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Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#1 Mar 7, 2013
Do you believe an IP Address can put someone behind bars? What do you think?
Mr X

Mission, TX

#2 Mar 7, 2013
Mr H wrote:
Do you believe an IP Address can put someone behind bars? What do you think?
I guess it depends on who said what. Why do you ask?
Mr X

Mission, TX

#3 Mar 7, 2013
Still waiting on your plan of attack.
Miss J

Hebbronville, TX

#4 Mar 7, 2013
for example if someone is being abused, bullied, gossiped about stating false accusations, and mentioning peoples names without their consent, or if there being threatened; the person who is getting attacked as per say this website, he/she would have to contact his/her lawyer or attorney, and the next step from there is that the lawyers will subpoena topix or whatever website for the IP addresses, and once topix or whichever website it is hands them the IP address of the people writing things about that person, they will find out who the person is, and location and send them a subpoena as well, and that's when the targeted person decides if he/she wants to take action. It can put you behind bars if you belittle someone, harass a person, call names, cyberbully someone. prosecutors have sometimes used existing laws in the books to prosecute individuals suspected of cyberbullying. What most people don't know is that The act of cyberbullying (bullying through the Internet or cell phone) may be a crime, even if there is no specific cyberbullying law. It is already ILLEGAL in your state to threaten someone with injury and to harass or stalk another person. If a cell phone or the Internet is involved with any of these acts, then the victim has been cyberbullied. If you’re under 18 and charged with a cyberbullying offense, you could be taken to juvenile detention. The court decides whether to release you pending trial and under what terms you’ll be released. For example, you may be restricted from using the Internet until the case is concluded or placed on house arrest. Most likely you’ll be restricted from any contact with the victim.

If you’re found guilty of the offense, the court can place you on probation with specific terms including community service hours, counseling, and a period of time in jail or detention. You could also be eligible for a diversion program, which if completed, may let you avoid a permanent record.

Heres what happened to people OVER 18 who were cyberbullying and calling other girl names:

In August of 2009, 18-year-old Keeley Houton was sentenced for the online harassment of another teenager in Texas. Keeley was ordered to spend three months at a juvenile facility and have no contact with the victim for five years.
law works both ways

Lockhart, TX

#5 Mar 7, 2013
Miss J wrote:
for example if someone is being abused, bullied, gossiped about stating false accusations, and mentioning peoples names without their consent, or if there being threatened; the person who is getting attacked as per say this website, he/she would have to contact his/her lawyer or attorney, and the next step from there is that the lawyers will subpoena topix or whatever website for the IP addresses, and once topix or whichever website it is hands them the IP address of the people writing things about that person, they will find out who the person is, and location and send them a subpoena as well, and that's when the targeted person decides if he/she wants to take action. It can put you behind bars if you belittle someone, harass a person, call names, cyberbully someone. prosecutors have sometimes used existing laws in the books to prosecute individuals suspected of cyberbullying. What most people don't know is that The act of cyberbullying (bullying through the Internet or cell phone) may be a crime, even if there is no specific cyberbullying law. It is already ILLEGAL in your state to threaten someone with injury and to harass or stalk another person. If a cell phone or the Internet is involved with any of these acts, then the victim has been cyberbullied. If youÂ’re under 18 and charged with a cyberbullying offense, you could be taken to juvenile detention. The court decides whether to release you pending trial and under what terms youÂ’ll be released. For example, you may be restricted from using the Internet until the case is concluded or placed on house arrest. Most likely youÂ’ll be restricted from any contact with the victim.

If youÂ’re found guilty of the offense, the court can place you on probation with specific terms including community service hours, counseling, and a period of time in jail or detention. You could also be eligible for a diversion program, which if completed, may let you avoid a permanent record.

