Fired police dispatcher sues Hillside

Should someone with narcolepsy - a neurological disorder that can cause people to unexpectedly fall asleep - be allowed to work as a police dispatcher? That's the question raised in a federal lawsuit by a ... Full Story
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brian

Bloomingdale, IL

#1 Mar 5, 2009
Hillside should just settle with her for the sum of $25,000,000.
Sarah

Waterloo, IA

#2 Mar 5, 2009
Why would she even take a job like that to begin with?
That's like taking a job as an air traffic controller knowing you might be sleeping some of the time.
How nice & thoughtful.
Glen

Cave Spring, GA

#3 Mar 5, 2009
They should counter sue for not telling her employer about her condition. She would have put others at risk over her stupidity. People can be unbelievable.
Taxpayer

Lake Zurich, IL

#4 Mar 5, 2009
Ambulence chasing trial lawyers are scum.

We need tort reform now.

It will never happen.
Kathryn

Northbrook, IL

#5 Mar 5, 2009
Taxpayer wrote:
Ambulence chasing trial lawyers are scum.
We need tort reform now.
It will never happen.
This isn't a tort, numbskull. Her claim arises under the ADA, which is a law passed by Congress. Personal injury lawyers have nothing to do with it.

Incidentally, if she is in fact able to control the condition with medication, as the article says, then she probably has a valid case under the ADA. I'm not saying I don't think there's plenty wrong with the ADA (especially after the most recent revisions), but it has absolutely nothing to do with tort reform.
donlarson

Lake Saint Louis, MO

#6 Mar 5, 2009
The police dept should bill her for their lost salary, loss of time and man power while training her and get their salary they paid her back. Sounds like a very dishonest chic to me. She could have disclosed her condition in her application and not wasted the depts time and the tax payers money. Sure wouldn't want to buy a used car from her. Lock her up and throw they key away. Maybe if she had been honest the dept would have considered her for a different position that did not put the police and community in grave danger.
Elmhurst Mom

United States

#7 Mar 5, 2009
ADA requires REASONABLE accomadation. Asking Hillside to put police officers and people who live in the village in danger to keep her on the job does not sound reasonable to me.
Has her condition and its ability to be controlled been documented by an MD?
Pay $$ no way- I'll donate to the Hillside defense fund and so will everyone who remembers Officer Anthony Raymond
ResumeWriter

United States

#8 Mar 5, 2009
Most job applications have a section that asks if you have any limitations that prevent you from properly performing the job.(Within ADA compliance.) If she answered 'no', then the Bensenville PD was within their right to fire her; she lied on a legal document - this wouldn't even have to go to court.

If she answered yes, but then gave a description of her condition and treatment, she may have a case since she would have disclosed it upfront, but it doesn't appear that she did.
Taxpayer

Lake Zurich, IL

#9 Mar 5, 2009
Sorry rocket scientist, did you know that the ADA was written by ambulence chasing trial lawyers?

Did you also know that Congress is nothing but a bunch of ambulence chasing trial lawyers that were too stupid to make it a living?
Kathryn wrote:
<quoted text>
This isn't a tort, numbskull. Her claim arises under the ADA, which is a law passed by Congress. Personal injury lawyers have nothing to do with it.
Incidentally, if she is in fact able to control the condition with medication, as the article says, then she probably has a valid case under the ADA. I'm not saying I don't think there's plenty wrong with the ADA (especially after the most recent revisions), but it has absolutely nothing to do with tort reform.
Kathryn

Northbrook, IL

#11 Mar 5, 2009
Elmhurst Mom wrote:
ADA requires REASONABLE accomadation. Asking Hillside to put police officers and people who live in the village in danger to keep her on the job does not sound reasonable to me.
Has her condition and its ability to be controlled been documented by an MD?
Right, but if it is in fact controllable by medication, then there is no accommodation necessary. The article isn't entirely clear about that--was she telling her supervisor about the condition because she was worried that it WASN'T completely under control? Even so, there might be an argument that there are reasonable accommodations that could have allowed her to perform the job. Are all shifts scheduled with just one dispatcher?

