Build Your Emergency Food Supply in S...

Build Your Emergency Food Supply in Six Months

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“Use Your Prepper Sense”

Since: Sep 09

In Your Head

#1 Jan 30, 2013
Survivalists/Preppers and grandparents tend to measure wealth differently than the Gameboy generation. If you’re the kind of person who’s concerned about emergency preparation, a large emergency food supply is true wealth. Just imagine a hurricane, flood, or earthquake that disrupts the infrastructure for several weeks. While the sheeple panic because the grocery store shelves are bare, you’re sitting pretty on a year’s supply of food. How does it feel? Why, it feels like opulence and abundance — wealth.

It’s Never Too Late To Build Up Food Stocks

We’re addressing a situation in which you’re basically hunkered down at your home, or else you’ve reached your bugout location. A foundational element of any emergency preparedness plan is the food stock. OK, your neighbor has a four-year stock, but it’s never too late for you to start. In fact, you probably have a three-day supply in your pantry, but we’ll get to that.

Food Stock Selection Principles

Before you build up your food stock, a few tips to keep in mind:

•Make sure your selections are shelf stable. Canned and dry goods are best. In case of power outage, the freezer will keep your food for only two or three days. Don’t turn your nose up at processed foods; they tend to store longer, and while processed food is not as good for you as whole foods, it’s better than starving.
•Stock food you will want to eat.
•Stock dry and canned goods in a cool, dry, dark environment. Darkness is especially important if any of your canning is done in glass jars, because the light breaks down vitamins and protein in the food.
•Variety is important. It prevents monotony and balances your diet.
•Don’t shun convenience. Particularly for the short-term stocks (three days to two weeks), it’ll lift a great burden off your shoulders if you can just open a can and heat your meal, or eat something that’s good cold.
•Small containers have a higher unit cost, but prevent waste (which is in itself costly).
•Don’t make it too complicated. You certainly can go deep and calculate precise calorie and nutritional requirements, but if uncertainty is stopping you from getting something in the cupboard, then just simplify. Use an ancient, tried-and-true method — trial and error. We’ll come back to this.

Build Your Emergency Food Stock in Six Months

Building up a year-long food supply is a big endeavor, but you can do it by tackling this in three steps:

•Week 1, build up a three-day supply
•Week 2, build up a one-month supply
•During the next five months, build up your one-year supply

Week 1 (right now!)— Get your three day supply. Most power outages are short, and a three day supply of dry and canned goods will get you through most thunderstorm-induced blackouts. First, check your pantry. You might well have a supply that will get your through three days without power or transportation. If not, a single trip to the grocery store can get you up and running. Here’s a suggested 3-day list (per person):

•Can opener!
•Trail mix – 8-ounce serving
•Crackers – 1 box (8-ounces or larger)
•Peanut butter – 1 (12-ounce) jar
•Canned juice – 1 6-pack of 6-ounce containers
•Peaches – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Fruit cocktail – 2 (8-ounce) cans
•Beans – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Corn – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Tuna – 1 (3 1/4-ounce) can
•Beef stew or Chili – 2 small cans
•Tomato or other soup – 1 can
•Raisins or dried prunes – 2 12-ounce package
•Mixed nuts – 1 package or jar
•Tea and coffee – 1 box with 16 bags or 1 (2-ounce) jar instant coffee
•Water – 1 gallon



“Use Your Prepper Sense”

Since: Sep 09

In Your Head

#2 Jan 30, 2013
Of course, if you have more than one person to stock for, combine quantities in larger containers to save on the unit cost. That is, buy a big jar of peanut butter instead of several small ones. Caveat: small quantities can still be useful, like small drink servings. You don’t waste as much. Also, there is a convenience factor here — you’re looking for a quick and easy way to get an emergency stock. Save the heavy calculations for your long-term survival stock.

A variety of canned fish is a great food stock.

Dry goods such as whole wheat, steel cut oats, beans, and rice. I freeze them for two weeks to kill parasites before sealing in plastic buckets.