Heres what happened to people OVER 18 who were cyberbullying and calling other girl names:

In August of 2009, 18-year-old Keeley Houton was sentenced for the online harassment of another teenager in Texas. Keeley was ordered to spend three months at a juvenile facility and have no contact with the victim for five years.
IP addresses only happen by lawyer if harm was done. For example Like sucide and loss of job or something in that nature.. Stating opinions on someone is not bully as of amendment 1 freed of speech. It is very hard to hold someone to bullying on Internet/cell phone. If that were the case topix would not exist because of law suits. Now just be aware that if something were to occur you will have you trash exposed in court and if true no case will be filed. Now they can counter sue you for violating their rights on their rights on opinions. I had my name slandered and they told me my lawyer nothing could be done cause something like loss of job or death occurred because of it. Be ready and make sure to be prepared to have your trash out there cause I promise u you will be on the witness stand to prove you are or not what they say. Make sure you are guilty free before you do anything. Think of rape victims. How they are torn apart even though they are not to blame.
Mr X

Mission, TX

#6 Mar 8, 2013
First, an IP address doesn't automatically identify a criminal suspect. It's just a unique address for a device connected to the Internet, much like a street address identifies a building. In most cases, an IP address will identify a router that one or more computers use to connect to the Internet. Sometimes a router's IP address might correspond fairly well to a specific user—for example, a person who lives alone and has a password-protected wireless network. And tracking the IP addresses associated with a person over time can create a detailed portrait of her movements and activities in private spaces, as we've pointed out in a case in which the government is seeking IP addresses of several Twitter users in connection with the criminal investigation of Wikileaks.
But in many situations, an IP address isn't personally identifying at all. When it traces back to a router that connects to many computers at a library, cafe, university, or to an open wireless network, VPN or Tor(It's a common acronym in business and stands for Terms of Reference) exit relay used by any number of people, an IP address alone doesn't identify the sender of a specific message. And because of pervasive problems like botnets and malware, suspect IP addresses increasingly turn out to be mere stepping stones for the person actually "using" the computer—a person who is nowhere nearby.This means an IP address is nothing more than a piece of information, a clue. An IP address alone is not probable cause that a person has committed a crime. Furthermore, search warrants executed solely on the basis of IP addresses have a significant likelihood of wasting officers' time and resources rather than producing helpful leads.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#7 Mar 8, 2013
Miss J wrote:
for example if someone is being abused, bullied, gossiped about stating false accusations, and mentioning peoples names without their consent, or if there being threatened; the person who is getting attacked as per say this website, he/she would have to contact his/her lawyer or attorney, and the next step from there is that the lawyers will subpoena topix or whatever website for the IP addresses, and once topix or whichever website it is hands them the IP address of the people writing things about that person, they will find out who the person is, and location and send them a subpoena as well, and that's when the targeted person decides if he/she wants to take action. It can put you behind bars if you belittle someone, harass a person, call names, cyberbully someone. prosecutors have sometimes used existing laws in the books to prosecute individuals suspected of cyberbullying. What most people don't know is that The act of cyberbullying (bullying through the Internet or cell phone) may be a crime, even if there is no specific cyberbullying law. It is already ILLEGAL in your state to threaten someone with injury and to harass or stalk another person. If a cell phone or the Internet is involved with any of these acts, then the victim has been cyberbullied. If youÂ’re under 18 and charged with a cyberbullying offense, you could be taken to juvenile detention. The court decides whether to release you pending trial and under what terms youÂ’ll be released. For example, you may be restricted from using the Internet until the case is concluded or placed on house arrest. Most likely youÂ’ll be restricted from any contact with the victim.

If youÂ’re found guilty of the offense, the court can place you on probation with specific terms including community service hours, counseling, and a period of time in jail or detention. You could also be eligible for a diversion program, which if completed, may let you avoid a permanent record.

Heres what happened to people OVER 18 who were cyberbullying and calling other girl names:

