new director

Greeneville, TN

#176 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
Surely you don't think that as a parent that you bear no responsibility in the education of your child? Yes, teachers are paid to teach, but they have no control as to what happens at home. I pay my doctor to help me stay healthy but if I maintain a poor diet, smoke, never exercise is it his fault if I am in poor health? Teachers go above and beyond but they can't make sure a child is going to bed at a decent time. They can't make sure he isn't sitting home playing video games all night instead of reading or being read to. They can't make sure the child is getting proper nutrition and not gorging on junk food. Finally there just isn't enough time in the day to work with each child one on one. And yes, if your child is struggling to learn by all means hire a tutor. Sometimes a child requires more intensive help than a teacher can provide in the classroom. This may seem like an extreme measure to you, but I can assure you in many countries it is common. In Japan 90.8% of parents send their children to a juku, or cram school. This is another school they attend after school hours that their parents pay for. 65.2% of children attend cram school four or more days a week.
I am sorry but teachers have to be some of the problems our schools are facing. Someone mentioned Ms. Lamons earlier. I don't dislike Julia, but an educator she is not. West Greene has had nothing but failed principals for a long time now. I also liked Larry Bible, but a principal he was not. I am not sure about the problem as a whole, but I do know that over the years teaching and principal jobs have been handed down because of who that person knew. Nepotism is at an all time high in schools locally and that hurts the children's chances of a good education. "Family and friend's" ran anything is just not productive no matter what the circumstance. Change is desperately needed and I would suggest a new director for starters.
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#177 Jun 29, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>My suggestion is that you and your "pretend" friend go to Japan and work. Teachers wear uniforms ( like the students) in many schools. That would be a good move, have you seen how a lot of teachers dress now? Tight and low for a lot of females. The men dress better. Teachers in Japan have to be above reproach at work, or at home. Their day is very scheduled. They have their plan time after the kids are gone. Yes, go there and work and learn how to be a teacher. Now that's a novel idea. There is a lot more accountability all the way around in Japan. Oh, and teachers take it personally if their students don't do well.
Teachers now days want to blame anybody, or thing, on why tests scores aren't better. Really, the public just "ain't" buying it anymore. Do your job, or go home and let someone else get the job done. In the real world if you can't get the job done, they have no problem letting you go so they can find someone who can produce the results they want.
Good teachers should get paid more than the incompetent teachers. That's how you keep your good employees. Not rewarding the good and bad like they do now. I sure wouldn't like the person who's on their cellphone, or trying every way they could to get out of work make what I make when I bust my rear to give 110 percent. That's not right.....
Methinks your accusation on me being a multiple poster of sorts centers around your own issues. Perhaps YOU have your own imaginary friends. And perhaps these imaginary friend schools you on Japan culture. Yes, students wear uniforms in Japanese schools but teachers do not. Maybe your issues with how teachers dress is due to your own insecurities. Yes, teachers are held accountable in Japan, but parents and the students themselves are held equally accountable. If a student is failing it is assumed it is due to the student's lack of effort. So you think teachers want to blame everyone else? Interesting. Since your post is full of blame. And it isn't yourself you are blaming.

Since: Feb 14

Location hidden

#178 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
Methinks your accusation on me being a multiple poster of sorts centers around your own issues. Perhaps YOU have your own imaginary friends. And perhaps these imaginary friend schools you on Japan culture. Yes, students wear uniforms in Japanese schools but teachers do not. Maybe your issues with how teachers dress is due to your own insecurities. Yes, teachers are held accountable in Japan, but parents and the students themselves are held equally accountable. If a student is failing it is assumed it is due to the student's lack of effort. So you think teachers want to blame everyone else? Interesting. Since your post is full of blame. And it isn't yourself you are blaming.
I don't care who you are,any of you for that matter. But I have been greatly enlightened by all of you posters on this thread, so please don't start insinuations due to debate fatigue. Excellent posts by all of you and very informative.
need em now

Greeneville, TN

#179 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
Methinks your accusation on me being a multiple poster of sorts centers around your own issues. Perhaps YOU have your own imaginary friends. And perhaps these imaginary friend schools you on Japan culture. Yes, students wear uniforms in Japanese schools but teachers do not. Maybe your issues with how teachers dress is due to your own insecurities. Yes, teachers are held accountable in Japan, but parents and the students themselves are held equally accountable. If a student is failing it is assumed it is due to the student's lack of effort. So you think teachers want to blame everyone else? Interesting. Since your post is full of blame. And it isn't yourself you are blaming.
You are the reason teachers need to be drug tested and have serious background checks.
Looked

