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Since: Jun 10

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#1 Mar 24, 2012
Want to know who has been busted, when, where, and why?
If you pickup your local newspaper you will see the most recent arrest. And alot of your local Sheriff Depts are starting to post online names and info of all drug bust and locations so parents and neighbors can be aware. You can even Google Hazard, KY drug bust and find all kinds of them new and old. So, if you want to post your findings or info posted in your local paper, please do so here! If they don't like to see there names and arrest on here then they shouldn't have done what they did!

Since: Jun 10

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#2 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – A Perry County man already facing 10 years in prison for drug trafficking pleaded guilty to additional drug charges on Thursday.

Lonnie Standafer, 57, of Scuddy, was one of 14 people arrested during a police roundup in Perry County in November 2010. A superseding indictment returned on November 19 charged Standafer with three counts of first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance second offense, a Class B felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison, and one count of third-degree trafficking second offense, a Class D felony which calls for up to five years in prison.

He pled guilty to amended charges of drug trafficking in March in exchange for a 10-year prison sentence, and was set for sentencing Thursday in Perry Circuit Court. Before that sentence could be handed down, however, he pled guilty to additional charges in a separate case.

Standafer waived his right to have his case heard before a grand jury and proceeded to admit to charges against him alleging that on November 12, 2010 he possessed methadone, hydrocodone and alprazolam with the intent to sell the drugs. He pleaded guilty to one count each of first, second and third-degree trafficking, and an additional charge of possession of marijuana. An agreement announced on Thursday indicates that Standafer will be sentenced to 10 years in prison in the second case, which will run concurrently with the sentence handed down in the other case for a total of 10 years to serve.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Man pleads guilty to charges in second trafficking case

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#3 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – A Perry County man was sentenced to serve 10 years in prison Thursday following guilty pleas in separate drug dealing cases.

Glenn Messer, 42, of Scuddy, was initially indicted in November 2010. He faced two counts of first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance for selling oxycodone to a witness cooperating with police on two separate occasions in June of last year. He was arrested at a residence in Scuddy as part of a state police roundup last autumn.

Messer pleaded guilty to both counts of trafficking for a total sentence of eight years to serve. That sentence was handed down on Thursday, and Messer's prison term in the first case will be served consecutively with the sentence in a second case in which he was indicted earlier this year on one count each of first-degree trafficking, third-degree trafficking, possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

He pleaded guilty to each of the additional charges as well, with the exception of the first-degree trafficking charge which was amended down to second-degree. He received a total sentence of two years to serve in the second case, for a total of 10 years in both cases.

Messer was credited with 189 days served prior to Thursday’s sentencing.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Man gets 10 years in drug dealing cases

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#4 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – A Hazard man who violated his probation after being charged with drug trafficking was sentenced Thursday to spend the next 10 years in prison, just before he was served with an indictment in a third trafficking case.

Gordon Napier, 73, was sentenced in two cases dating back to 2006 in which he was convicted for selling drugs in Perry County. Charged with multiple counts of drug trafficking and trafficking within 1,000 yards of a school, Napier had originally been sentenced to serve probation in the cases, but when he picked up charges in May in a new trafficking case his probation was revoked.

Napier was set for sentencing on Thursday, at which time defense attorney Michael Roper discussed an alternative sentencing plan for Napier, who Roper said is a veteran and dealing with medical complications. The alternative plan would have had Napier serve out his sentence at the veterans center in Hazard if he was accepted to the facility. Commonwealth’s Attorney Teresa Reed opposed the plan, however, noting that the veterans center is not a secure facility like a prison, and Napier should be able to receive adequate medical care while incarcerated.

“I don’t think it’s in the best interest of the community” to allow Napier to serve his sentence in the veterans center, Reed said.

Circuit Judge Bill Engle rejected the offer for an alternative sentence and proceeded to sentence Napier to a total of 10 years in prison, but more time could potentially be added as an indictment against Napier, also alleging drug trafficking, was unsealed during his court appearance.

His latest charges stem from his arrest in May by officers with the Hazard Police Department, who charged Napier with drug trafficking after authorities say they seized several methadone and suboxone tablets, as well as $3,000 in cash. He is facing additional charges of second and third-degree trafficking and one count of persistent felony offender.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Man gets 10 years for drug dealing also facing additional charges

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#5 Mar 24, 2012
Paul Prosperino
slideshow HAZARD – A former college professor was sentenced to spend the next 10 years in prison on drug trafficking charges.