In August of 2009, 18-year-old Keeley Houton was sentenced for the online harassment of another teenager in Texas. Keeley was ordered to spend three months at a juvenile facility and have no contact with the victim for five years.
True to when it comes to wired and non public connections. But since majority of homes now have wireless networks, if not set up properly anyone can "piggy back" and remain anonymous. Instead, the subscriber will get pinned without even knowing what happened. That's why the courts won't use ip addresses anymore. IP addresses are not people...
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#8 Mar 8, 2013
law works both ways wrote:
<quoted text>IP addresses only happen by lawyer if harm was done. For example Like sucide and loss of job or something in that nature.. Stating opinions on someone is not bully as of amendment 1 freed of speech. It is very hard to hold someone to bullying on Internet/cell phone. If that were the case topix would not exist because of law suits. Now just be aware that if something were to occur you will have you trash exposed in court and if true no case will be filed. Now they can counter sue you for violating their rights on their rights on opinions. I had my name slandered and they told me my lawyer nothing could be done cause something like loss of job or death occurred because of it. Be ready and make sure to be prepared to have your trash out there cause I promise u you will be on the witness stand to prove you are or not what they say. Make sure you are guilty free before you do anything. Think of rape victims. How they are torn apart even though they are not to blame.
Nice... Which is why it's best not to post any names or any specifics. That way it's left to interpretation.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#9 Mar 8, 2013
Mr X wrote:
First, an IP address doesn't automatically identify a criminal suspect. It's just a unique address for a device connected to the Internet, much like a street address identifies a building. In most cases, an IP address will identify a router that one or more computers use to connect to the Internet. Sometimes a router's IP address might correspond fairly well to a specific user—for example, a person who lives alone and has a password-protected wireless network. And tracking the IP addresses associated with a person over time can create a detailed portrait of her movements and activities in private spaces, as we've pointed out in a case in which the government is seeking IP addresses of several Twitter users in connection with the criminal investigation of Wikileaks.
But in many situations, an IP address isn't personally identifying at all. When it traces back to a router that connects to many computers at a library, cafe, university, or to an open wireless network, VPN or Tor(It's a common acronym in business and stands for Terms of Reference) exit relay used by any number of people, an IP address alone doesn't identify the sender of a specific message. And because of pervasive problems like botnets and malware, suspect IP addresses increasingly turn out to be mere stepping stones for the person actually "using" the computer—a person who is nowhere nearby.This means an IP address is nothing more than a piece of information, a clue. An IP address alone is not probable cause that a person has committed a crime. Furthermore, search warrants executed solely on the basis of IP addresses have a significant likelihood of wasting officers' time and resources rather than producing helpful leads.
Excellent post X. Even now piracy and torrent downloading is finding it's way through loop-holes.
Definitely

United States

#10 Mar 14, 2013
Mr H wrote:
Do you believe an IP Address can put someone behind bars? What do you think?
Yes, Mr. H, it is possible. There's a program you buy & install to do so or with a push of a few keys on your PC you can bring them up, but then you have to search the web to check where it came from. It's not hard at all.
Btw, you can also BLOCK your IP address(es). Again, with just a simple push of a few keys/ program. Whichever you choose to use/do.
Definitely

United States

#11 Mar 14, 2013
Mr X wrote:
First, an IP address doesn't automatically identify a criminal suspect. It's just a unique address for a device connected to the Internet, much like a street address identifies a building. In most cases, an IP address will identify a router that one or more computers use to connect to the Internet. Sometimes a router's IP address might correspond fairly well to a specific user—for example, a person who lives alone and has a password-protected wireless network. And tracking the IP addresses associated with a person over time can create a detailed portrait of her movements and activities in private spaces, as we've pointed out in a case in which the government is seeking IP addresses of several Twitter users in connection with the criminal investigation of Wikileaks.
But in many situations, an IP address isn't personally identifying at all. When it traces back to a router that connects to many computers at a library, cafe, university, or to an open wireless network, VPN or Tor(It's a common acronym in business and stands for Terms of Reference) exit relay used by any number of people, an IP address alone doesn't identify the sender of a specific message. And because of pervasive problems like botnets and malware, suspect IP addresses increasingly turn out to be mere stepping stones for the person actually "using" the computer—a person who is nowhere nearby.This means an IP address is nothing more than a piece of information, a clue. An IP address alone is not probable cause that a person has committed a crime. Furthermore, search warrants executed solely on the basis of IP addresses have a significant likelihood of wasting officers' time and resources rather than producing helpful leads.
This is so true! You can find out where it comes from, but you still need to find out who did the pushing if the keys.
The other problem is that many people have/use unsecured WiFi and that alone can have many users that can go unidentified and nowadays everyone uses and abuses of everyone's Internet services if its not secured.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#12 Mar 16, 2013
Definitely wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, Mr. H, it is possible. There's a program you buy & install to do so or with a push of a few keys on your PC you can bring them up, but then you have to search the web to check where it came from. It's not hard at all.
Btw, you can also BLOCK your IP address(es). Again, with just a simple push of a few keys/ program. Whichever you choose to use/do.
And that's as far as it can go. It still doesn't prove who was sitting in front of the monitor.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#13 Mar 16, 2013
Definitely wrote:
<quoted text>This is so true! You can find out where it comes from, but you still need to find out who did the pushing if the keys.
The other problem is that many people have/use unsecured WiFi and that alone can have many users that can go unidentified and nowadays everyone uses and abuses of everyone's Internet services if its not secured.
So do you still believe it carries enough weight to put someone behind bars?
Concerned