My personal opinion is that the ADA, while it does some good for truly disabled people who are discriminated against, nonetheless "protects" a lot of things that shouldn't necessarily be protectible. At the same time, people shouldn't be so quick to dismiss this as a frivolous suit. Under the law as it currently stands, she may very well have a perfectly valid claim.
Bob Watliski

United States

#12 Mar 5, 2009
So... did she disclose this condition when she interviewed for the job? No? The she SHOULD BE FIRED!!!

“http://tinyurl.c om/dgnlyl”

Since: May 08

Buffalo Grove, IL - HR-676!!!

#13 Mar 5, 2009
Sarah wrote:
Why would she even take a job like that to begin with?
That's like taking a job as an air traffic controller knowing you might be sleeping some of the time.
How nice & thoughtful.
Agree!!- what a bunch of hoo-ee, "Me, me, me, I'm ENTITLED to a job, I DON'T CARE if it causes harm to anyone else!! Me, FIrst, ME, ME, ME!"
Kathryn

Northbrook, IL

#14 Mar 5, 2009
Taxpayer wrote:
Sorry rocket scientist, did you know that the ADA was written by ambulence chasing trial lawyers?
Did you also know that Congress is nothing but a bunch of ambulence chasing trial lawyers that were too stupid to make it a living?
<quoted text>
Oh, right, I forgot that all trial lawyers "chase ambulances." And every member of Congress is a failed former personal injury lawyer. And they give other ambulance chasers the unfettered ability to write laws, and they just pass them without input from any other groups. My bad. Now I just feel silly.
Joe

Bellwood, IL

#15 Mar 5, 2009
Bob Watliski wrote:
So... did she disclose this condition when she interviewed for the job? No? The she SHOULD BE FIRED!!!
I agree. What happens when an officer or a citizen needs immediate help and she is sleeping the night away? The city will get sued big time. She is a liability.
Noreen

Lincoln, IL

#16 Mar 5, 2009
Is this person kidding about working as a police dispatcher and having a sleep disorder???? Why not work as an air traffic controller at an airport..........NO WAY SHOULD THIS PERSON BE ABLE TO SUE OVER THIS SITUATION!!!! And if the captain knew about it he/she should lose their job as well.
Steve

Chicago, IL

#17 Mar 5, 2009
Kathryn wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh, right, I forgot that all trial lawyers "chase ambulances." And every member of Congress is a failed former personal injury lawyer. And they give other ambulance chasers the unfettered ability to write laws, and they just pass them without input from any other groups. My bad. Now I just feel silly.
Don't feel silly, Kathryn... "Taxpayer" is probably as much of a "Taxpayer" as Joe the Plumber... Fortunately, in this country, every idiot has a right to be heard...
Ozzie Guillen

Springfield, IL

#18 Mar 5, 2009
She might win under ADA. But, if she didn't disclose the condition on her application, and it can be determined that she intentionally ommited the fact, she can be fired for lying on the application.
Pat

United States

#19 Mar 5, 2009
WHAT! WHAT! WHAT HAPPENED!
nooneuknow

Highwood, IL

#20 Mar 5, 2009
There is obviously a generalization about narcolepsy because it has been portrayed on shows such as 'Saturday Night Live' as a big joke. People with this disorder don't 'sleep the night away', as one poster stated, and often cannot sleep at night at ALL, which is why it is called a 'sleep disorder'. Completely controlled by medication, narcolepsy does not fall into the category of limiting a person's ability to do their job. Would you have felt the same way if she was diabetic? Mild narcolepsy, controlled by medication, does not hamper a person's ability to work, drive a car, be a parent, etc. Also, people who have this disorder can be in total control. If not, you would hear about this type of thing more than once in a blue moon. Stop being so nasty.
Apollo

Chicago, IL

#21 Mar 5, 2009
ResumeWriter wrote:
Most job applications have a section that asks if you have any limitations that prevent you from properly performing the job.(Within ADA compliance.) If she answered 'no', then the Bensenville PD was within their right to fire her; she lied on a legal document - this wouldn't even have to go to court.
If she answered yes, but then gave a description of her condition and treatment, she may have a case since she would have disclosed it upfront, but it doesn't appear that she did.
By far the most valid point brought up in the discussion. Lying on an application is always a good legal reason to terminate someone.

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