Paul A. Prosperino, 58, was arrested in October 2009 and charged with trafficking drugs after police found thousands of pills and several firearms at his home on Walnut Street. He was indicted in April 2010 on two counts of second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance, and a subsequent indictment returned in October 2010 added an additional count of second-degree trafficking and one count of trafficking while in possession of a firearm.

An agreement was announced in January in which Prosperino pled guilty to two counts of trafficking. In addition to his guilty plea, the agreement called for the dismissal of the two latter charges stemming from his October indictment, but the deal was not accompanied by a recommended sentence from the commonwealth attorney’s office. Any sentence, then, would be leveled by Circuit Judge Bill Engle, who presided over the case.

Second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance is a Class D felony, punishable by up to five years in prison. Since Prosperino pled to two counts, he faced a maximum of 10 years to serve, though at the discretion of the judge he could have been given probation. That’s exactly what Prosperino pleaded for in a letter he read to the court on Thursday.

“I apologize for getting into the drug culture around here,” Prosperino said.“I am here (in court) because I deserve to be, but never again.”

Prosperino noted that as a former professor at Hazard Community and Technical College, he taught courses in economics and computer science. He said he continues to help family members, and hoped to be able to care for his mother.

“I therefore would like to be considered for probation,” he requested.

Commonwealth Attorney Teresa Reed, however, noted that while Prosperino is a very intelligent man, he used that intelligence to commit crimes, and therefore should be punished accordingly.

“The Commonwealth urges the court to impose the maximum (sentence) in this case,” she said.

Reed produced evidence envelopes that catalogued pills that were seized from Prosperino’s home during his arrest in 2009, noting that over 2,000 pills were found. She said Prosperino was purchasing the pills via the internet from a business in India and having them mailed to an address in Pennsylvania where he would presumably pick them up before transporting them back to Hazard.

“In some ways, this is worse than some ordinary cases,” she added, noting that Prosperino apparently doesn't have a drug addiction and was trafficking pills for profit only.

Judge Engle momentarily studied the case from the bench, eventually noting that he believes the public would be be served best through Prosperino’s incarceration.

Engle handed down the maximum sentence of five years on each count, to run consecutively, for a total of 10 years in prison. In accordance with the plea agreement, the remaining two counts against Prosperino were dismissed. He was also ordered to forfeit $20,000 and any items seized during the investigation.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Former college professor gets 10 years for dealing drugs

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#6 Mar 24, 2012
Editor’s Note: This story is the first in a series covering Perry County’s drug court program, focusing on the progress of clients currently in the program or who have graduated.
HAZARD – Scott Thompson was 18 when he first tried OxyContin, a powerful and highly addictive prescription painkiller. He was still just a teenager when he awoke one morning less than a year later and the realization hit him – he was also an addict.
“I didn’t even know that you could wake up pill sick,” he remembered during an interview with the Herald in November.
For most of the past decade Scott has struggled with addiction. For the last three years he has been a client with the drug court in Hazard.
Drug courts offer an alternative to jail or typical probation by means of a closely supervised program that requires treatment, random drug testing and regular meetings with the drug court staff. Sanctions for veering away from the program’s guidelines or an inability to complete the program include jail time.
Here in Kentucky where there are more deaths from accidental overdoses than automobile accidents, Scott’s story is one of many in the commonwealth that run along similar lines. By his own admission, Scott had a good life growing up. He had caring parents, he did well in school and played basketball. He even enrolled in college after graduating from high school.
But it was during his freshman year that he said what began as something he did for fun spiraled into something else all-together.
“It was just recreational at first, and I never did stop, and it became a habit,” he said.“I went from smoking marijuana to doing prescription drugs, mostly OxyContin. I was literally ignorant to what that drug could do to a person. I just didn’t know.”
In 2008 he was arrested on felony charges in Floyd County. Those charges were amended to misdemeanors and he was accepted into the Floyd County Drug Court. Two weeks later his case was transferred back to his native Perry County.
While other drug courts only accept offenders with misdemeanor charges, the program in Perry County can accept nearly any offender, with one exception being those charged with a violent crime.
“We look at everybody individually,” noted Teresa Huff, drug court coordinator in Perry County, because, she added, each individual case may require different approaches.
In Scott’s case, he was this month evaluated at a center in Breathitt County to determine if there were any issues that might have been the cause of his relapse. Huff described it as “sort of a last-ditch effort” to get him back on track within the framework of drug court.
Like most, Scott’s attempt at overcoming addiction has been an ongoing struggle. Just last month he was remanded to the Kentucky River Regional Jail in Hazard after informing the drug court staff that he had been using synthetic drugs that aren’t detectable in standard drug tests. He spent several days in jail over the Thanksgiving holiday prior to his evaluation.
“He fell in with a crowd that we had that was doing synthetic drugs, and Scott is not a social user … that uses with someone else,” Huff explained early this month.“Scott is the full definition of an addict. That synthetic material that was available really sent him down the wrong path.”
Scott’s progress through drug court was nullified after the incident in November, and he was placed back in Phase I where he was to restart the program from the beginning. His status is now in question, however, after he was jailed again on Friday on a charge of driving under the influence. Drug court officials are currently awaiting the results of a blood test to determine how to proceed. Huff noted that he could be removed from the program, depending on the results of the test.