Odem, TX

#14 Mar 16, 2013
Wish it was easier to find. Too many haters on this site
Definitely

United States

#15 Mar 18, 2013
Mr H wrote:
<quoted text>
And that's as far as it can go. It still doesn't prove who was sitting in front of the monitor.
No, Sir! Your computer can be confiscated by ICE for further analysis due to your hard drive having stored all incoming and out going information. This analysis can determine if you/who put out the information that causes/caused issues.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#16 Mar 19, 2013
Definitely wrote:
<quoted text>No, Sir! Your computer can be confiscated by ICE for further analysis due to your hard drive having stored all incoming and out going information. This analysis can determine if you/who put out the information that causes/caused issues.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)

You have a better chance getting your stuff picked up by the CIA. Sure a harddrive can get confiscated but that still doesn't mean who really did it. It could've been the kids, siblings, uncles or aunts, and so on.... Get my drift? The whole point of this post is to educate our community. I've seen scare tactics used here on this site and I'm sure a lot of people bought into it.
Mr H

Corpus Christi, TX

#17 Mar 19, 2013
Has anyone noticed when this site first came up, people tried to hide their identity by writing all jacked up? Lately I've noticed that more and more people are coming out or their shells. Which is good, yet at the same time keep your statements vague and generalized. That should keep you safe from any legal issues. The Internet is the greatest educational tool ever made, use it to better and protect yourself while helping others in the process.
Mr X

Mission, TX

#18 Mar 20, 2013
Mr H wrote:
Has anyone noticed when this site first came up, people tried to hide their identity by writing all jacked up? Lately I've noticed that more and more people are coming out or their shells. Which is good, yet at the same time keep your statements vague and generalized. That should keep you safe from any legal issues. The Internet is the greatest educational tool ever made, use it to better and protect yourself while helping others in the process.
What do you mean hiding their identity? How? By answering your question?
Definitely

Lockhart, TX

#19 Mar 20, 2013
Mr H wrote:
<quoted text>
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
You have a better chance getting your stuff picked up by the CIA. Sure a harddrive can get confiscated but that still doesn't mean who really did it. It could've been the kids, siblings, uncles or aunts, and so on.... Get my drift? The whole point of this post is to educate our community. I've seen scare tactics used here on this site and I'm sure a lot of people bought into it.
I totally agree, Sir, but there are steps and measures that have to be taken, and yes, I got your drift! I just don't think I'd let my children/siblings take the rap for something I did. Then again, not everyone thinks that way.
As for the hiding part, some do pretend to be a little less educated then they really are. All just to try and mislead the ones that do know them and their way if thinking.
Mr X

Mission, TX

#20 Mar 20, 2013
Definitely wrote:
<quoted text>
I totally agree, Sir, but there are steps and measures that have to be taken, and yes, I got your drift! I just don't think I'd let my children/siblings take the rap for something I did. Then again, not everyone thinks that way.
As for the hiding part, some do pretend to be a little less educated then they really are. All just to try and mislead the ones that do know them and their way if thinking.
If you're the type of individual who feels that "SOME OF US" have answers to every question, you may not have had that experience, or you may have felt that the question really was stupid and shouldn't have been asked in the first place. Making commitments when you don't know all the answers can actually make things worse than if you had simply said you didn't know it and would get back to whoever started the topic with the correct answer.

But it must be remembered that, while saying the words "I don't know" can be a strength, incomplete understanding on your part must be followed up with finding the actual answer and then getting back with the correct information. Otherwise, saying "I don't know" to a person is simply a weakness that demonstrates a lack of caring.

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