Week 2 — Build up your one-month supply. There are too many differences from one household to the next to make a precise grocery list. But don’t worry, figuring what you need is fairly straightforward. Just see how much food you need to prepare a meal for your entire family, and multiply that by three to cover three meals a day.(If your family eats out at all during the month, this is more accurate than multiplying your weekly grocery-shopping by four). Then add 20% to cover errors.

Remember, it’s possible to get extremely precise about how many calories and what kind of foods you need, and by all means do so if you like. But if you don’t go to all this trouble, you still need something to eat, right? Here are some suggestions — add your own, of course:

•Pasta. Spaghetti, macaroni, whatever. Great source of carbs, and everybody loves it. It’s not huge on vitamins, but that’s what canned fruit is for.
•Canned fish. Salmon, jack mackerel, sardines, tuna, kippered herring. All these make great survival foods. Rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and flavor.
•Dried beans and rice. Yes, there are lots of Y2K jokes about this, and I bet some of you still have some, eleven years later. But if you store them properly they will keep literally for decades. One interesting thing about beans and rice — together they make a “complete protein.” Rice has some of the amino acids that make up protein, and beans have the rest of them. Together, it’s great food.
•Basic canned produce. Get a variety of beans (black, pinto, navy, kidney, and lima), vegetables (tomato, corn, and your favorite greens), and fruit (peaches, pears, apple sauce, or just a cocktail). These few items will cover nearly the entire gamut of vitamins, minerals, and fiber you’ll need long term, all while providing all the variety you’ll need to maintain morale.
•Special canned produce. For an occasional treat, keep a few cans of blueberries, pumpkin pie filling, hearts of palm, capers, olives, or whatever your favorite canned goods might be.
•Staples. Olive oil, flour, sugar, and salt. Buy them in bulk at Sam’s Club or Costco. Keep flour safe from mice and moths.

A long-term supply should go beyond basic survival -- a balanced diet and occasional treats are good for health and morale.

Month 2 through 6 — Build up your one-year supply. Now that you have a one-month supply, buy another two-month supply for each of the next four months, and a three-month supply the last month. When all is said and done, you’ll have everything you need to keep your family fed for a year.

“Use Your Prepper Sense”

Since: Sep 09

In Your Head

#3 Jan 30, 2013
Try to keep in mind here that when I talk about prepping/survival, I am trying to help you in some way.

I'm new to this prepping, but I feel we all, as a country, need to do this for the good of all, or all that you love.

This is not about acting weird, crazy, or fighting over politics, or religion like we do on Topix acting like idiots. This is about protecting yourself, and your family from civil unrest, a natural disaster, or any serious threat that may happen or come our way.

Just keep in mind, you, and you alone are your first line of defense.

Can't we put our differences aside for a few minutes and learn from each other?

It could be the difference in saving your life, or death.
thats

Hyden, KY

#4 Jan 30, 2013
some good things jimmy if nothing ever happens these are things that can be used in ever day life.just make things more sure and have peace of mind.here another little small helpful hint for light when their nothing but the forest to choose from .find a old rotted up pine tree get the knots out it they are nothing but a big wad of pine tar .they will burn for hours as a torch light or use about three to cook a good meal with.the tar can be used as glue to for many things.they are good for row hide for a long bow string.make them last 5 times longer.this is some the old native american ways.and they seat spear heads well.

“Use Your Prepper Sense”

Since: Sep 09

In Your Head

#5 Jan 30, 2013
thats wrote:
some good things jimmy if nothing ever happens these are things that can be used in ever day life.just make things more sure and have peace of mind.here another little small helpful hint for light when their nothing but the forest to choose from .find a old rotted up pine tree get the knots out it they are nothing but a big wad of pine tar .they will burn for hours as a torch light or use about three to cook a good meal with.the tar can be used as glue to for many things.they are good for row hide for a long bow string.make them last 5 times longer.this is some the old native american ways.and they seat spear heads well.
That's great to know. Thanks!!

