For a wounded soldier, a mom keeps fi...

For a wounded soldier, a mom keeps fighting

There are 46 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Dec 11, 2010, titled For a wounded soldier, a mom keeps fighting. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

"Your dad is in the army. The flag is in the army. That's where he works," says Rene Schwappach to her four-year-old granddaughter, Sophia Schwappach, as she plays with a flag she received at a Veteran's Day event, while Rene drives a school bus in Hammond, WI, November 11, 2010.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at TwinCities.com.

Highly Doubt it

New York, NY

#23 Dec 12, 2010
Define exactly what you see as the problem and I will see what I can do. I inferred you didn't think the military took these problems seriously based on your assumptions he would have been treated differently if he was shot. Further, this article and comment section has been generated by an article saying essentially the Army doesn't care which seems contrary to your assertions that the Army and VA are doing a good job.
shhhheasy2u

Fayetteville, NY

#24 Dec 12, 2010
Welcome to Fort Drum, it treats ALL its soldiers very badly. Every soldier that gets here learns real quickly that Fort Drum writes its own laws and rules it does not follow regulations. The Good Ol Boy system is strong in effect here. The soldiers learn here that if you want to hurt or ruin someones career you can with ease. The soldiers that get hurt become a liability and are told they are sorry pieces of crap every day by the ones that should be helping them. They are separated from the "healthy" soldiers now because they were being abused by their chain of command. They are still lunch bag soldiers meaning they carry around bags of medication because it keeps them high and out of the way, so they can't complain and anyone listen because they are on so many drugs. Then they tuck them away till they can put them out of the military raping most of them of their benefits.
Fort Drum is the epitome of what is wrong with todays military. This is Hell and no one wants to investigate the drug abuse, spousal abuse or soldier abuse. I am sorry for your son but if you don't get him out of here he will never get help.
National Guard Mom

United States

#25 Dec 12, 2010
Highly Doubt it wrote:
Define exactly what you see as the problem and I will see what I can do. I inferred you didn't think the military took these problems seriously based on your assumptions he would have been treated differently if he was shot. Further, this article and comment section has been generated by an article saying essentially the Army doesn't care which seems contrary to your assertions that the Army and VA are doing a good job.
Pretty sure it would be so much better to go private email on this one and not knowing how to do that without opening myself up to tons of emails from naysayers, I would like to thank you for the offer of help.

He was asked in the midst of a mental breakdown if he was high (in Iraq) he said "I must be". They sent him to Germany, he was there for two days before his Staff Sargent finally called us (I'm sure this was not his fault what with the time difference and his finally getting to a phone.) Next he was sent not to the post he deployed from (which would have been Fort Bliss) but to Fort Gordon, we had no idea where he was as his Sargent was under the impression that he would be at Bliss. This is where the rear command let our family down, no one from there has ever tried to contact us regarding my son and his hospitalization, or his general whereabouts once he was out of Germany. To go through that was and is a parents worst nightmare.

I will let you know that my son was discharged from the WTU at Fort Gordon with active duty days of 11 months 28 days, if he had stayed the weekend he would have been in a year and thereby eligible for an increased percentage on his schooling benefits. It is my opinion he was released too soon. His inexperience in dealing with medical issues played a major part in how his discharge from the WTU was handled. He was simply asked if he wanted to go home.

We are also dealing with his unit here discharging him and charging us for missing equipment (that they packed in Iraq--he was sent to Germany and then to Georgia with his uniform on and his wallet in his pocket). We have a JAG rep we haven't heard from since September.

The list goes on and on.