Since: Jun 10

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#7 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – Aaron Jones began using drugs when he was 16 years old. At first, his drug use was sporadic, usually when he was hanging around with friends at parties. But after a time that use turned into abuse, and what had been fun times turned into addiction.

“I thought back then it was cool, you know, to go around and party with people,” Jones told a crowd packed into the Perry Circuit Courtroom earlier this week.“It destroyed my family.”

He said addiction led to his losing custody of his two children. He stole from his parents to support his habit.“It’s a bad deal what drugs do to you,” he continued.

But that was some time ago, and now Aaron Jones can claim to be drug free, a graduate of the Perry County Drug Court, an intensive program that takes at least 18 months to complete. The program helps addicts charged with certain offenses to stay out of jail and lead productive lives while they kick their addictions.

Jones was one of 10 graduates who shared their stories of triumph over hardship during a ceremony in Hazard on Tuesday, and his story is certainly one of turning things around for the better.

“Because of drug court, I’ve been clean for three years now,” he said.“I’ve got custody of my kids back.”

Former Kentucky Governor Paul Patton, a Pike County native who served as governor from 1995 to 2003, was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s graduation, acknowledging the depth and scope of drug addiction in Kentucky. It’s an issue that has touched everyone in some way, he said.

“This is a major problem, and I don’t know of a family in Kentucky that’s not been affected by it, and that certainly includes my family,” said Patton, who currently serves as president of Pikeville College.

For the graduates, Patton had words of congratulations for the 10 people who are now ready to move on to begin a new stage in their lives.

“I have great admiration for those people that have recognized the problem (of addiction), and committed themselves to conquering this beast,” he said.

Each of the graduates acknowledged that completing the stringent requirements of drug court wasn’t an easy task. James Spencer became a drug court member in Perry County in 2009. He said he hated the program, only going through the motions at first to stay out of jail. It was a few weeks into the program, however, when he realized he had to start his recovery over. He was called in to meet with Circuit Judge Bill Engle, who formed the county’s drug court program in 2005.

“He did all the talking,” Spencer remembered of his meeting with Judge Engle.“Believe me, you could tell by his voice he meant business. He told me ‘straighten up or go to prison,’ and I knew he meant it. That’s the day my life changed.”

In addition to being drug free, graduating from drug court means a great deal, Spencer continued. It means he’s responsible, honest and reliable, and most importantly he has his life back. He’s a parent and a productive member of society, holding a steady job with a local coal company.

Spencer urged those drug court members still working through the program not to waste a month going through the motions like he did, but to get straight from the start, because getting clean is just the beginning of recovery.

