Homeless in Decatur County

Full story: Greensburg Daily News

When talking or thinking about Decatur County, most residents probably wouldn't list homelessness as one of the area's most pressing problems.

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Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#105
Mar 25, 2013
 

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Nobody Important wrote:
Our nation's charter begins with "We the People," and the "one percent" lose sight of it. Otherwise ...

What is a taxpayer without representation but a disenfranchised citizen?

What are the "one percent" when they hold wealth as their virtue?
The above begs to consider....

What is the economic standing of the disinfranchised?

How has "one percent" virtue grown in the last four decades?

Read on ... Income Growth For Bottom 90 Percent Of Americans Averaged Just $59 Over 4 Decades

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/25/inco...

[An excerpt]

Another day, another mind-blowing fact about the staggering difference between the haves and the have-nots. Incomes for the bottom 90 percent of Americans only grew by $59 on average between 1966 and 2011 (when you adjust those incomes for inflation), according to an analysis by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston for Tax Analysts. During the same period, the average income for the top 10 percent of Americans rose by $116,071, Johnston found.

To put that into perspective: if you say the $59 boost is equivalent to one inch, then the incomes of the top 10 percent of Americans rose by 168 feet, Johnston explained to Alternet last week.[...]

Incomes for the bottom fifth of Americans, for instance, grew about 20 percent between 1979 and 2007, according to a 2011 study from the Congressional Budget Office. During the same period, members of the top 1 percent saw their incomes grow by 275 percent.[...]

The six heirs to the Walmart fortune had a net worth equivalent to the bottom 41.5 percent of Americans combined in 2010, according to an analysis from Josh Bivens at the Economic Policy Institute.

[End of excerpt]

There exists THAT kind of wealth, and Greensburg's "one percent" can't find it in their hearts to help the homeless have a place to stay warm and dry.

For shame. For shame.
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#106
Mar 25, 2013
 

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Nobody Important wrote:
There exists THAT kind of wealth, and Greensburg's "one percent" can't find it in their hearts to help the homeless have a place to stay warm and dry.

For shame. For shame.
I'll almost bet the wealthy didn't realize that giving is as beneficial for them as it is for the recipient....

How poor is poor? How rich is rich?
By John Yemma, October 7, 2012

http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/editors-b...

[An excerpt]

The poverty line is as individual as the people it defines. Circumstances vary, geography is a factor, family and community play a role, and everybody makes choices.[...] In Tom Wolfe’s satire on 1980s-era New York, "Bonfire of the Vanities," the protagonist runs through his budget and shows how a $1 million salary is not enough to support his lifestyle. By most of the world’s standards, this "master of the universe" is clearly wealthy. Outside his Manhattan cocoon, he would be rich. But he feels poor. He suffers from a problem that money can’t solve: poverty of spirit. In other words, he is unhappy.[...] So here’s a corollary to our cover-story question: What defines a happy person? It’s one thing to achieve basic needs, another to feel comfortable, but how much money is needed to feel happy?[...]

According to a 2008-09 study of 450,000 Americans by researchers at Princeton University, more money doesn’t just help the poor live better lives; it helps them feel better about life. "The pain of life’s misfortunes, including disease, divorce, and being alone, is exacerbated by poverty," the authors write. Increased incomes improves the conditions of the poor. But only up to a point. Above $75,000, money does not produce commensurate happiness. Chasing higher and higher income actually decreases your quality of life. That’s because the quest for money and material comforts appears to shut off other forms of enrichment – family, friendships, hobbies, intellectual and spiritual pursuits, appreciation of nature. "The price of anything," that guru of simplicity, Henry David Thoreau, wrote, "is the amount of life you exchange for it." [...]

The diminishing returns of wealth don’t just affect individuals. A 2010 report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that, over the long run, happiness does not increase as a country’s overall income increases. Examined over a period of 10 years or more, a nation’s gross domestic happiness is independent of rising income.

So here’s the takeaway from our social scientists: Poverty is bad. Breaking people out of it is enormously important. But poverty is also a state of mind. As is affluence. More money makes people feel better, but only up to a point. Real happiness is tied to appreciation, to deeper pursuits, and to helping others.

[End of excerpt]

Perhaps Nelson Mowrey knew something that the current generation of Greensburg's "one percent" has yet to discover.
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#107
Mar 26, 2013
 

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C'mon, "one percent."