I burn a lot of Ponderosa Pine in my wood burning fireplace, and when there's knots in the logs, I mean it flames like all get out, and I mean in a hurry.

It's the simple things like that...that can help us all if things get insane. If they don't, then we'll have a lot of food, and knowledge. Should die, it can be passed on to my loved ones who will be stocked up just in case things get real bad.

I'm going to add a compound bow to my prep kit with tons of arrows. I want a crossbow, and a regular 60-80 lb. bow. I'm working on getting various knives for many reasons...protection, skinning, et... Arrows are deadly, and quiet.

I have a wish list that I am working on now. It's a long term project, but I am trying to get the things I need now if I do not have a long time to build all of my food and water supplies.

Thanks for your input.
haa

Hyden, KY

#6 Jan 30, 2013
thats wrote:
some good things jimmy if nothing ever happens these are things that can be used in ever day life.just make things more sure and have peace of mind.here another little small helpful hint for light when their nothing but the forest to choose from .find a old rotted up pine tree get the knots out it they are nothing but a big wad of pine tar .they will burn for hours as a torch light or use about three to cook a good meal with.the tar can be used as glue to for many things.they are good for row hide for a long bow string.make them last 5 times longer.this is some the old native american ways.and they seat spear heads well.
men never think of the really important things. Don't forget plenty of bathroom tissue and those little wipes. Deodorant, soap and toothpaste, diet coke, etc.
hahaha

Hyden, KY

#7 Jan 30, 2013
haa wrote:
<quoted text>
men never think of the really important things. Don't forget plenty of bathroom tissue and those little wipes. Deodorant, soap and toothpaste, diet coke, etc.
that good thinking sw.
haa

Hyden, KY

#8 Jan 30, 2013
hahaha wrote:
<quoted text>that good thinking sw.
Yea, I don't know how I would manage without those little bathroom wipes. I even carry them in my purse. lol.

“"South of Southern”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#9 Jan 31, 2013
Jimmy Rants wrote:
Try to keep in mind here that when I talk about prepping/survival, I am trying to help you in some way.
I'm new to this prepping, but I feel we all, as a country, need to do this for the good of all, or all that you love.
This is not about acting weird, crazy, or fighting over politics, or religion like we do on Topix acting like idiots. This is about protecting yourself, and your family from civil unrest, a natural disaster, or any serious threat that may happen or come our way.
Just keep in mind, you, and you alone are your first line of defense.
Can't we put our differences aside for a few minutes and learn from each other?
It could be the difference in saving your life, or death.
Dang Jim you really are paranoid about all this prepping stuff aint ye?

Shoot I'm glad to know you're spending so much time stockpiling supplies. Cawz if we ever are faced with a doomsday scenario I'll just get some'uve these "Good ole boys" together and then hunt you down and take yours! You gotta have enough stored by now to support a small army for months.
guest

Harlan, KY

#10 Jan 31, 2013
Although I am not a prepper or what ever you call it but I have to say I think jimmy is not wrong about preparing for whatever may happen. heck we can get a winter weather advisory and you can't get through the stores.I always have enough in my cabinets to last several days... when I was growing up we always had the essentials for preparing meals at least up to two weeks,It is something to think about.
You know it but

Corbin, KY

#11 Jan 31, 2013
I always prep. You never know when crap hits the fan. Stock up on everything is my moto. The Dollar Tree is a great place to buy some things.

“Use Your Prepper Sense”

Since: Sep 09

In Your Head

#12 Jan 31, 2013
rawtruth wrote:
<quoted text>
Dang Jim you really are paranoid about all this prepping stuff aint ye?
Shoot I'm glad to know you're spending so much time stockpiling supplies. Cawz if we ever are faced with a doomsday scenario I'll just get some'uve these "Good ole boys" together and then hunt you down and take yours! You gotta have enough stored by now to support a small army for months.
Not months, years.

