sales in restaurants had not ruined Murray like he had anticipated. Actually a lot of good has come from it."

Tourism Dollars
With the recent announcements of 2001 tourism expenditures being released across Kentucky, It has been noted that in Scott County (where Georgetown was one of the first to pass local option), their tourism dollars rose 7.1% in 2001. This was in a year when some regions were down as much as 10%. Calloway County saw an increase of 2.7%(Murray went "wet" in 2000) and Todd County was up .5%(Guthrie also went "wet" in 2000). We will have to wait for next year's figures to see how Kuttawa (Lyon County) has increased in tourism expenditures since The Santa Fe Restaurant didn't open until Fall of 2001.
mmm

Hindman, KY

#11 Apr 16, 2012
This is something stevie terry would post.
progress

Hindman, KY

#12 Apr 16, 2012
progress wrote:
Kuttawa (who passed local option in the Fall of 2000) actually had to build a restaurant in order to offer liquor by the drink. A Santa Fe restaurant opened in the Fall of 2001. This small community just announced that they will be getting a $2 million dollar plant which will bring 100 new jobs to the community! This Michigan-based plant had considered Clarksville, TN. and other locations. And yet they chose Kuttawa, Kentucky!
One of the officials with this new industry informed residents that the Santa Fe Restaurant definitely played a part in their selection of Kuttawa. Kuttawa would never have been included on the list of possible locations if the community had been dry. His reasoning was that when they have clients in town, they want to be able take them to a nice restaurant where they have a choice to drink or not. It is a quality of life issue and a certain expectation people have when they come to an area. See Press Release May 17, 2002
haha put your nuts and disagree above my FACTS all you want there facts straight outta newspapers and tourist commities , so if thats all you got go for it!!!! LMAO!!!
Tessa

Hindman, KY

#13 Apr 16, 2012
LOL, I love how you've posted everything from credible sources like medical journals and police reports, and people are still "disagreeing" with you. It would be funny if not so sad. And honestly, it's starting to get frightening. I don't know what planet some of these people are from, but it's not this one.

Great job with doing adequate research and telling the truth. We need more people like you on the right side.
progress

Hindman, KY

#14 Apr 16, 2012
Tessa wrote:
LOL, I love how you've posted everything from credible sources like medical journals and police reports, and people are still "disagreeing" with you. It would be funny if not so sad. And honestly, it's starting to get frightening. I don't know what planet some of these people are from, but it's not this one.
Great job with doing adequate research and telling the truth. We need more people like you on the right side.
Thanks,i have been talking to alot of people that have said after reading these facts,that they would now consider voting wet, i am printing all my research out in my office and intend on making flyers and things, people need to know the truth and quit being so blind to the world around us
progress

Hindman, KY

#15 Apr 16, 2012
progress wrote:
This firm now has other companies contacting them expressing interest in moving to Kuttawa. This is a town with a population of 535 people! It doesn't even have a bank nor a grocery store! They will soon! Just watch and see!
Prestonsburg, Ashland, Madisonville, and Morehead all have voted to allow the sale of alcohol within the last ten to twenty years. They were our most recent communities to "go wet" up until the Fall of 2000.
The Alcohol Beverage Control Officers (Known as ABC officers) in each of these communities have reported a decrease in DUI's and public intoxication. Bootleggers have either been forced out of business or have legitimized what they do by opening liquor stores.
To the person that put there little clueless bulb above this, you are the one clueless,these are facts ,and you can look it up all you want mr.clueless
whats really sad

Virgie, KY

#16 Apr 16, 2012
progress wrote:
<quoted text>Thanks,i have been talking to alot of people that have said after reading these facts,that they would now consider voting wet, i am printing all my research out in my office and intend on making flyers and things, people need to know the truth and quit being so blind to the world around us
The truly sad part is, that those who have actually lived in other places outside of these mountains for any real length of time, have known these facts and article comments you posted long before this election ever happened.

People here are just so far out of touch with how the real world operates and is, that they don't even have a clue when something is actually "Good" for their community, because they've been cave-dwellers most of their lives and cannot imagine how alcohol sales could possible be such a tremendous advantage to their county as a whole!