Per the above article, conversion of the old YMCA building will serve to resolve two problems ... shelter for the homeless, and uplifting your spirits. "More money makes people feel better, but only up to a point. Real happiness is tied to appreciation, to deeper pursuits, and to helping others."

Surely, the mayor can recognize the dilemma!
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#108
Apr 24, 2013
 

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Nobody Important wrote:
What is the economic standing of the disinfranchised?

How has "one percent" virtue grown in the last four decades?

Income Growth For Bottom 90 Percent Of Americans Averaged Just $59 Over 4 Decades

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/25/inco...

There exists THAT kind of wealth, and Greensburg's "one percent" can't find it in their hearts to help the homeless have a place to stay warm and dry. For shame. For shame.
There's even more to say.... Richest 7% in US got richer during recovery

http://www.indystar.com/viewart/20130423/BUSI...

[An excerpt]

The richest Americans got richer during the first two years of the economic recovery while average net worth declined for the other 93 percent of U.S. households, says a report released Tuesday.

The upper 7 percent of households owned 63 percent of the nation’s total household wealth in 2011, up from 56 percent in 2009, said the report from the Pew Research Center, which analyzed new Census Bureau data released last month.

The main reason for the widening wealth gap is that affluent households typically own stocks and other financial holdings that increased in value, while the less wealthy tend to have more of their assets in their homes, which haven’t rebounded from the plunge in home values, the report said.

Tuesday’s report is the latest to point up financial inequality that has been growing among Americans for decades, a development that helped fuel the Occupy Wall Street protests.

A September Census Bureau report on income found that the highest-earning 20 percent of households earned more than half of all income the previous year, the biggest share in records kept since 1967. A 2011 Congressional Budget Office report said incomes for the richest 1 percent soared 275 percent between 1979 and 2007 while increasing just under 40 percent for the middle 60 percent of Americans.

— Overall, the wealth of American households rose by $5 trillion, or 14 percent, during the period to $40.2 trillion in 2011 from $35.2 trillion in 2009. Household wealth is the sum of all assets such as a home, car and stocks, minus the sum of all debts.

— The average net worth of households in the upper 7 percent of the wealth distribution rose by an estimated 28 percent, while that of households in the lower 93 percent dropped by 4 percent. That is, the mean wealth of the 8 million households in the more affluent group rose to an estimated $3.2 million from an estimated $2.5 million while that of the 111 million households in the less affluent group fell to roughly $134,000 from $140,000.

— The upper 7 percent were the households with a net worth above $836,033 and the 93 percent represented households whose worth was at or below that. Not all households among the 93 percent saw a decline in net worth, but the average amount declined for that group.

[End of excerpt]

In view of the above, Greensburg's "one percent" want to expand the airport on the backs of "John Q. Taxpayer" so they have somewhere to park their expensive toys between weekend trips to more exciting places. And they act as if providing a place where the unfortunate can seek refuge is asking too much of them.
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#109
Apr 24, 2013
 

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Nobody Important wrote:
There's even more to say.... Richest 7% in US got richer during recovery

http://www.indystar.com/viewart/20130423/BUSI...

In view of the above, Greensburg's "one percent" want to expand the airport on the backs of "John Q. Taxpayer" so they have somewhere to park their expensive toys between weekend trips to more exciting places. And they act as if providing a place where the unfortunate can seek refuge is asking too much of them.
Here's an indicator of how wealthy kids view homelessness....

Indiana University sorority apologizes for homelessness party theme

http://www.indystar.com/article/20130423/LIFE... |mostcom

[An excerpt]

Indiana University’s Kappa Delta sorority is drawing fire over a recent party theme: homelessness. The girls smudged fake dirt on their faces, donned cutoff denim shorts, tank tops and plaid shirts. They then made cardboard placards with statements such as, "Why lie: It's for booze" and "Give me a nickel and I’ll tickle your pickle," according to a report in the online magazine Jezebel....

Advocates for the homeless said the event reflects how difficult it can be to understand the plight of the homeless. "It just goes to show how many misconceptions there are out there about struggles or causes of homelessness," said Christy Shepard, executive director of the Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention in Indianapolis.

Forrest Gilmore, executive director of the Shalom Commmunity Center in Bloomington, agreed in an email that the sorority is not alone in its attitude toward the homeless. "Making fun of a life-threatening issue is no joke. Unfortunately, the actions of this sorority represent a wider community prejudice that must come to an end," he wrote.