Our supplies are not in one place. If there is an EMP, you will be walking here since all vehicles will not start, nor run, unless they are cars built before 1980. Nothing electrical will work from digital to transistors. I mean nada. We will be like it was 200 years ago.

Another thing, we have many close trained people involved as a recon/safety/survival/prep support team, and growing for those who want to try, and take what we have in our community. We've been working building a network, with personal, private bug out places to go to should one, or more of our own group turn on us. Actually, they would be shot dead worst case scenario.

I am very serious about prepping. Not prepping for doomsday, but prepping just in case the SHTF.

Those who are ready might live, those who aren't, will certainly die before their natural time was to end.
their

Hyden, KY

#13 Jan 31, 2013
are many things to prep for ,big snow storms wind storms ice storms these can bring a stand still for weeks.look at how long some has been out power and housing on the east coast from the big storms that hit it.wonder if any one was prepped for that?..
John Engle

Baxter, KY

#14 Jan 31, 2013
their wrote:
are many things to prep for ,big snow storms wind storms ice storms these can bring a stand still for weeks.look at how long some has been out power and housing on the east coast from the big storms that hit it.wonder if any one was prepped for that?..
I would say some were but most Weren't. The best thing about prepping is the piece of mind you will have knowing that you have on hand what you need to live when SHTF. That way you can direct your attention to other things.

“"South of Southern”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#15 Feb 1, 2013
Jimmy Rants wrote:
<quoted text>
Not months, years.
Our supplies are not in one place. If there is an EMP, you will be walking here since all vehicles will not start, nor run, unless they are cars built before 1980. Nothing electrical will work from digital to transistors. I mean nada. We will be like it was 200 years ago.
Another thing, we have many close trained people involved as a recon/safety/survival/prep support team, and growing for those who want to try, and take what we have in our community. We've been working building a network, with personal, private bug out places to go to should one, or more of our own group turn on us. Actually, they would be shot dead worst case scenario.
I am very serious about prepping. Not prepping for doomsday, but prepping just in case the SHTF.
Those who are ready might live, those who aren't, will certainly die before their natural time was to end.
Heck I gotta 1977 yellow Gremlin.'Em suckers could survive a direct hit from an ICBM!

I figure all I would need is a nice assortment of weapons, transportation and the address of ANYONE who knows you personally and that possesses inside info on the whereabouts of your stockpiles of supplies. Cawz they aint no doubt that ANYONE who knows you personally would sell you out for few food stamps and a five pound box of government cheese.

“"South of Southern”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#16 Feb 1, 2013
their wrote:
are many things to prep for ,big snow storms wind storms ice storms these can bring a stand still for weeks.look at how long some has been out power and housing on the east coast from the big storms that hit it.wonder if any one was prepped for that?..
Here's a few things my Granny "Prepped" for.(Course she has always been strong believer in the super market tabloids too. And has a habit of feeding cats that aint there.)

Y2k
The new millenium.
Dec 2012
The rapture
Nostradamus's 1999 prophecy
The anti-christ.

Just to name a few.

And since none of those things came to past, she is now scowling the super market tabloids for the next "END OF DAYS" prophecy

Heck man she's got can food stored in her basement that is dated from back in the 40's!

Why dont ya'll search the National Inquirer for the latest "END OF LIFE AS WE KNOW IT" scenarios? After all we all know that they have won multiple awards for ground breaking, unique, highly credible news forecasting.
i bet

Hyden, KY

#17 Feb 1, 2013
granny lives a life where she has not much wary about if shes going have food when things gets bad.and peace of mind that she can feed he family to.what a granny.when they go to RIP we have lost some the best their is in surviving hard times.that wisdom is gone if we don't learn if.

“"South of Southern”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#18 Feb 1, 2013
i bet wrote:
granny lives a life where she has not much wary about if shes going have food when things gets bad.and peace of mind that she can feed he family to.what a granny.when they go to RIP we have lost some the best their is in surviving hard times.that wisdom is gone if we don't learn if.
Well the way I see it is. If I can manage to steer clear of any doomsday scenarios for... oh about 40-50 years I wont need to prep. I'll either be dead, or too old to worry about a doomsday, or so old I would welcome it. And then granny can keep her old stale saltines and out dated soup.

