Hartford Hospital On Probation

There are 20 comments on the Hartford Courant story from Feb 9, 2008, titled Hartford Hospital On Probation. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

Citing multiple lapses in patient care - including four cases in which patients died - the state health department placed Hartford Hospital on probation Friday, demanding sweeping changes in the way the 800-bed ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hartford Courant.

Don is going to be the 1

Greenfield, MA

#108 Feb 9, 2008
I have been in HH plenty of times for few surveys in my MBA program lately, regarding with medical field. The first impression was that management is out of their mind. Who placed those people there? What is their education? What management skills do they use in their everyday job? What is their strategy and how well are their decisions fits to their vision and their mission? I heard so many unhappy cases, and I am so ready to jump as an eyewitness if needed in the court. This is ridiculous when you think that these people in the management staff are using their authority to direct their staff in the wrong way. How can they play with the people who trust their life in that institution? I heard it clear and sound that a dirty game is going on from the management. I have a long list with all the issues and poor quality, and all this is because management can not use the tools necessary to commend the situation. No study is being done from the management on the issues inside the hospital. What is the Cp and Cpk of this hospital? By the way, you need to have statistical knowledge to understand the above terms. Do you think we should call the Japanese to apply the kaizen knowledge to this place? As we say, fish stink from the head. If HH will be in the court one day, I will stay behind the asses of the stupid management, and desecrate them in the front of all the American people, all around the world. I urge the president of HH to take the correct actions and change the course of hospital, hire right away a consultant and fire right away the stupid managers who cause all these trouble. They have to detach from all the bad elements first and have a criteria on the new hires. I am following very close this case, I have names, documented cases, ready for the court, and if it would be necessary, all those will be open in the public, and then it is going to be bad. Letís see how far is this going, I am watching you HH managers, very closely and if John Meehan is not taking the right actions, than I will stand up under the name of the American people, and raise my voice. Hopefully, you who will read this article will hear it and justice will take place one day.
Don
Sue

Meriden, CT

#109 Feb 9, 2008
I worked there as a nurse's aide for a few years and I saw first hand the good and the bad. The staff is a little to willing to whip out wirst restraints and posey vests on patients who are demented or confused, however what choice do they have when you have 2-3 nurses aides per 30 patients. You have many nurses aides who work there under the tile of PCA or Patient Care Associate and yet many of them have not been certified by the state as CNA's. These same PCA's are the one who are expected to perform phlebotomy, wash and feed patients, perform EKG's among numerous other tasks. Some work hard but some are only working there because they know someone who pulled strings to get them in. Some of these girls dont know the basics of infection control and have no business dealing with people who are accutely ill.
Mary

Greenville, GA

#110 Feb 9, 2008
test
Mary

Greenville, GA

#111 Feb 9, 2008
They should look into Charlotte Hungerford Hospital also. I know people who died at the hands of doctors there and people who came close to death there, as I was one of those patients who will never go there again.
my sentiments exactly

Wallingford, CT

#112 Feb 9, 2008
Disgusted in Healthcare wrote:
. Staffing ratios are terrible! Why anyone would actually want to be a nurse these days is beyond me! Why go to school for a stressful, very underpaid, and unappreciated profession when you can go to school for business, engineering, etc. and make a lot more money when you get out? I have been a nurse for years, and I can tell you, I hate it now. I used to love it. If I had to do it all over again, there is no way I would ever want to be a nurse. I have worked at several hospitals in CT, and I can tell you, I thought Hartford was an exceptional facility, much better than many others. I also spent time at other major hospitals in CT, and every single one of them had cases that they wish never happened.

Even the best hospitals have some skeletons in their closests that they would like to get rid of.
As for the executives, they may not get the same compensation as an executive at a for profit company, but they are way overpaid compared to all of those working under them providing direct patient care. Hospitals would be better suited recruiting and paying for top medical, nursing, and other direct patient care professionals.
My sentiments exactly!
I need to find a new line of work.
a nurse