Butler, TN

#180 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
Methinks your accusation on me being a multiple poster of sorts centers around your own issues. Perhaps YOU have your own imaginary friends. And perhaps these imaginary friend schools you on Japan culture. Yes, students wear uniforms in Japanese schools but teachers do not. Maybe your issues with how teachers dress is due to your own insecurities. Yes, teachers are held accountable in Japan, but parents and the students themselves are held equally accountable. If a student is failing it is assumed it is due to the student's lack of effort. So you think teachers want to blame everyone else? Interesting. Since your post is full of blame. And it isn't yourself you are blaming.
For starters, I have a very good friend that lived in Japan for years. So, I'm pretty sure she knows better than we do what the culture is really like. According to you, teachers bear no blame for the systems poor test scores....that's why the system isn't moving forward. A lot of employees want more money( we ALL know the Mantra- we don't make as much as someone else),(and they are getting more every year), but we aren't getting more for our money.
Oh, and about the dress code, I can assure you worrying about any insecurities I might have, have nothing to do with knowing how to dress appropriately to be a role model for children. If you want to be treated like a professional and be respected, dress like it! Stop trying to look like one of the children, and PLEASE look in the mirror, you can't fit a size 14 in a size 8 or ten. Not pretty......
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#181 Jun 29, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>For starters, I have a very good friend that lived in Japan for years. So, I'm pretty sure she knows better than we do what the culture is really like. According to you, teachers bear no blame for the systems poor test scores....that's why the system isn't moving forward. A lot of employees want more money( we ALL know the Mantra- we don't make as much as someone else),(and they are getting more every year), but we aren't getting more for our money.
Oh, and about the dress code, I can assure you worrying about any insecurities I might have, have nothing to do with knowing how to dress appropriately to be a role model for children. If you want to be treated like a professional and be respected, dress like it! Stop trying to look like one of the children, and PLEASE look in the mirror, you can't fit a size 14 in a size 8 or ten. Not pretty......
And I have very good friends who happen to be Japanese? So that makes me an expert? When did the way someone dresses become an indicator of teaching ability? To be honest I wouldn't mind uniforms for teachers and students alike, but I don't think that is the main issue. Red herring maybe, but not an issue. I also think accountability is a good thing for all. Accountability is great. But placing 100% accountability on the teacher is a mistake when there is so little the teacher has control over. In a perfect world teachers would teach a strong curriculum to well rested, well fed, well disciplined students who are self motivated. But it's not a perfect world. If your child is falling behind what are you doing about it? What is your child doing about it? You talk about teachers pointing fingers but it looks like you're doing plenty of that yourself. Teaching a child is a team job. You should be more worried about doing your part because trust me, the teachers are doing theirs.
Looked

Butler, TN

#182 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
And I have very good friends who happen to be Japanese? So that makes me an expert? When did the way someone dresses become an indicator of teaching ability? To be honest I wouldn't mind uniforms for teachers and students alike, but I don't think that is the main issue. Red herring maybe, but not an issue. I also think accountability is a good thing for all. Accountability is great. But placing 100% accountability on the teacher is a mistake when there is so little the teacher has control over. In a perfect world teachers would teach a strong curriculum to well rested, well fed, well disciplined students who are self motivated. But it's not a perfect world. If your child is falling behind what are you doing about it? What is your child doing about it? You talk about teachers pointing fingers but it looks like you're doing plenty of that yourself. Teaching a child is a team job. You should be more worried about doing your part because trust me, the teachers are doing theirs.
We can agree that educating children takes more than the teacher. But just as you say all parents aren't doing their part( which is true), certainly all teachers aren't doing theirs either either. Your friend being Japanese doesn't make you an expert, it makes her one!
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#183 Jun 29, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>We can agree that educating children takes more than the teacher. But just as you say all parents aren't doing their part( which is true), certainly all teachers aren't doing theirs either either. Your friend being Japanese doesn't make you an expert, it makes her one!
That was the point I was trying to make. Knowing a "friend" who once lived in Japan does not make you an expert. There may be teachers who don't do their part, but trust me, those are the exceptions. Your rants would be more productive if you focused on parents who don't teach their children to respect authority and don't teach their children the value of hard work. I believe with all my heart bad parenting is harder to overcome than bad teaching.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#184 Jun 29, 2014
anyone wrote:
<quoted text>
Banjo Knees and KAT sure do think alike don't they? Anyone else notice about their locations too? Yeah, hard to fool all the people all the time.
Really? And you got that from our locations did you? You are good! Really good!
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#185 Jun 29, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
That was the point I was trying to make. Knowing a "friend" who once lived in Japan does not make you an expert. There may be teachers who don't do their part, but trust me, those are the exceptions. Your rants would be more productive if you focused on parents who don't teach their children to respect authority and don't teach their children the value of hard work. I believe with all my heart bad parenting is harder to overcome than bad teaching.
Bad and good teaching is subjective. My oldest had a math teacher at one time that I was thrilled with. I was relieved when my second had the same teacher. It turned out to be a terrible year for him. I met with the teacher on several occasions, even had a meeting with the teacher and principal. No improvement. I ended up paying my neighbor to tutor him. I'm not sure what the difference was but whatever had worked for my oldest certainly did not work for him. A good parent can overcome bad teaching but a good teacher, as much as he may want to, cannot overcome bad parenting.
anyone