“"South of Southern”

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#19 Feb 1, 2013
You know it but wrote:
I always prep. You never know when crap hits the fan. Stock up on everything is my moto. The Dollar Tree is a great place to buy some things.
O.K... Prepping?

EH ...FINE!

But trusting the future of your survival to products purchased at the "Dollar Tree?" You gotta be kidding me! LMAO.. HA HA HA!

Since: Jul 12

United States

#20 Feb 1, 2013
Jimmy Rants wrote:
Survivalists/Preppers and grandparents tend to measure wealth differently than the Gameboy generation. If you’re the kind of person who’s concerned about emergency preparation, a large emergency food supply is true wealth. Just imagine a hurricane, flood, or earthquake that disrupts the infrastructure for several weeks. While the sheeple panic because the grocery store shelves are bare, you’re sitting pretty on a year’s supply of food. How does it feel? Why, it feels like opulence and abundance — wealth.
It’s Never Too Late To Build Up Food Stocks
We’re addressing a situation in which you’re basically hunkered down at your home, or else you’ve reached your bugout location. A foundational element of any emergency preparedness plan is the food stock. OK, your neighbor has a four-year stock, but it’s never too late for you to start. In fact, you probably have a three-day supply in your pantry, but we’ll get to that.
Food Stock Selection Principles
Before you build up your food stock, a few tips to keep in mind:
•Make sure your selections are shelf stable. Canned and dry goods are best. In case of power outage, the freezer will keep your food for only two or three days. Don’t turn your nose up at processed foods; they tend to store longer, and while processed food is not as good for you as whole foods, it’s better than starving.
•Stock food you will want to eat.
•Stock dry and canned goods in a cool, dry, dark environment. Darkness is especially important if any of your canning is done in glass jars, because the light breaks down vitamins and protein in the food.
•Variety is important. It prevents monotony and balances your diet.
•Don’t shun convenience. Particularly for the short-term stocks (three days to two weeks), it’ll lift a great burden off your shoulders if you can just open a can and heat your meal, or eat something that’s good cold.
•Small containers have a higher unit cost, but prevent waste (which is in itself costly).
•Don’t make it too complicated. You certainly can go deep and calculate precise calorie and nutritional requirements, but if uncertainty is stopping you from getting something in the cupboard, then just simplify. Use an ancient, tried-and-true method — trial and error. We’ll come back to this.
Build Your Emergency Food Stock in Six Months
Building up a year-long food supply is a big endeavor, but you can do it by tackling this in three steps:
•Week 1, build up a three-day supply
•Week 2, build up a one-month supply
•During the next five months, build up your one-year supply
Week 1 (right now!)— Get your three day supply. Most power outages are short, and a three day supply of dry and canned goods will get you through most thunderstorm-induced blackouts. First, check your pantry. You might well have a supply that will get your through three days without power or transportation. If not, a single trip to the grocery store can get you up and running. Here’s a suggested 3-day list (per person):
•Can opener!
•Trail mix – 8-ounce serving
•Crackers – 1 box (8-ounces or larger)
•Peanut butter – 1 (12-ounce) jar
•Canned juice – 1 6-pack of 6-ounce containers
•Peaches – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Fruit cocktail – 2 (8-ounce) cans
•Beans – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Corn – 1 (8-ounce) can
•Tuna – 1 (3 1/4-ounce) can
•Beef stew or Chili – 2 small cans
•Tomato or other soup – 1 can
•Raisins or dried prunes – 2 12-ounce package
•Mixed nuts – 1 package or jar
•Tea and coffee – 1 box with 16 bags or 1 (2-ounce) jar instant coffee
•Water – 1 gallon
well this is a smart thing to do but I'm afraid even if people started today it is to late!
Thank papaw for teaching us how to survive and live off the land.

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