“Everything else is just as hard,” he said.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Changing their lives for the better 10 graduate from local drug court program

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#8 Mar 24, 2012
Reviews have called it inspiring, a great read, and courageous, but Jared Combs calls it his former life, which is that of a drug addict.
A Hazard native and pharmacist, first in Hazard, then in Pikeville, and now in Lexington, Combs, a recovering addict of eight years tells the story of his battle with drugs and alcohol, how it effected his job and family, and what life is like after drugs in his book called the Incomprehensible Demoralization: An Addict Pharmacist’s Journey to Recovery.
Combs said he drank alcohol and was a frequent partier in high school and college, but when he graduated from pharmacy school in 1996,“they handed me the keys to the candy store and I got involved in using narcotics.”
He got a job in Hazard at the ARH Pharmacy where he first tried narcotics on the job, and what then began as eventually taking the pills to feel better turned into him needing the drugs just to function in everyday life.
“Really early on in my job at ARH I tried narcotics while on the job and I remember the first day well when I took something while at work,” Combs said.“I was just the happiest person in the whole world. After a large amount of narcotics were taken from the ARH Pharmacy, cameras were installed and Combs said he was caught on camera taking pills for his own use. He was arrested in July 1997 and charged with taking the drugs for his own use and for taking the other pills and faced a federal trial with the possibility of spending 10 to 20 years in prison.
“I was terrified. That was the scariest time of my life, he said while adding the he was taken out of the pharmacy in handcuffs to Ashland where a judge was waiting for him. He was then taken to the Boyd County Detention Center and placed in solitary confinement for five days until his detention hearing.
Combs had to wait three months for his trial after being released from jail, which is when he began drinking heavily everyday.
“I began drinking every single day, vodka as hard as I could drink. I would skip meals so that I could drink,” Combs, a 1990 Hazard High School graduate, said.“First thing in the morning I would wake up and drink vodka just to make it through the day because I was so terrified of going to prison. But on day two of his trial, Combs’ fears of going to prison went away after the prosecutor told him and his attorney that he had serious doubts about Combs’ guilt and could no longer ethically pursue the case. They worked out a deal that involved him spending four weekends in jail and having probation.
“I had to spend four weekends in jail as part of the plea deal. I was high going into the jail and I was high once I got in the jail,” he said.
After the jail time, Combs took a new job in a new town that after a couple of years led to the same results as before.
He said,“I went over to Pikeville and in no time flat I was right back at it. I survived there a couple of years, but in October 2000 I was arrested and once again led out the front of the pharmacy in handcuffs,” but that’s when something changed.
“In the jail I was saying a lot of prayers and I remember something changing - I don’t know how to describe it - but I remember saying to myself ‘I am an alcoholic and a drug addict and I don’t have to keep living this way,’” Combs said.
The next day over a video arraignment he said that he asked the judge if he could go to treatment and the judge agreed. He went to a 30-day treatment center and then to a facility called the Shepherd’s House in Lexington where he spent eight months. After leaving the treatment center, he and his family moved to Lexington and have lived there since.
Combs now works at the University of Kentucky Medical Center Pharmacy, where he has been for the past five years. He is also active in his AA program and church, which is a means of helping him maintain his sobriety.

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#9 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – Three people are facing drug trafficking charges following two separate busts at different hotels in Hazard.

The first bust came early Thursday afternoon as detectives with Operation UNITE and deputies with the Perry County Sheriff’s Office responded to a tip reporting possible drug activity inside a room at the Super 8 motel in Hazard.

Upon arrival at the scene, authorities attempted to make contact with individuals inside the room, said Deputy Joey McKenney. Once the occupants looked out the window and saw police, McKenney said they attempted to flush prescription pills down the toilet before opening the door.

After about a minute or so, he continued, the door opened and police at the scene made entrance and located several pills still in the toilet that had failed to flush and others on the floor around the bowl. McKenney said authorities recovered 35 pills and a small bag of marijuana, including 34 OxyContin tablets.

Authorities arrested three people inside the room, two of whom are from out of state and are facing trafficking charges.

Tammy Sweet, 44, and Kimmie Swangim, 48, both of Fort Wayne, In., were charged with first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and tampering with physical evidence.

A third person, Randy Watts, 24, of Combs, was charged with misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

The second arrest came at Hazard Hotels on Dawahare Drive when officers with the Hazard Police Department responded to a theft complaint made by a woman staying at the hotel.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- 3 face trafficking charges in separate busts at hotels

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#11 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – Three people were arrested Thursday as part of what authorities with the Hazard Police Department say is a tighter focus on combating drug crimes within the city.