Simply put, most here are nothing more than Narrow minded and blind to anything that anyone wants besides them. Even if it is actually for the good of the community at large.

“They terk urrr jerbs”

Since: Feb 12

hillbilly hell( the hollers)

#17 Apr 16, 2012
The fair tax system would bring more money in then booze would..www.fairtax.org

“They terk urrr jerbs”

Since: Feb 12

hillbilly hell( the hollers)

#18 Apr 16, 2012
Texas,and Kentucky have more dry counties then any other state..
agree

Hindman, KY

#19 Apr 16, 2012
thats true, but they think cause they got coal here thats enough jobs, well coal is drying up,and its not gonna be here forever,people need to open there eyes and start considering other options such as new businneses and factorys, im all for coal but its not gonna last forever we need more outsiders to wanna come in and to bring them in we need things here
whats really sad

Virgie, KY

#20 Apr 16, 2012
Most people in this county have no problem with trying to push to increase the tourism industry here as a supplement to the coal industry which is dying off at an alarming rate now! There is a lot of beautiful places to see here in Knott Co.! Some great places for tourists to go ATV or Trail Riding, or even horseback riding and some good places to camp as well!

BUT!, Most of the people you are trying to LURE IN HERE, Like it or Not people, DO like to be able to go someplace nice to eat and have a DRINK if they so choose WITHOUT having to drive 20 fricking miles to do so! SO DO those CEO'S and Big Wigs from so many OTHER INDUSTRIES!

So, Bottom line, if you don't WISE UP and pass this and Stop Forcing those TOURISTS you want in here spending money LOCALLY to help Better your hometown and community and to be able to later offer even MORE Tourism to those people, they WILL NOT COME! Not more than ONCE anyways! Bank on that while you who oppose this think you're being the "Smart ones"! You're actually being the Dumbass ones in it all!

Tourists will NOT keep coming where they can't get a drink if they want one!
BUSINESSES will not OPEN HERE if they cannot draw people IN TO SELL TO!

You idiots think you're being smart, while all the counties surrounding you are all BOOMING and GROWING! Why? Because they got their heads outta their asses a long time ago and REALIZED THESE TRUTHS!

By the time you all finally figure this stuff out, say 15 or 20 years from now when the entire county is even MORE dead and dried up than it is now, it'll all be too late to start being smart then!
sorry

Hindman, KY

#21 Apr 16, 2012
im sorry to say i voted dry, i have lived here my whole life born and raised, but here in the last couple days ive been reading alot on here and other places and i think i made the wrong choice, i thought i was keeping my children safe from things,but all i was doing is keeping my kids from bettering there selfs here in a county i love so dearly and am proud to be a part of, but my daughter is having to drive almost an hr to work and an hr back to a job that could be right here in our county, and so do i.. my daughter is in college and is working 13 hrs a day plus college and she never gets to be home because of being on the road so much having to travel plus the expense of gas for driving so far, she says when she graduates shes leaving because theres nothing here , i myself and my family will be voting wet next time

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Hindman Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
child molester working for county 19 min Ikr 8
Bible study rules for public schools proposed (Feb '10) 23 min ChromiuMan 131,963
Heath johnson 26 min Ikr 3
brandon stacy 1 hr Neighbor 5
who robbed subway 2 hr Teresa 49
danny slone (Feb '10) 2 hr Smart Guy 15
who's the best singer in Knott co. 4 hr Bethany 1
Hindman Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Hindman People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Hindman News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Hindman

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 6:00 am PST

Bleacher Report 6:00AM
Preview, Prediction for Bengals vs. Broncos
Bleacher Report 8:00 AM
NFL Power Rankings Week 17: Predicting Post-Monday Night Football Standings
NBC Sports10:10 AM
Why does Cincinnati shrink in the spotlight?
NBC Sports11:58 AM
Panthers add Frank Alexander to 53-man roster
NBC Sports 1:27 PM
Another strong December has Panthers on playoff doorstep - NBC Sports