Believe me if there is any way you can help regarding this set of circumstances I for one appreaciate your willingness to do so.
unknown

Cedaredge, CO

#26 Dec 12, 2010
handouts
HDI

New York, NY

#27 Dec 12, 2010
National Guard Mom wrote:
<quoted text>
Pretty sure it would be so much better to go private email on this one and not knowing how to do that without opening myself up to tons of emails from naysayers, I would like to thank you for the offer of help.
He was asked in the midst of a mental breakdown if he was high (in Iraq) he said "I must be". They sent him to Germany, he was there for two days before his Staff Sargent finally called us (I'm sure this was not his fault what with the time difference and his finally getting to a phone.) Next he was sent not to the post he deployed from (which would have been Fort Bliss) but to Fort Gordon, we had no idea where he was as his Sargent was under the impression that he would be at Bliss. This is where the rear command let our family down, no one from there has ever tried to contact us regarding my son and his hospitalization, or his general whereabouts once he was out of Germany. To go through that was and is a parents worst nightmare.

I will let you know that my son was discharged from the WTU at Fort Gordon with active duty days of 11 months 28 days, if he had stayed the weekend he would have been in a year and thereby eligible for an increased percentage on his schooling benefits. It is my opinion he was released too soon. His inexperience in dealing with medical issues played a major part in how his discharge from the WTU was handled. He was simply asked if he wanted to go home.
We are also dealing with his unit here discharging him and charging us for missing equipment (that they packed in Iraq--he was sent to Germany and then to Georgia with his uniform on and his wallet in his pocket). We have a JAG rep we haven't heard from since September.
The list goes on and on.
Believe me if there is any way you can help regarding this set of circumstances I for one appreaciate your willingness to do so.
Certainly the system is hard to navigate, especially for Guard and Reserve Soldiers. I would try to get on the Battallion Commanders calendar and make sure he is aware of the situation. Each state also has a "State Surgeon General" who is responsible for all the medical care of the Soldiers in his state. I would contact him as well. If all else fails, contact your congressman and file a "congressional"; though people get stand offish at that point and should be used as a last resort. There should also be "ombudsmen" who will act as a go between for you/your son, and the command. They should be his advocate. Also check out military one-source. Start at the lowest level and clarify the situation. It is the fastest way to get things done, and generally if you can get them to see your point of view, they are best positioned to get things done or at least be in your corner. Remember you get more fly's with honey. Generally, people will treat you the way you treat them. Obviously I have no idea how your interactions have been thus far, but if you go in with the assumption with a perceived "attitude" you won't get much help. Thats the reality. Also, start keeping names and dates.

Good luck to you and your son.
National Guard Mom

United States

#28 Dec 12, 2010
HDI wrote:
<quoted text>
Certainly the system is hard to navigate, especially for Guard and Reserve Soldiers. I would try to get on the Battallion Commanders calendar and make sure he is aware of the situation. Each state also has a "State Surgeon General" who is responsible for all the medical care of the Soldiers in his state. I would contact him as well. If all else fails, contact your congressman and file a "congressional"; though people get stand offish at that point and should be used as a last resort. There should also be "ombudsmen" who will act as a go between for you/your son, and the command. They should be his advocate. Also check out military one-source. Start at the lowest level and clarify the situation. It is the fastest way to get things done, and generally if you can get them to see your point of view, they are best positioned to get things done or at least be in your corner. Remember you get more fly's with honey. Generally, people will treat you the way you treat them. Obviously I have no idea how your interactions have been thus far, but if you go in with the assumption with a perceived "attitude" you won't get much help. Thats the reality. Also, start keeping names and dates.
Good luck to you and your son.
Thank you so much, you have given me some starting points, believe me I will treat them with the utmost respect. I know that they are probably overwhelmed with all the troops returning to WI.

Thanks again, I just wish I could keep you up to date on our progress.
bonnie

Rochester, MN

#29 Dec 12, 2010
it is clear that if you do not have a soldier going thru this you will never know or understand the pain a family goes threw. not just the family but the soldier themselves...they do not know why they do what they do....they don't understand and they cannot seperate the war from life here in the states.