HPD Captain Minor Allen said the department has been conducting drug investigations throughout the city, and a recent tip led police to execute a search warrant for a residence on Combs Street Thursday evening.

Allen said authorities located several pills at the Combs Street address, including 35 Xanax, 20 Percocet, one hydrocodone and 14 methadone tablets. Police also made two arrests at the residence time, charging 30-year-old Shelly Akers with first, second and third-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and first-degree possession of a controlled substance, and Henry Adams, 29, of Yeaddis, with one count of first-degree possession of a controlled substance.

That same evening in a separate case, police made another arrest at Cornell Avenue, charging 73-year-old Gordon Napier with second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance, second offense. Napier was also arrested in 2006 by the officers with the Hazard Police Department on a charge of second-degree trafficking.

Police seized several pills from Napier, Allen said, including 59 methadone, two hydrocodone and 10 suboxone tablets, as well as nearly $3,000 in cash.

All three individuals are currently lodged in the Kentucky River Regional Jail as police continue their investigation.

Allen said these three arrests are an example of the department taking a more proactive approach to drug trafficking in the city.

“What we’re trying to do right now is pretty much redouble our efforts,” he said.“The biggest problem we have is prescription drugs. Everything (crime related) in my opinion is related to prescription drug abuse.”

Allen said police in Hazard will begin a tighter focus on what he termed “the root of the problem” of local crime, namely the drug abuse which he contends has led to increases in theft and other offenses.

“Of course, we’re still going to provide all the normal services we normally would, but we’ve got to focus in more on what’s causing these problems,” Allen said.“We’re going to do whatever we can legally do to stop these people.”

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Three arrested in drug busts

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#12 Mar 24, 2012
GLOMAWR – Four people were arrested on drug related charges after a search warrant was executed by Kentucky State Police officers, the HIDTA Task Force and Operation UNITE on Monday April 19.

Police and members of the other two organizations executed the search warrant at the residence of Charles Duff and Daphne Feltner at 268 Raccoon Creek Road in the Glomawr community.

Officers seized almost $2,000 in cash, 49 methadone, three lorcet, 17 xanax and marijuana during the search of the home.

Duff, Feltner, and two other who were in the home at the time, Nancy Wagers and Joel Lewis, were all arrested.

Duff was charged with first, second and third degree trafficking in a controlled substance and possession of marijuana.

Feltner was charged with first and third degree trafficking in a controlled substance and possession of marijuana.

Wagers was charged with first and third degree possession of a controlled substance, and Lewis was charged with first degree possession of a controlled substance.

All party’s arrested are currently being lodged in the Kentucky River Regional Jail, and the investigation is still on-going by detectives from the Kentucky State Police Post 13 in Hazard.

Additional arrests and charges are pending.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Police arrest four in Glomawr drug bust

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#13 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD -- On Tuesday, officers from Kentucky State Police Post 13 Hazard, Operation U.N.I.T.E, Perry County Sheriff’s Office, and Hazard Police Department conducted a controlled buy-bust in the Combs area of Perry County. As a result of the operation three arrests were made and several grams of crack cocaine were confiscated.

Arrested in this sting were Robert Hays and Jeremiah Cardwell of Louisville and Kenneth Cornett, Jr. of Hazard. Hays, who was also wanted on several outstanding warrants out of the Louisville area, was charged with two counts of first-degree trafficking in controlled substance. Cardwell and Cornett were charged with first-degree conspiracy to traffic in controlled substance.

In a related bust, two other men were arrested. Mike Caudill of Hazard was charged with one count each of first-degree possession of controlled substance, second-degree possession of controlled substance, possession of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Eddie Jackson of Hazard was wanted on an outstanding indictment warrant for trafficking in cocaine.

All were lodged in the Kentucky River Regional Jail in Hazard. These arrests are the result of a joint investigation carried out by the Kentucky State Police in Hazard and Operation U.N.I.T.E.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Police make drug arrest in Combs

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#14 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – The Hazard Police Department has arrested five suspects in connection to an investigation about a possible drug trafficking operation in Perry County, Detective Paul Campbell said.

Campbell said the investigation started when a female victim came to police, claiming several items had been stolen from her by a juvenile.

The juvenile confessed to police that he had stolen the items, which were in the possession of Robert Joseph III and his son, Robert Joseph IV at the time of his confession, Campbell said.