Middle Haddam, CT

#113 Feb 10, 2008
Finger Pointing wrote:
I work in EMS and I go into almost every hospital in Hartford County on a daily basis. For the most part they all have their share of problems. The problems with Hartford and St Fran are that theyre trying to juggle big ticket cases like strokes and heart attacks and trauma that bring in the money against the homeless and uninsured that are using the Emergency Room as a hotel and a free clinic. There are 2 basic solutions. First, start turning people away at the door. People will get the message pretty quick when theyre told if they dont have an emergency then they need to go somewhere else. Second, open up the express treatment area 24/7. That way when you kick em out, they can walk one door over and get seen and the hospital doesnt have to feel bad for turning people away. Third, the staffing is horrendous. There are not nearly enough nurses. Despite this, the hospitals (not just Hartford) refuse to hire skilled workers like Paramedics, who are greater in number and cheaper to employ. On a patient ward, you need a nurse, because long term care is what they do. In an Emergency Room, a Paramedic or EMT can do everything necessary to care for the patient. The redistribution of staff is the single biggest detractor from proper patient care. There arent enough nurses to go around, therefore they get swamped, burned out and lose focus, and thats when things like unattended death occur. Medicaid needs to start paying its bills. To pay half of a bill and then say youre not gonna pay the rest would be illegal for any private citizen and therefore the state should be held to the same account. So to summarize, Hartford Hospital has its share of problems, but so does everyone else. Lets not go pointing fingers when the issue is systemic in healthcare as a whole. Besides, those people that died probably had it coming anyway. Thats what happens in hospitals. People die. Imagine that...
I agree with your opinion right up until you think the people who died had it coming!! Im sure the unborn child who died while its mother was in labor didnt have it coming!!!
Get Real

Granby, CT

#114 Feb 10, 2008
Sue wrote:
I worked there as a nurse's aide for a few years and I saw first hand the good and the bad. The staff is a little to willing to whip out wirst restraints and posey vests on patients who are demented or confused, however what choice do they have when you have 2-3 nurses aides per 30 patients. You have many nurses aides who work there under the tile of PCA or Patient Care Associate and yet many of them have not been certified by the state as CNA's. These same PCA's are the one who are expected to perform phlebotomy, wash and feed patients, perform EKG's among numerous other tasks.

Some of these girls dont know the basics of infection control and have no business dealing with people who are accutely ill.
Exactly! And the last line...hence C-dif, MRSA and on and on.
Fed Up 3

United States

#115 Feb 10, 2008
Nikki wrote:
This hospital may at one time been wonderful ...but it is not any longer...When my daughter was brought to HH ER after having a near nervous breakdown after her apartment burnt down and she almost lost her life...she was suicidal..the doc let her sit in the ER with NO treatment for over 8 hours...right before she was going to be discharged around midnight she called someone from the hotel Red Cross set up for the victims to come pick her up.. While making the call to her friend the nurse unplugged the patient telephone as the doc demanded she hang up... up...when she did the reciever accidently hit the doc's hand...and he complained that she bruised him...Even though she apologized several times - and was sobbing he had the Hartford police handcuff and arrested on a felony charge. The Hartford police were also very crude in their treatment of her as well and demanded she stop sobbing.
It's good to know that the state of CT is investigating this hospital.because the staff in the ER obviously are abusive to their psychiatric patients. I contacted this hospital and complained just a couple weeks ago...and will be filing a full complaint to the state of CT as well as seeking an attorney for mal practice...I will also be contacting the Hartford police chief and asking for an internal investigation into the treatment and charges against my daughter. Psychiatric patients should not be abused by doctors or the police...They are supposed to be there to help people not hurt them.
Good luck finding a lawyer, lady. Rudeness isn't malpractice. Your daughter didn't go out and kill herself, did she?
jen

Glastonbury, CT

#116 Feb 10, 2008
Finger Pointing wrote:
Middletown Joe,
I see your point, and you have a valid opinion. However, I disagree on the issue of having providers who are not nurses working in the hospitals. If you take the curriculum of a Paramedic program, you'll find that we actually perform MORE than they do. Take a 4 year nursing program. The actual medical education is about 3 full semesters. The rest is drinking games and basket weaving. Paramedic school is 3 full semesters of much more invasive education (colleagues who have firsthand knowledge from attending both courses have described it as taking PA school, cramming it into a year, and removing certain aspects of it). The obvious finger to point here is that the nursing lobby is the most influential labor group in all of health care. Soup to nuts, nurses have more in numbers than any other group of providers. Of course JHCAO doesnt want Medics in the hospitals. That would take away nursing jobs. It doesnt matter how practical it would be. Its all political in that regard. I am by no means arguing that a medic could replace a nurse in an OR or in a Med/Surg floor, but I promise you, when it comes to Emergency Medicine, whether it be medical or trauma, the industry as a whole would be well served to hire a few good Paramedics. I also promise you, in cities that have already implemented what I have just described, they do not have these problems.
I'm sorry, but I am a nursing student at a 4 year university and I DO NOT spend my free time playing drinking games and basket weaving. To say that we don't have the same intense curriculum as a paramedic is absolutely ridiculous. I take classes that are 7 and 8 credits each. my time out of class is spent reading, writing multiple page care plans, and working to be able to pay for nursing school. I take great offense to people like you who think they can replace an RN who had to jump through so many hoops to get where they are. Do you even get the critical thinking skills and the assessment skills as an EMT? Do you even understand the theory and rationales behind nursing care? Maybe, maybe not. Stay where you do your job best - out in the field.
been there

AOL

#117 Feb 10, 2008
I went to the HH ER a couple of times. This was when I was uneducated about levels of care. Let me explain:
I am considered disabled. When one of my ailments flaired (bleeding where their should be no blood) I went in. They ran tests. I was given an IV. The IV didn't work.(I never got the fluid) After 2 hours on the table, the needle was taken out of my arm and I was told to go home, and to " come back should anything arise".
I went to another hospital and was admitted. When I told them about what happen, they looked amaised.

