EBID asks governor for water

EBID asks governor for water

There are 10 comments on the Alamogordo Daily News story from Jul 3, 2011, titled EBID asks governor for water. In it, Alamogordo Daily News reports that:

LAS CRUCES Do a Ana County farmers are making an urgent plea to Gov. Susana Martinez for water that would lengthen what's set to be the shortest irrigation season on record.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Alamogordo Daily News.

“ keep the loonies on the path.”

Since: Aug 10

Detroit

#1 Jul 3, 2011
This whole idea of giving Mexico water is wrong. They need to come here and round up all their deserters, clean up their own act, and then PAY if we could agree on a price. For now, close the tap.

Since: Sep 08

Location hidden

#2 Apr 22, 2013
The North American Water and Power Alliance (NAWPA or NAWAPA, also referred to as NAWAPTA from proposed governing body the North American Water and Power Treaty Authority) was conceived in the 1950s by the US Army Corps of Engineers as a 'Great Project' to develop more water sources for the United States. The planners envisioned diverting water from some rivers in Alaska south through Canada via the Rocky Mountain Trench and other routes to the US and would involve 369 separate construction projects. The water would enter the US in northern Montana. There it would be diverted to the headwaters of rivers like the Colorado River and others. The water would generate hydro-electricity during its trip via dams. The water supply would double the total amount of fresh water available to lower 48 states with its major focus being on the western states. This would solve the water shortage problems of the west for the foreseeable future. The amount of water available would in fact be so great that some water would be left over for use by Mexico via the Colorado River (which is currently significantly depleted as it enters Mexico).
rio seco

Birmingham, MI

#3 Apr 23, 2013
Nice coverage about how the rio grande is sold off before ever making it to Las Cruces, never mind el paso. This story if from the British Broadcasting Corporation. The BBC. The local news won't educate the public on reality.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-221...
Ex- El Paso Resident

Las Cruces, NM

#4 Apr 23, 2013
rio seco wrote:
Nice coverage about how the rio grande is sold off before ever making it to Las Cruces, never mind el paso. This story if from the British Broadcasting Corporation. The BBC. The local news won't educate the public on reality.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-221...
The operating agreement between the the Feds, EBID and EPIWD #1 that covers project water in the lower Rio Grande took 20 years to work out and get signed. It allows EPIWD #1 to "bank" water in the lake (keep water they did not use this year (allotment) for next year less the evaporation) and New Mexico Farmers to pump ground water to save them in times of drought.

It only took the New Mexico AG a few minutes to destroy all of that work and put New Mexico at risk of loosing water rights to Texas.

He clearly did not discuss his plans with EBID or get their input (the stake holders/owners of the New Mexico water) or educate himself on the compact and associated agreements before going forward on this.

If New Mexico had not filed suit against Texas then Texas would have not filed suit against New Mexico.

If Texas prevails (or even if they do not) the New Mexico voters need to remember this disservice to New Mexico the next time this individual runs for office.

Doug

Alamogordo, NM

#5 Apr 23, 2013
Too many people live in the desert that do not respect the desert ways, trying to grow crops beyond a family needs is wasteful.

Government is not the answer that will resolve this issue. I see many long years in courts with no winner but the lawyers pocket books.

Water issue in the Southwest are going to get worse before they get better.

With abundant solar energy, and plenty of blackish water underground, I would plan on many solar powered water reclaiming plants using reverse Osmosis to serve commmunities and build up water reservoirs.

Locks on navigatable water ways could be used to harvest water from these areas instead of going to sea, again solar powerered can be used to supply some needed power to transfer water overland to drier areas, If California can do it, so can the nation.
TDK

Alamogordo, NM

#6 Apr 23, 2013
Doug wrote:
Too many people live in the desert that do not respect the desert ways, trying to grow crops beyond a family needs is wasteful.
Government is not the answer that will resolve this issue. I see many long years in courts with no winner but the lawyers pocket books.
Water issue in the Southwest are going to get worse before they get better.
With abundant solar energy, and plenty of blackish water underground, I would plan on many solar powered water reclaiming plants using reverse Osmosis to serve commmunities and build up water reservoirs.
Locks on navigatable water ways could be used to harvest water from these areas instead of going to sea, again solar powerered can be used to supply some needed power to transfer water overland to drier areas, If California can do it, so can the nation.
You always state the obvious dear! Now turn off your computer you are wasting electricity..
Doug

Alamogordo, NM

#7 Apr 23, 2013
TDK wrote:
<quoted text>You always state the obvious dear! Now turn off your computer you are wasting electricity..
I am sorry, i should not be so obvious, I should be the typical Topix user.
You mean

Alamogordo, NM

#8 Apr 24, 2013
Doug wrote:
<quoted text>
I am sorry, i should not be so obvious, I should be the typical Topix user.
Like Heisenberg, Barb and Gorky!
rio seco

Birmingham, MI

#9 Apr 24, 2013
Doug wrote:
Too many people live in the desert that do not respect the desert ways, trying to grow crops beyond a family needs is wasteful.
Government is not the answer that will resolve this issue. I see many long years in courts with no winner but the lawyers pocket books.
Water issue in the Southwest are going to get worse before they get better.
With abundant solar energy, and plenty of blackish water underground, I would plan on many solar powered water reclaiming plants using reverse Osmosis to serve commmunities and build up water reservoirs.
Locks on navigatable water ways could be used to harvest water from these areas instead of going to sea, again solar powerered can be used to supply some needed power to transfer water overland to drier areas, If California can do it, so can the nation.
Brackish water is the term for water that requires desalination prior to becoming a potable resource.

The NY Times just covered your points in an article that may be of interest to you. www.nytimes.com/2013/03/01/business/energy-en...

And last year's report from nature.org about the source of California's Water may come as a surprise to you, but it is common knowledge that LA and other southern cities in that state have water piped in from other states(look up MWDSC). Pages 12 and 15
will give you a quick look at where California gets their water and the maps at the end of the report illustrate each source region with the destination.
www.nature.org/media/california/california_dr...

CA is operating in the red but perhaps if they do succeed at filtering sea water for local use, NM can have their old share of the Colorado River to replenish our estuaries.

Win-win vs. Win-lose?
Doug

Alamogordo, NM

#10 Apr 24, 2013
rio seco wrote:
<quoted text>
Brackish water is the term for water that requires desalination prior to becoming a potable resource.
The NY Times just covered your points in an article that may be of interest to you. www.nytimes.com/2013/03/01/business/energy-en...
And last year's report from nature.org about the source of California's Water may come as a surprise to you, but it is common knowledge that LA and other southern cities in that state have water piped in from other states(look up MWDSC). Pages 12 and 15
will give you a quick look at where California gets their water and the maps at the end of the report illustrate each source region with the destination.
www.nature.org/media/california/california_dr...
CA is operating in the red but perhaps if they do succeed at filtering sea water for local use, NM can have their old share of the Colorado River to replenish our estuaries.
Win-win vs. Win-lose?
Thanks, Good Information. With current water laws, i would expect California will never lose the water rights they have gotten by what ever means (legally at times is just short of thievery)including Owens Valley, and if California population increases i would expect more water loss to that state.

We in New Mexico are the ones losing our water rights and we need mucho aqua.

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