also the person who wrote this only told you what they wanted you to know....what was said that wasn't printed?????? and no matter how good you are, you cannot write pain....you cannot explain the pain and emotional pain that mother is going threw. if it is not a mother, it will be a spouse....some one has to be there to catch that soldier on the falls....some one is there to take that soldier to the ER...or to stop them from taking their own life....
if a soldier does not show ptsd when they come home, it will happen some time in there life time...this we know from research and experience.....even the vietnam vets are experiencing ptsd...thank those vietnam soldiers for what help there is out there, because they are the ones who have fought for the programs we have for soldiers now. THANK YOU TO ALL THE VIET NAM VETS FOR YOUR HELP.
army mom in GA

Canton, GA

#30 Dec 12, 2010
I am ashamed at some of the callous remarks made regarding these soldiers. Unless you have personally been a part of this situation, you just don't "get it". I hear and read sooooooooooo many reports of soldiers coming back and not getting the treatment they need and deserve. It's almost like, "you've done your job, now you're back and useless to us."

Many thanks to those offering helpful suggestions to get these guys the help they need. And to all the soldiers - and their families - keep up the good fight. You've got a lot of strong people in your corner, and your guys are worth fighting for!
Proud Sister of a Soldier

Vancouver, WA

#31 Dec 12, 2010
People seem so quick to judge. I don't think anyone knows what it's like to go thru PTSD or any other mental disorders unless they've actually experienced it themselves. My brother served in Iraq and suffered from PTSD. Fortunately, he was able to talk to my parents when he was at a low point and was instantly admitted to the VA where he underwent therapy. It's hard to see someone suffer so much and my heart goes out to all those who have had similar experiences. Life is short, we have to make the best of it. But, some are not so lucky with the cards that are dealt. Have sympathy!
don wun 20

Killeen, TX

#32 Dec 12, 2010
oh how ridiculous can we get of course everyone will claim ptsd to get money in desert storm we stopped and took picture with guys who had been fried to the steering wheel by the infantry just a black skeleton
Deb Wolbeck

Eden Valley, MN

#33 Dec 12, 2010
try the VSO--Veteran's Service Officer for your area to see what they can do for your son. I had a son (28) who passed away in July who was a Marine. His unit was the first into Iraq and he came home with PTSD. It is a horrible illness and takes a toll on the entire family. God bless and good luck to you and your family
Golddragon

Watertown, NY

#34 Dec 12, 2010
I've deployed to more than 5 different combat zones with the Tenth, I've been in some good fights and seen some bad things. Some people join and expect to see some of the worst in human nature. Others join and expect to see an adventure, get some college money and go back home and be successfull just because they did some time. Most of the PTSD cases in my opinion are just people getting over on the system, Yep, I said it. Look at this guy, His mom is doing wehat she thinks is right for him. Did she sign the paper for him to jopin the Army too.
Linda

Elk River, MN

#35 Dec 12, 2010
Get REAL, you are saying the silly thing. If you never was in the army especially during the war. Do you know what does it mean to loose friends, to see them dying, to know that you cannot help them. If it is so easy for you kill people and loose friends, go and fight. Instead of protecting military people we think about ambitions of the politicians; instead of taking care of the soldiers people like you do not care about them. Believe me mothers of people who protect you have all the rights to blame and the politicians and the military that does not want to protect lives of the people who serve this country the best they can. Your comment should be removed from the internet since it does not present you as a good person.
Active Duty

Fayetteville, NY

#36 Dec 12, 2010
Soldiers have so many case managers and medical care providers managing their care that there is absolutely no reason that this mother should be concerning herself with her grown son's care. If he is in the WTU, his company commander along with medical care professionals have completed a WWSC nomination packet for him. Everyone needs to remember that just because a Soldier claims to have PTSD doesn't mean that he or she HAS PTSD and that once a soldier claims PTSD they automatically are evaluated for it on Fort Drum. Basically mommy didn't get th answer she wanted and went to the news. I am active duty military by the way, and was in Afghanistan for a year as a team leader.
Active Duty