I come to the conclusion that it is what type of insurance you have that dictates the care you get. The better the insurance, the better the care.
been there

AOL

#118 Feb 10, 2008
As for the tale of woe spun about medicare, medicaid not paying enough, I have talked to actual nurses from this hospital that have admitted to me that if a medicare/medicaid patient comes in, they are to do whatever they can to just stablize that person, then get them out quickly.If the person has better insurance, they can take more time with them.
TRUTH

Auburn Hills, MI

#119 Feb 10, 2008
Hartford Hospital is a great place...if you're looking for somewhere to die.

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#120 Feb 10, 2008
been there wrote:
As for the tale of woe spun about medicare, medicaid not paying enough, I have talked to actual nurses from this hospital that have admitted to me that if a medicare/medicaid patient comes in, they are to do whatever they can to just stablize that person, then get them out quickly.If the person has better insurance, they can take more time with them.
You need to elaborate a bit more here. You see Medicare allow X amount of days for each illness/admission, they allow a certain amount of money for each item or procedure. If the hospital chooses to keep a patient beyond the time allowed, the hospital has to eat that money. Medicare gives the hospital X amount of dollars for a procedure, a medication whatever. Again, if you do have private insurance they will be reimbursed on a different, and usually, a much more equitable level.

Now bearing in mind that 99% of the hospital in CT are not for profit. They have to make up the losses somewhere.

Do they discharge patients out of the hospital too soon? Times have changed, it was not long ago when childbirth bought you a week in the hospital, when you got admitted to the hospital and your time in pre-operative care was counted in days, now in hours. Home care has replaced inpatient care. Convalescent hospitals now are expected to do the majority of any recuperative care. The times they are a changing, for the good or not.

So either these hospitals dance and change with the times or they can go under. Is it fair? Is it right? Does it even matter anymore?
Finger Pointing

Vernon Rockville, CT

#121 Feb 10, 2008
So of course all the nurses get offended when they hear that theyre not perfect. Nothing I said in my last post was really up for debate. It wasnt even really that opinionated either. My argument is this: If a Paramedic can do things in an ambulance that nurses arent allowed to do in the ER, then why shouldnt we do them in the ER? The medics that work in the ERs are mostly limited because nurses cant handle the fact that we have more autonomy than they do. Think of it this way: A nurse is never alone, and they never touch the patient without direct physician orders. For the nursing students out there: We need you. Keep it up and graduate and get into the business. But dont for one second think that youre the only game in town, or that the RN after your name somehow makes you superior. Paramedics treat a myriad of medical and traumatic problems every day and there is very little that we must ask permission for. Do the nurses out there honestly believe that we would get to that level without an intensely rigorous training regimen? And for any nurse that thinks they are of a higher level of care than a medic, come out and ride with us and the awakening shall begin. Youll note in my first post in this topic that I never said anyone was better than the other. But in a time of shortage, like we have now, the nurses could be re-distributed to alleviate the problems that are arising.

Since: Jun 07

Avon, CT

#122 Feb 10, 2008
Hartford Hospital radiologists blatantly falsified my MRI scan reports.

I reported this to the DPH in 2004 or 2005. I brought them the scans, and the reports and there was a very obvious disparity. The investigator who took the scans from me said "this is criminal" but apparently the radiologist that the scans were sent to said that the HH radiologists did nothing beneath the standard of care. I was not allowed to see a copy of the investigative report, even when I requested it under the FOI Act.

It would help if they would hire some radiologists who can actually SEE.

HH makes me sick.
Silly me

Hamden, CT

#123 Feb 10, 2008
Middletown Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
You need to elaborate a bit more here. You see Medicare allow X amount of days for each illness/admission, they allow a certain amount of money for each item or procedure. If the hospital chooses to keep a patient beyond the time allowed, the hospital has to eat that money. Medicare gives the hospital X amount of dollars for a procedure, a medication whatever. Again, if you do have private insurance they will be reimbursed on a different, and usually, a much more equitable level.
Now bearing in mind that 99% of the hospital in CT are not for profit. They have to make up the losses somewhere.
Do they discharge patients out of the hospital too soon? Times have changed, it was not long ago when childbirth bought you a week in the hospital, when you got admitted to the hospital and your time in pre-operative care was counted in days, now in hours. Home care has replaced inpatient care. Convalescent hospitals now are expected to do the majority of any recuperative care. The times they are a changing, for the good or not.
So either these hospitals dance and change with the times or they can go under. Is it fair? Is it right? Does it even matter anymore?
The financial reimbursement system is broken. Medicare/Medicaid rates are negotiated with each hospital, and are typically below a dollar for a dollar's worth of care provided.