Not all college students are oblivious, Shepard added. Many Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis students volunteer with the coalition, she said. The IU sorority party came to light because another Bloomington student tipped off the online magazine, complete with a picture of the sorority sisters with their faces blurred out.

Indiana University’s Panhellenic Association, made up of 21 all-women chapters on the campus, also spoke out against the party theme, saying that actions like this are not tolerated on campus. "Our goal now is to ensure that the entire Greek community benefits and remembers that the community will not allow any type of cavalier joking of a serious issue," President Anjulia Urasky wrote in an email. "We want the Greek members to understand the serious problem of the homeless in the country, especially in our own town of Bloomington."

[End of excerpt]

Can the same be said of our own town of Greensburg? Or will Greensburg's "one percent" say things, like "Why lie?... It's for booze." Or "I'll give you a nickel to tickle my pickle!"
whatever

Greensburg, IN

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#110
Apr 24, 2013
 

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"our town Greensburg" did you move back?
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#111
Apr 25, 2013
 

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whatever wrote:
"Our town Greensburg." Did you move back?
Judged as "nuts, disagree, and mean." Got it, Rick?
whatever

Greensburg, IN

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#112
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Dear Nuts Clueless and Spam (aka Nobody Important) I am not Rick. I merely ask because you say "our town Greensburg" yet you are still listed as from Greenwood? I wondered if you might now qualify to sit on boards per MJJ's criteria?
M Jean Johannigman

Greensburg, IN

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#113
Apr 25, 2013
 

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whatever wrote:
Dear Nuts Clueless and Spam (aka Nobody Important) I am not Rick. I merely ask because you say "our town Greensburg" yet you are still listed as from Greenwood? I wondered if you might now qualify to sit on boards per MJJ's criteria?
Oh...by "MJJ's criteria" do you mean that I think a CITY board that is making a 32 million dollar decision on behalf of the CITY taxpayers should be made up of CITY residents? Yes! I stand by that.

It may be allowable by State statute....but that doesn't make it morally right.

The quote that comes to mind with this is:

"Taxation without Representation".

It is always easier to spend the CITY taxpayers money when you are not paying into the CITY with your own taxes.

Since: Nov 12

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#114
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Nobody Important wrote:
<quoted text>
Judged as "nuts, disagree, and mean." Got it, Rick?
It wasn't my post dumb and dumber.
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#115
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Worth repeating....

How poor is poor? How rich is rich?
By John Yemma, October 7, 2012

http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/editors-b...

[An excerpt]

In Tom Wolfe’s satire on 1980s-era New York, "Bonfire of the Vanities," the protagonist runs through his budget and shows how a $1 million salary is not enough to support his lifestyle. By most of the world’s standards, this "master of the universe" is clearly wealthy. Outside his Manhattan cocoon, he would be rich. But he feels poor. He suffers from a problem that money can’t solve: poverty of spirit. In other words, he is unhappy.[...] So here’s a corollary to our cover-story question: What defines a happy person? It’s one thing to achieve basic needs, another to feel comfortable, but how much money is needed to feel happy?[...]

According to a 2008-09 study of 450,000 Americans by researchers at Princeton University, more money doesn’t just help the poor live better lives; it helps them feel better about life. "The pain of life’s misfortunes, including disease, divorce, and being alone, is exacerbated by poverty," the authors write. Increased incomes improves the conditions of the poor. But only up to a point.

Above $75,000, money does not produce commensurate happiness. Chasing higher and higher income actually decreases your quality of life. That’s because the quest for money and material comforts appears to shut off other forms of enrichment – family, friendships, hobbies, intellectual and spiritual pursuits, appreciation of nature. "The price of anything," that guru of simplicity, Henry David Thoreau, wrote, "is the amount of life you exchange for it." [...]

The diminishing returns of wealth don’t just affect individuals. A 2010 report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that, over the long run, happiness does not increase as a country’s overall income increases. Examined over a period of 10 years or more, a nation’s gross domestic happiness is independent of rising income.

So here’s the takeaway from our social scientists: Poverty is bad. Breaking people out of it is enormously important. But poverty is also a state of mind. As is affluence. More money makes people feel better, but only up to a point. Real happiness is tied to appreciation, to deeper pursuits, and to helping others.