The stolen items include jewelry, a firearm, and other items valued at over $20,000.

Both Joseph III and his son were arrested on separate charges of receiving stolen property over $10,000 and receiving a stolen firearm.

Through the course of the investigation, detectives learned that a man known as “Buckethead,” later identified as Richard Combs, 58, of Gregory Branch Road, had allegedly sold controlled substances to the juvenile.

According to the police report, Detectives James Grigsby and Keith Napier, along with Captain Minor Allen of the Hazard Police Department went to Combs’ residence and conducted what Campbell called a “knock and talk,” or consent to search the residence.

Upon gaining consent from Combs and his wife, Betty, and searching the home, police say they discovered an IR-30, or OxyContin pill, Campbell said.

Combs and his wife were both arrested for first-degree possession of a controlled substance.

Another man, Frank Jewell, who was at the home during the search, was frisked and found to be in possession of a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia, according to the police report.

Campbell said police obtained a search warrant and returned to the residence, where they later found methadone, hydrocodone, over $2,000 in cash and drug paraphernalia.

According to the police report, the items seized by the Police Department signify drug trafficking.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Theft case leads to drugs cash

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#15 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – Three people were arrested Thursday as part of what authorities with the Hazard Police Department say is a tighter focus on combating drug crimes within the city.

HPD Captain Minor Allen said the department has been conducting drug investigations throughout the city, and a recent tip led police to execute a search warrant for a residence on Combs Street Thursday evening.

Allen said authorities located several pills at the Combs Street address, including 35 Xanax, 20 Percocet, one hydrocodone and 14 methadone tablets. Police also made two arrests at the residence time, charging 30-year-old Shelly Akers with first, second and third-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and first-degree possession of a controlled substance, and Henry Adams, 29, of Yeaddis, with one count of first-degree possession of a controlled substance.

That same evening in a separate case, police made another arrest at Cornell Avenue, charging 73-year-old Gordon Napier with second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance, second offense. Napier was also arrested in 2006 by the officers with the Hazard Police Department on a charge of second-degree trafficking.

Police seized several pills from Napier, Allen said, including 59 methadone, two hydrocodone and 10 suboxone tablets, as well as nearly $3,000 in cash.

All three individuals are currently lodged in the Kentucky River Regional Jail as police continue their investigation.

Allen said these three arrests are an example of the department taking a more proactive approach to drug trafficking in the city.

“What we’re trying to do right now is pretty much redouble our efforts,” he said.“The biggest problem we have is prescription drugs. Everything (crime related) in my opinion is related to prescription drug abuse.”

Allen said police in Hazard will begin a tighter focus on what he termed “the root of the problem” of local crime, namely the drug abuse which he contends has led to increases in theft and other offenses.

“Of course, we’re still going to provide all the normal services we normally would, but we’ve got to focus in more on what’s causing these problems,” Allen said.“We’re going to do whatever we can legally do to stop these people.”

And that includes aggressively pursuing any crime related to drug abuse, from the top tier trafficker to possessing drugs. Ultimately, though, the HPD’s success in combating drug crimes will rest with community support, Allen added.

“It all comes back to good community oriented policing,” he said.“Without input from the public, a lot of time we’re dead in the water.”

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Three arrested in drug busts

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#16 Mar 24, 2012
HAZARD – Two people were arrested Tuesday afternoon during a raid at a house that police said had been under surveillance for alleged drug trafficking.

Detectives with Operation UNITE, in partnership with the Hazard City Police and Kentucky State Police, raided the home on College Street near Roy G. Eversole Middle School following an undercover investigation by UNITE, said Det. Keith Napier.

Police surrounded the home and arrested Hazard resident Payne Olinger, Jr. before beginning the search. Six other adults and one toddler were in the home at the time of the raid.

Olinger was arrested on a charge of first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance. Police say he was additionally charged on Tuesday with first-degree possession of a controlled substance and first-degree promoting contraband at the Kentucky River Regional Jail after he was allegedly found with cocaine at the facility.

Also charged during the Tuesday’s raid was Eugenia Boggs, who is facing one count of possession of a controlled substance.

