Under New Law Towns Forced To Shut Down Websites

For the first time, Salem held a virtual town meeting, where residents could vote in person or watch the meeting from home and vote in real time online. Full Story
Edward Peruta

Meriden, CT

#1 Oct 3, 2008
The requirement to post minutes of meetings on an available website is a great idea and hasn't changed the requirement that minutes of meetings be available in seven days.

Rocky Hill has a very interesting way to meet these requirments and every town in CT should seek the solution by contacting and copying how they record and post their minutes on the web.
Eats shoots and leaves

West Hartford, CT

#2 Oct 3, 2008
Having a website that doesn't provide this information in a timely manner is like giving the public a phone number with an answering machine that no one ever listens to. If you're going to offer information with the new technology - and every town should be doing so - you have to make that information accurate and timely. For most websites, tweaking them to allow someone of ordinary ability (can send and receive emails, save documents on a computer, etc.) to be able to post simple documents and notices should not be a big deal.
JMM

Hartford, CT

#3 Oct 3, 2008
I'm puzzled why the General Assembly felt compelled to legislate this burden onto towns. The minutes of town meetings have been available -- just not necessarily on the 'Net.
Doesn't the legislature have anything better to worry about than whether towns post their minutes online? anything at all? Like those pesky tough issues, like the budget or fuel prices or something?
Psychotic Hamster

Stonington, CT

#4 Oct 3, 2008
Why don't small towns get together and hire one person to work on multiple town web sites?
Mr Common Sense

United States

#5 Oct 3, 2008
Towns have to put up notices of public meetings with at least 24 hours notice. I'm no expert, but can't they just save that notice as a word document, and quickly set up a link to their website to open that document?
Mr Common Sense

United States

#6 Oct 3, 2008
Psychotic Hamster wrote:
Why don't small towns get together and hire one person to work on multiple town web sites?
Good suggestion, but then if they did a lot of towns they might mix up a meeting, then someone would file an FOIA complaint.

“In Dodd we cannot trust.”

Since: Nov 07

Rural Connecticut

#7 Oct 3, 2008
"But for small towns like Salem, with small staff and small budgets, the new law means one thing: an end to their websites or noncompliance."

That's two things.

Not only has the content of the "new and improved" Courant been reduced, so has the quality. But the subscription price has stayed steady.
the Badger

United States

#8 Oct 3, 2008
East Haddam will not be closing their web site. This Town will comply with the new regulations.
Uriah Heep

Waterbury, CT

#9 Oct 3, 2008
JMM wrote:
I'm puzzled why the General Assembly felt compelled to legislate this burden onto towns. The minutes of town meetings have been available -- just not necessarily on the 'Net.
Doesn't the legislature have anything better to worry about than whether towns post their minutes online? anything at all? Like those pesky tough issues, like the budget or fuel prices or something?
I suspect that this legislation was the brain child of the media, one of the chief beneficiaries of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). It is much easier and less costly to click on a website than to send a reporter to town hall.
Bill Generous

Freeport, ME

#10 Oct 4, 2008
Uriah Heep wrote:
<quoted text>
I suspect that this legislation was the brain child of the media, one of the chief beneficiaries of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). It is much easier and less costly to click on a website than to send a reporter to town hall.
There is cost savings for many (maybe not the towns initially) and not just the media which is why the intent of the law is good. Having this and other information available on town websites has saved me a lot of time and it can be had without the filter of the media.

Since: Jul 08

Portland

#11 Oct 4, 2008
Edward Peruta wrote:
The requirement to post minutes of meetings on an available website is a great idea and hasn't changed the requirement that minutes of meetings be available in seven days.
Rocky Hill has a very interesting way to meet these requirments and every town in CT should seek the solution by contacting and copying how they record and post their minutes on the web.
exactly...the posting of a few word or .pdf documents its a minor task since the document is created anyway
Yankee Lover

Granby, CT

#12 Oct 5, 2008
The State of Connecticut should comply with it's mandate by supporting a standard website for each town in the state. Each town would designate who should be trained to post to the site.
And be trained by the state. That's freedom of information, supported and implemented.
DJH

United States

#13 Oct 6, 2008
The towns' whining about this would be funny, if their complaint weren't so pathetic and immature.

It does NOT take a dedicated worker to upload files to a Web site. Uploading to the Web, now, is no more or less difficult than saving a computer file anywhere else, such as a hard drive or network volume. Since they already have people doing the job of generating agendas and typing minutes -- which presumably they're already saving as computer files -- all these people need to do is take an extra 10 seconds to save it to a Web server.

It really is just that simple.

In the long run, the occasional expenditure of an extra tens seconds' time might even save these folks some work, since people won't have to ask them for documents, they can get them via Web-based "self-service." Moreover, the Web site itself acts as a kind of backup, which is never a bad thing.

These towns and their employees need to GROW UP and do the jobs they were elected and/or are paid to do, instead of falling back on the juvenile tactic of shutting down their Web sites to get out of this requirement. It's as childish as a kid taking his ball and going home 'cause he doesn't like the game.
DJH

United States

#14 Oct 6, 2008
Mr Common Sense wrote:
Towns have to put up notices of public meetings with at least 24 hours notice. I'm no expert, but can't they just save that notice as a word document, and quickly set up a link to their website to open that document?
In a way, the answer to this question is "yes." They'd have to upload the file to a Web server. That's pretty much all they'd need to do.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Harwinton Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
horny chat (Apr '10) Dec 23 hikgugig 18
Attempted Robbery, Larceny, Drug Conspiracy - F... Dec 15 Johnny Z 2
Parents fear for missing daughter, 17 (Oct '07) Nov '14 MXeditor 145
Torrington parents demand action on race relations (Mar '10) Nov '14 Suzie 6
Debate: Trayvon Martin - Torrington, CT (Mar '12) Nov '14 Paul 2
Eddie DuBois Oct '14 A Friend 1
Police seize large amounts of marijuana, cash h... (Feb '11) Sep '13 American Gentlema... 38
Harwinton Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Harwinton People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Harwinton News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Harwinton

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 3:35 pm PST