8 x 8 rule doesn't hold water

8 x 8 rule doesn't hold water

There are 7 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Jul 22, 2008, titled 8 x 8 rule doesn't hold water. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

'Drink eight glasses of water a day." We've heard the advice to drink 8 x 8 for years, even though few of us manage to down that much.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chicago Tribune.

Dave

Chicago, IL

#1 Jul 25, 2008
I would caution against some of the advice given in this article. Dehydration is a very real disease any many people can become violently ill when they become dehydrated. While there is no "proof" that you need 64 ounces of water daily, there is also no evidence supporting minimal water intake either. At this point it seems as though there is no answer to the question and people should drink enough fluid to remain well hydrated and feel well.
eye

Chicago, IL

#2 Jul 25, 2008
Dehydration can induce syncope.
A number of situations can make someone more likely to develop vaso-vagal syncope. The most common example is dehydration, When a person is dehydrated, his overall blood volume is educed below normal. This results, on average, in a heart chamber that is under-filled. When the individual stands up, a certain amount of blood will pool in the lower extremities. Because the heart chamber is starting with a lower volume of blood in it, this drop in filling of the heart chambers triggers the first set of compensatory reflex responses. The heart is then extremely under-filled. It beats faster and more strongly. This activates the sensors that cause vaso-vagal syncope.

Dehydration is more serious than this article implies. Given the amount of nonhydrating liquids people drink, feeling well from drinking enough water would seem to be something most people would not even recognize.
Tina

Los Angeles, CA

#5 Jul 25, 2008
The article didn't say dehydration wasn't dangerous or a serious medical condition. It just says 64 oz. of water is not necessarily a requirement to be healthy. If you like to drink that much water it's fine; you aren't going to poison yourself with 8 eight-ounce glasses each day. But if you just can't stomach that much water (I can't even if I don't eat anything else) it's fine, you are not slowly killing yourself by not forcing water down your throat every 10 minutes.

It is nice to know that that whole 'by the time you're thirsty you're already dehydrated' thing is a myth, I always thought it was a ploy to sell bottled water anyway
Dave

Chicago, IL

#6 Jul 25, 2008
But you have to be very careful in certain climates, such as the desert, because that is more of a reality than a myth, seen by countless physicians in emergency departments. This may not be a randomized control trial, like the PAC that wrote the article used for evidence, but it is real nontheless.
Tina wrote:
The article didn't say dehydration wasn't dangerous or a serious medical condition. It just says 64 oz. of water is not necessarily a requirement to be healthy. If you like to drink that much water it's fine; you aren't going to poison yourself with 8 eight-ounce glasses each day. But if you just can't stomach that much water (I can't even if I don't eat anything else) it's fine, you are not slowly killing yourself by not forcing water down your throat every 10 minutes.
It is nice to know that that whole 'by the time you're thirsty you're already dehydrated' thing is a myth, I always thought it was a ploy to sell bottled water anyway
Joseph Pons

Chicago, IL

#7 Jul 26, 2008
Hydration is wonderful, I dont believe this article, my mother has been sick because she doesnt drink enough water, she is 90, I drink my 8 glasses and even my arthritis feels better. As far as I am concerned and because of my experience, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
Tina

Los Angeles, CA

#8 Jul 26, 2008
Dave wrote:
But you have to be very careful in certain climates, such as the desert, because that is more of a reality than a myth, seen by countless physicians in emergency departments. This may not be a randomized control trial, like the PAC that wrote the article used for evidence, but it is real nontheless.
<quoted text>
well yes, in a hot dry (or even cold dry) desert atmosphere where the air is sucking the water out of you through your skin and lungs you will dehydrate way faster than normal, so you will have less of a window between the time your kidneys tell your brain you need water and when you actually begin to suffer health effects.

On the other hand, if a healthy person in a controlled temperature and humidity climate only drinks a small amount of water all they do is urinate less. You just have to use common sense, if it's hot and dry, drink more (water) than you would if it wasn't.
Union Tom

New York, NY

#9 Jul 29, 2008
Very interesting. I recently convinced myself that the first 10 lbs of my recent 30 lb weight loss was due mostly in part to increasing my water consumption to at least 2 litres per day. I also convinced myself that there is no better cleanse than water

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