Police are still investigating the home and more arrests could be made as evidence is found.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- 2 arrested in Hazard drug bust

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#17 Mar 24, 2012
GLOMAWR – Four people were arrested on drug related charges after a search warrant was executed by Kentucky State Police officers, the HIDTA Task Force and Operation UNITE on Monday April 19.

Police and members of the other two organizations executed the search warrant at the residence of Charles Duff and Daphne Feltner at 268 Raccoon Creek Road in the Glomawr community.

Officers seized almost $2,000 in cash, 49 methadone, three lorcet, 17 xanax and marijuana during the search of the home.

Duff, Feltner, and two other who were in the home at the time, Nancy Wagers and Joel Lewis, were all arrested.

Duff was charged with first, second and third degree trafficking in a controlled substance and possession of marijuana.

Feltner was charged with first and third degree trafficking in a controlled substance and possession of marijuana.

Wagers was charged with first and third degree possession of a controlled substance, and Lewis was charged with first degree possession of a controlled substance.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Police arrest four in Glomawr drug bust

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#18 Mar 24, 2012
Five arrested in drug bust
Hazard Herald (Ky)
6 years ago | 649 views | 0 | 7 ||
Herald Staff Report

Five arrests were made last week and more are pending the outcome of an investigation currently being conducted by the Hazard HIDTA task force.

On January 17, officers with HIDTA, Kentucky State Police, Perry County Sheriff's Office, Kentucky Vehicle Enforcement, and Fish and Wildlife executed three search warrants at residences at Cornett Lane in Perry County. Police seized $5,490 in cash, 21 OxyContin tablets, 30 Methadone wafers, 130 methadone pills, and 33 Oxycodone pills.

Arrested as a result of the investigation are fifty-one year old Sandra Jent, forty-seven year old Patricia Combs, 23 year old John Napier, 26 year old Jimmy Napier, and 53 year old James Combs. Each subject was charged with trafficking in a controlled substance first-degree.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Five arrested in drug bust

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#19 Mar 24, 2012
Major Drug Bust in Hazard-Pike County
by RANDY WALTERS Hazard Herald (Ky)
6 years ago | 637 views | 0 | 4 ||
Staff Reporter

[email protected]

The Hazard City Police, HIDTA (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area), KSP DESI East, and Kentucky State Police Street Level Drug Detectives made a major drug bust in Hazard and Pikeville last Friday. The bust netted approximately 23 ounces of cocaine, hundreds of prescriptions drugs including OxyContin, Hydrocodone pills, and drug paraphernalia items.

The bust started out with the complaint of a stolen purse by one of the employ

ees of the Hazard Hotel on Dawahare Drive next to Reno's. Hazard Police Lt. Colonel Kenny Bryant answered the complaint, and upon investigating saw what he suspected to be cocaine on the floor in one of the rooms.

Lt. Colonel Bryant contacted the HIDTA task force and asked them for assistance. Upon their arrival they discovered approximately eight ounces of cocaine in a plastic bag in a soap dish. They also found drug paraphernalia items and over $900 in cash.

Mary Conley Ortega of Pikeville was arrested and charged with first degree trafficking in a controlled substance, second offense.

The investigation then led HIDTA Detectives to the Pike County residence of Nick R. Ortega at Left Fork of Island Creek. Kentucky State Police Detectives got a search warrant for the Ortega residence, and executed it at 3:00 p.m. last Friday.

At the Ortega residence the detectives, along with Kentucky State Police Troopers from the Pikeville Post, discovered approximately 15 ounces of cocaine, 263 and one half OxyContin tablets, 80 mg. strength, approximately $3,000 in cash, plus other narcotics. The street value of the drugs taken at the Pike County location is estimated to be $55, 566.

The Kentucky State Police attribute the Pike County bust to information received from informants by their street level drug detectives. The detectives utilized the Kentucky State Police Canine Units to help locate the narcotics.

Nick Ortega was not at his residence at the time of the search, and warrants have been issued for his arrest. The Kentucky State Police Street Level Drug Detectives are continuing the investigation which has already taken a major amount of illegal narcotics and drug money off the streets.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Major Drug Bust in Hazard Pike County

Since: Jun 10

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#20 Mar 24, 2012
Traffic stop turns into drug bust
by RANDY WALTERS/Staff Reporter Hazard Herald (Ky)
7 years ago | 120 views | 0 | 2 ||
Hazard Police Sergeant Isaac Whitaker and Patrolman Chris Combs were attempting to serve warrants last Thursday. As they were leaving, Officer Whitaker noticed the car driving in front of them had expired tags.