[End of excerpt]

Greensburg's "one percent" are oblivious to their condition. How very sad!
whatever

Greensburg, IN

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#116
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Yes, MJJ, I was referring to your criteria. If someone isnt a resident of the area then why does he feel the need to exert his influence. Was he banned from Greenwood?
Hello Nopo

Greensburg, IN

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#117
Apr 25, 2013
 
Old Nopo only reads the Pravda run news outlets. A true American would not use the communist "news" outlets. Everyone is poor in their "newspaper", but the countries that they represent are truly poor. Cuba, Vietnam, Cheznya, Russia and many other well off countries.
Of course, if Nopo went to a legitimate news outlet, he would have to deal with the truth and that is something he has been able to avoid, for years.
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#118
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Is my "influence" regarding the plight of the homeless upsetting?

Is it disturbing that I bring economic disparity to light?

Is it better that the lower gentry be kept uninformed of their condition?

Is it better that the lower gentry be kept uninformed of YOUR condition?
M Jean Johannigman

Greensburg, IN

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#119
Apr 25, 2013
 

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whatever wrote:
Yes, MJJ, I was referring to your criteria. If someone isnt a resident of the area then why does he feel the need to exert his influence. Was he banned from Greenwood?
I think it is called the right to FREE SPEECH.

At least he is not a COUNTY PERSON sitting on a CITY board making decisions for the CITY taxpayers that he won't be paying tax on since he is not a resident of the CITY.

Since: Nov 12

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#120
Apr 25, 2013
 
M Jean Johannigman wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it is called the right to FREE SPEECH.
At least he is not a COUNTY PERSON sitting on a CITY board making decisions for the CITY taxpayers that he won't be paying tax on since he is not a resident of the CITY.
Blah blah. It does not matter. The Mayor could easily find someone who lives in the city that supports the airport CIP to appoint to the board.

However the mayor might not be able to find someone with as much knowledge of aviation.

It is really a moot point. I'll go on the board. I live in the city. Then what's your beef?
Nobody Important

Greenwood, IN

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#121
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Hello Nopo wrote:
Old Nopo only reads the Pravda run news outlets. A true American would not use the communist "news" outlets. Everyone is poor in their "newspaper", but the countries that they represent are truly poor. Cuba, Vietnam, Cheznya, Russia and many other well off countries.
Willy Wilhoit was the last to play the "commie" card on these threads. Here's how that game is played.... When there's nothing to say, then counter by charging that your adversary isn't a true American and that his/her loyalties are with a communist regime.

The "commie" card is the next best thing to playing the "patriot" card while running an American flag up a post. Both amount to bedazzling the reader with ideology that substitutes for facts.
M Jean Johannigman

Greensburg, IN

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#122
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Rick Fayette wrote:
<quoted text>
Then what's your beef?
I don't know of any article that I have researched that explains "my beef" better than this one.

Consequences and public funding

February 18, 2013 by Kent Misegades 7 Comments

While reading “Inclined to Liberty” by Louis E. Carabini, it struck me that chapter 29, The Hazard of Equalizing Consequences, describes what one often sees at publicly-funded general aviation airports in my home state of North Carolina.

Taj Mahal-like, LEED-certififed terminals bristling with solar panels at rural airstrips where more coyotes walk the ramp than pilots. Board rooms in those terminals with polished oak tables and deep leather seats that would be considered opulent for most private businesses. Gleaming aircraft refuelers manned by a full staff of line personnel in starched logo shirts who spend more time drinking coffee than servicing the handful of aircraft that happen by on a day with good weather. Whether the funding for all these things comes from the federal Airport Improvement Program (AIP), state or local sources, they all have two things in common — they are paid by the sole provider of public funding, taxpayers, and the consequences for their approval are not born by the people who approved them.

As Carabini points out:“When people are responsible for their own actions, they have a vested interest in making ‘right’ decisions, since they bear the primary cost of their mistakes.”

The problem with public funding is that multiple layers of ‘insulation’ are placed between the people spending tax dollars and the people paying those dollars. Here’s how the process generally works: Pilot/taxpayers make requests to the airport management for new facilities or services. The airport’s owner, typically a town or county, has its own set of priorities, which may or may not correspond to those of pilots, for instance when they are related to economic development. Enter the airport consultant — the firm that specializes in converting wish lists into concrete proposals and carrying out the work when funding is approved. Like any good middle-man, the airport consultant makes his money on the fees assessed for his services, which naturally leads to gilded projects requiring large numbers of billable hours.

Next comes the Kabuki dance — posturing between the airport consultants and the government’s gate-keepers, the people in a state’s division of aviation who dole out the funding. That consultants are very good at this dance can be seen at any given annual conference for a state airport association. The largest sponsors and exhibitors are invariably the consultants. It also comes as no surprise that there exists a revolving door between the bureaucrats who control who-gets-what and the management of leading consulting firms.