Fayetteville, NY

#37 Dec 12, 2010
Linda wrote:
Get REAL, you are saying the silly thing. If you never was in the army especially during the war. Do you know what does it mean to loose friends, to see them dying, to know that you cannot help them. If it is so easy for you kill people and loose friends, go and fight. Instead of protecting military people we think about ambitions of the politicians; instead of taking care of the soldiers people like you do not care about them. Believe me mothers of people who protect you have all the rights to blame and the politicians and the military that does not want to protect lives of the people who serve this country the best they can. Your comment should be removed from the internet since it does not present you as a good person.
I'm in the army, I know what it means to LOSE friends, and soldiers enlist under their own will. The big bad army isn't forcing our nations kids to join the Army, and grown men and women don't need their mommy to whine to the boss for them. You don't see police officer's mothers complaining to the chief of police that their child has to fight with bad men every night, do you? I'll qualify my comment with the fact that I am active duty military and I was a police officer before that.
kathy

Cherokee, IA

#38 Dec 12, 2010
I think we have to get wise as to why our sons are really in this so called war.
we have to stop sending them off in all our ignorance.Telling our selves they are heros. they are not. Try understanding in life , you get as good as what you give. Putting a uniform on and killing in the name of freedom, get smart moms. Educate yourself to why they are really over there. Ignorance is not good enough any more. dont cry when your beautiful sons and daughters come home this way. And then get shafted even more by private war racketeers in the name of capitalism for the banking boys. WAKE UP.
Deployed in Iraq

France

#40 Dec 12, 2010
38bud wrote:
<quoted text>Maybe you should strap on some boots and a uniform and go over there and serve If you were any kind of person you wouldn't be talking down on our military people. You should get your **** kicked for that
Look at the address - APO AE - he is. I also think his opinion is very severe. I do not encounter that here among deployed soldiers - we try to support each other. Balad, Iraq
Taicho

Ivins, UT

#41 Dec 13, 2010
You don't really explain how or whether he was actually wounded.

PTSD is hardly a wound. It is a mental condition caused by combat or other things. The purple heart is issued to those wounded by the enemy. It is not and should not be issued for PTSD.

I am a combat veteran of the Korean War. We had more casualties in the 1st Marine division in 4 weeks in the Chosin Reservoir than all the troops in Iraq and Afghanistan have in 10 years.

I like most combat veterans of the 2nd war or Korea and Vietnam have PTSD. It wasn't recognized by the VA until 1980.

Today there is much fraud involved in PTSD. If it is really bad he should be medically retired and take it up with the VA.
angry taxpayer

Little Falls, MN

#42 Dec 13, 2010
Americans should be ashamed of this country when we let one of our soldiers go untreated after putting them into hell. Shame!
mom of solider

Canton, NY

#43 Dec 14, 2010
I am also worried abut PSTD when my son comes home. He was home on his R&R last month and is wife told me that he was having nightmares.He would get up during the night and go to the closet and yell,he would look awake but he was not.Now he is back in Afghanistan and i worry everyday all day. My son also told me that he has nightmares while he is there,he wakes up and all his stuff is thrown around which he actually did it ,he felt like he was fighting some one. My son has seen to many dead soliders that he has had to go pick up.My son also has alot of issues with his wife she tells him she does not want to be with him any more.They have a baby girl who is 21/2 and that baby loves her daddy andhe loves her. All this stress is getting to him.
I am sorry that the Army really is not there for these guys. I have come to see it more and more. God Bless our Soldiers

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Hammond Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Prison worker from Eau Claire accused of sex wi... Oct '16 abis17 1
News GM recall: Lawmakers, families condemn governme... (Mar '14) Mar '14 lolol 2
dustin jonnson (Feb '13) Feb '13 wild kid 2
make up to $100 a day (Jan '13) Jan '13 abj 1
Do you think the Hammond, WI village council is... (Sep '11) Sep '11 ConcernedCitizen 1
News Hammond / Benefit planned for combat troops (Dec '10) Dec '10 Patriot 5
Election Who do you support for U.S. House in Wisconsin ... (Oct '10) Nov '10 Ski 30

Hammond Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Hammond Mortgages