The only way to make up for this is to negotiate higher reimbursement rates with the private insurers. So, for example, if a hospital gets reimbursed 80 cents for every dollar it spends on a Medicaid/Medicare patient, it needs to have an equivalent number of private pay patients at a rate of $1.20 just to break even.

BTW, the one for-profit hospital in CT is Sharon Hospital. All others are non-profit.
been there

AOL

#124 Feb 10, 2008
Middletown Joe:

I am not sure exactly how you would like me to elaborate. Aske me some questions, and I will be happy to answer
Butcher Shops

AOL

#125 Feb 10, 2008
Dana Herbert wrote:
Hartford Hospital radiologists blatantly falsified my MRI scan reports.
I reported this to the DPH in 2004 or 2005. I brought them the scans, and the reports and there was a very obvious disparity. The investigator who took the scans from me said "this is criminal" but apparently the radiologist that the scans were sent to said that the HH radiologists did nothing beneath the standard of care. I was not allowed to see a copy of the investigative report, even when I requested it under the FOI Act.
It would help if they would hire some radiologists who can actually SEE.
HH makes me sick.
Wonder if you should have contacted an attorney? Sounds like one big cover up? Hartford Hospital should be ashamed of themselves. I'm imagining if you have a lot of money, the standard of care is at a different level?

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#126 Feb 10, 2008
been there wrote:
Middletown Joe:
I am not sure exactly how you would like me to elaborate. Aske me some questions, and I will be happy to answer
What I was saying was there is more to the story than what you said. I just added the missing parts that made your statements more clear. It isn't as clear cut as you said.

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#127 Feb 10, 2008
Finger Pointing wrote:
So of course all the nurses get offended when they hear that theyre not perfect. Nothing I said in my last post was really up for debate. It wasnt even really that opinionated either. My argument is this: If a Paramedic can do things in an ambulance that nurses arent allowed to do in the ER, then why shouldnt we do them in the ER? The medics that work in the ERs are mostly limited because nurses cant handle the fact that we have more autonomy than they do. Think of it this way: A nurse is never alone, and they never touch the patient without direct physician orders. For the nursing students out there: We need you. Keep it up and graduate and get into the business. But dont for one second think that youre the only game in town, or that the RN after your name somehow makes you superior. Paramedics treat a myriad of medical and traumatic problems every day and there is very little that we must ask permission for. Do the nurses out there honestly believe that we would get to that level without an intensely rigorous training regimen? And for any nurse that thinks they are of a higher level of care than a medic, come out and ride with us and the awakening shall begin. Youll note in my first post in this topic that I never said anyone was better than the other. But in a time of shortage, like we have now, the nurses could be re-distributed to alleviate the problems that are arising.
For the same reason that a medic in the armed forces can do so much more than any other para professional. It's the armed services, once they get out they are again governed by the same laws that apply to ALL heathcare professionals. The bottom line is you can debate all you want. If you want to do a nurses job, go back to school and get your nursing license. If you are happy with what you are doing, that's great.

As I said, I have many friends in prehospital as well as RNs PAs and MDs and a few APRNs. Paramedics are governed and their treatments are dictated by MDs. The emergency medical attention you give is set out in algorithms that leave no leeway for deviation. This leaves little to nothing left for any independent decision making, because you again, and most importantly, lack the theory or education that an RN or APRN would possess. Any deviation from the normal steps set out in an algorithm will warrant a call to medical control, no decision making there.

As far as your argument regarding why you can't do the same things in a hospital as you do prehospital, AGAIN, I believe the health field and the EMS field are governed by people far more intelligent than you or me. They have stated RNs will do Nursing, and EMT-A,D,I&Ps will do prehospital care. I think they call them rules and regulations. Again, gleaning from the words of my friends if you don't like what you are doing, get your butt back to school or try and change the laws. Good Luck, and you too keep up the good job you do in your prehospital care. We need you out there.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Hartford Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 5 min red and right 1,224,529
News Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds ... (Dec '08) 2 hr Patriot AKA Bozo 53,054
News Israeli troops begin Gaza pullout as Hamas decl... (Jan '09) 2 hr TRD 69,824
Amazing Child educational DIY materials kit 21 hr Vinvin 1
News The 25 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S. Are Mo... (Nov '10) Mon Chuck 19,892
News Thousands Protest Roe V. Wade Decision (Jan '08) Mon Pearl Jam 309,755
justin c. freeman attorney hartford, ct is a sh... May 3 weatherfieldguy112 1
More from around the web

Hartford People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]