As a supplier of turnkey fuel systems to GA airports, I see countless examples of misguided funding that comes as a result of Carabini’s ‘Hazard of Equalizing Consequences’.

Had any of these projects been privately-funded by an individual or group expecting a return on their investment, there would be severe consequences for the vast sums of money that have been wasted. On the contrary, in nearly all cases, taxpayer-funded airports are proud of their accomplishments spending someone else’s money. The airport consultants and construction companies involved are equally pleased.

And who could blame them really, since there are no consequences for irresponsible spending of taxpayer dollars? As Carabini explains,“When the State diminishes the effect of feedback of our mistakes, it also weakens the lessons we will learn from those mistakes.”

Until layers of government and middle-men are removed from the process and those who spend our money are held responsible, public funding of our airports will result in the highest possible costs. Do you see such waste at your state’s public airports?

http://www.generalaviationnews.com/2013/02/co ...
M Jean Johannigman

Greensburg, IN

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#123
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Rick Fayette wrote:
<quoted text>
Then what's your beef?
I don't think I have ever seen an article that explains what the beef is better than this one.

Consequences and public funding

February 18, 2013 by Kent Misegades 7 Comments

While reading “Inclined to Liberty” by Louis E. Carabini, it struck me that chapter 29, The Hazard of Equalizing Consequences, describes what one often sees at publicly-funded general aviation airports in my home state of North Carolina.

Taj Mahal-like, LEED-certififed terminals bristling with solar panels at rural airstrips where more coyotes walk the ramp than pilots. Board rooms in those terminals with polished oak tables and deep leather seats that would be considered opulent for most private businesses. Gleaming aircraft refuelers manned by a full staff of line personnel in starched logo shirts who spend more time drinking coffee than servicing the handful of aircraft that happen by on a day with good weather. Whether the funding for all these things comes from the federal Airport Improvement Program (AIP), state or local sources, they all have two things in common — they are paid by the sole provider of public funding, taxpayers, and the consequences for their approval are not born by the people who approved them.

As Carabini points out:“When people are responsible for their own actions, they have a vested interest in making ‘right’ decisions, since they bear the primary cost of their mistakes.”

The problem with public funding is that multiple layers of ‘insulation’ are placed between the people spending tax dollars and the people paying those dollars. Here’s how the process generally works: Pilot/taxpayers make requests to the airport management for new facilities or services. The airport’s owner, typically a town or county, has its own set of priorities, which may or may not correspond to those of pilots, for instance when they are related to economic development. Enter the airport consultant — the firm that specializes in converting wish lists into concrete proposals and carrying out the work when funding is approved. Like any good middle-man, the airport consultant makes his money on the fees assessed for his services, which naturally leads to gilded projects requiring large numbers of billable hours.

Next comes the Kabuki dance — posturing between the airport consultants and the government’s gate-keepers, the people in a state’s division of aviation who dole out the funding. That consultants are very good at this dance can be seen at any given annual conference for a state airport association. The largest sponsors and exhibitors are invariably the consultants. It also comes as no surprise that there exists a revolving door between the bureaucrats who control who-gets-what and the management of leading consulting firms.

As a supplier of turnkey fuel systems to GA airports, I see countless examples of misguided funding that comes as a result of Carabini’s ‘Hazard of Equalizing Consequences’.

Had any of these projects been privately-funded by an individual or group expecting a return on their investment, there would be severe consequences for the vast sums of money that have been wasted. On the contrary, in nearly all cases, taxpayer-funded airports are proud of their accomplishments spending someone else’s money. The airport consultants and construction companies involved are equally pleased.

And who could blame them really, since there are no consequences for irresponsible spending of taxpayer dollars? As Carabini explains,“When the State diminishes the effect of feedback of our mistakes, it also weakens the lessons we will learn from those mistakes.”

Until layers of government and middle-men are removed from the process and those who spend our money are held responsible, public funding of our airports will result in the highest possible costs. Do you see such waste at your state’s public airports?

http://www.generalaviationnews.com/2013/02/co ...
whatever

Greensburg, IN

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#124
Apr 25, 2013
 

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Blah, Blah, Blah is right. Again who appointed you to the moral police? You have a beef. LOBBY the state. Get it done. Otherwise. Shut up. Its as old a song as your platform. What plank will you pull out next?

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