Sgt. Whitaker then effected a traffic stop, which turned into an arrest on drug charges.

The driver of the 1975 Ford was 34-year-old Michael Hall of Hazard.

"Hall seemed nervous, and with good reason," Officer Combs said.

Once the officers saw what Hall was carrying they understood the nervousness.

In plain view, and on his person they allegedly found a large quantity of marijuana.

Once the marijuana had been found, Hall began telling the officers where more dope was present in the car. The officers found a large quantity of marijuana and some Methadone pills in the vehicle's trunk.

Hall was charged with expired plates, no registration receipt, failure to produce an insurance card, no insurance, DUI , first-degree drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, first-degree trafficking in marijuana, possession of controlled substance (first offense), prescription controlled substance not in proper container, illegal possession of legend drugs, failure to wear seat belt and improper signal.

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY)- Traffic stop turns into drug bust

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#22 Mar 24, 2012
Prescription abuse bill heads to Senate
Hazard Herald (Ky)
13 days ago | 321 views | 0 | 2 ||
Frankfort - House Speaker Greg Stumbo’s legislation to make it easier to identify and stop prescription drug abuse easily passed the Kentucky House of Representatives today, moving a top priority of his, Governor Beshear’s, Attorney General Jack Conway’s and many others a step closer to becoming law.
“Prescription drug abuse has long been a major problem for Kentucky, but it has gotten significantly worse in recent years,” said Speaker Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg.“What is especially troubling is that most of these drugs are being prescribed right here in the Commonwealth. The one area where we should have the most control is the one area where the ball has been dropped.“House Bill 4 offers a broad range of essential improvements that will allow us to attack the prescription drug epidemic more effectively,” Governor Beshear said.“From enhancements to KASPER to increased scrutiny of pill mills, House Bill 4 will give Kentucky a more muscular response to this scourge.”
“I applaud Kentucky House members for recognizing the importance of enacting sweeping prescription drug legislation during this legislative session,” said Attorney General Jack Conway, whose office would play a much more prominent role if House Bill 4 is enacted.“I am proud to have worked with Speaker Stumbo and Gov. Beshear on this bill to give law enforcement increased access to KASPER data and to keep entrepreneurs out of the pill mill business.”
State Rep. John Tilley, who chairs the House Judiciary Committee and is playing a major role in curbing drug abuse this legislative session, said “House Bill 4 would be a sizeable leap forward in getting prescription drugs out of the hands of those abusing them. It will help us put a stop to one of the key drivers behind the past decade’s prison population growth.”
The hallmark of House Bill 4 is moving the state’s nationally recognized KASPER program - which stands for Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting - from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to the Attorney General’s office. The Attorney General’s Office, the Kentucky State Police and the state’s medical licensure boards would be called upon to work closely together, sharing information related to suspected prescription abuse.
Commonwealth’s Attorneys and County Attorneys would be added to the list of law enforcement officials that could also access KASPER. Medicaid will monitor both prescribers and those enrolled in the Medicaid program, watching for prescription abuse.
Under the bill, all physicians and pharmacists would be required to register with KASPER. According to the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, less than a third of prescribers and less than a fourth of pharmacists had accounts as of 2010. Once registered, prescribers will be required to run KASPER reports on all new patients and periodic checks on those they already see.
To help stop the proliferation of pain clinics, Speaker Stumbo’s legislation would require these businesses to be owned by a licensed physician or an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse. Prescribers charged with abusing their prescription privileges would be barred from prescribing medicine, and those found guilty - either here or in another state - would see their prescription privileges stripped.
Speaker Stumbo’s legislation also limits Schedule II and III drugs to 30 day supplies, though prescriptions for these drugs - including such things as OxyContin - could still, in some cases, be written for 90 days.
“Prescription drug abuse has destroyed so many of our families, so the need to stop this as quickly as possible is an absolute necessity,” Speaker Stumbo said.“I stand ready to work with the Senate, Governor Beshear and Attorney General Conway to continue to develop a comprehensive plan that will enable us to achieve this goal.”

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