Greeneville, TN

#186 Jun 30, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
That was the point I was trying to make. Knowing a "friend" who once lived in Japan does not make you an expert. There may be teachers who don't do their part, but trust me, those are the exceptions. Your rants would be more productive if you focused on parents who don't teach their children to respect authority and don't teach their children the value of hard work. I believe with all my heart bad parenting is harder to overcome than bad teaching.
Banjo Knees, KAT or whatever you are calling yourself today, whether you want to come down to earth and accept reality, our school system has many unqualified teachers in the classroom. I disagree with your analysis that the teachers not doing their part are the exceptions. Unfortunately, more and more teachers are entering the classroom because of the absence of high standards when hiring. When I was a student at a local high school, I had a teacher who taught for three years and then left. Eventually, we found out that they were not re-hired because they failed a test which they had been given three years to try and pass. Now if that is not ludicrous, I don't know what is. The Tennessee Department of Education needs to get an ear full of how many teachers are being hired into positions they have no training in and then just maybe the road to better teachers could begin.
anyone

Greeneville, TN

#187 Jun 30, 2014
Kat wrote:
<quoted text>
Really? And you got that from our locations did you? You are good! Really good!
You have been outed. Hey, it happens.
Looked

Butler, TN

#188 Jun 30, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
That was the point I was trying to make. Knowing a "friend" who once lived in Japan does not make you an expert. There may be teachers who don't do their part, but trust me, those are the exceptions. Your rants would be more productive if you focused on parents who don't teach their children to respect authority and don't teach their children the value of hard work. I believe with all my heart bad parenting is harder to overcome than bad teaching.
That was my original point- my friend, not you knew more about living in Japan. Your right, it should be much easier than it is to "overcome" bad teaching, they should be fired( but aren't) education sure takes care of its own. They just move the bad ones around. I bet most every parent on here knows one that's been done that way. I know good teachers would appreciate getting rid of the inadequate teachers too. All they do is make their job harder.
There are bad parents out there. But most care very much about their children and their education. Your parenting excuse is inadequate to explain why most children aren't learning at an average pace.
Looked

Butler, TN

#189 Jun 30, 2014
Kat wrote:
<quoted text>
Bad and good teaching is subjective. My oldest had a math teacher at one time that I was thrilled with. I was relieved when my second had the same teacher. It turned out to be a terrible year for him. I met with the teacher on several occasions, even had a meeting with the teacher and principal. No improvement. I ended up paying my neighbor to tutor him. I'm not sure what the difference was but whatever had worked for my oldest certainly did not work for him. A good parent can overcome bad teaching but a good teacher, as much as he may want to, cannot overcome bad parenting.
That's because you and some educators will never let go of this excuse when you're not getting the job done as a teacher. Whether you or your spouse is a teacher...... Doesn't mater, you have to hang on to that excuse when most of our children can't read.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#190 Jun 30, 2014
anyone wrote:
<quoted text>
Banjo Knees, KAT or whatever you are calling yourself today, whether you want to come down to earth and accept reality, our school system has many unqualified teachers in the classroom. I disagree with your analysis that the teachers not doing their part are the exceptions. Unfortunately, more and more teachers are entering the classroom because of the absence of high standards when hiring. When I was a student at a local high school, I had a teacher who taught for three years and then left. Eventually, we found out that they were not re-hired because they failed a test which they had been given three years to try and pass. Now if that is not ludicrous, I don't know what is. The Tennessee Department of Education needs to get an ear full of how many teachers are being hired into positions they have no training in and then just maybe the road to better teachers could begin.
I can only testify to the teachers I have come into contact with while my children have been in school. Yes, while there have been a few that I disagreed with, for the most part I found teachers who were willing to go the extra mile for their students. I have been impressed with the hard work they put in. It is a job that I wouldn't do for any amount of money. At one time I thought I would like to pursue a career in teaching, but not at this time. Or at least not in this town. If what you are saying is correct, that the "bad teachers" are not the exception, then maybe it is because the level of pay that is offered in Greene County? I can't imagine why someone would teach in the county when they can teach in the city for about $4,000-$5,000 more a year and with better benefits. Or work in Johnson City for about a $10,000. That is a commute I would consider. I would say that would make the teachers in the county either highly dedicated, or the perhaps they are the "leftovers" that cannot get hired in the city or neighboring districts. Maybe my children were lucky and got those dedicated ones. Definitely something to consider.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#191 Jun 30, 2014
anyone wrote:
<quoted text>
You have been outed. Hey, it happens.
Oh my! You do provide good comic relief. It would seem you cannot keep up with the arguments so you must toss out another red herring to throw the hoards reading this thread off course. Perhaps it is you who should be outed. I am Kat. That is all. But if it makes you feel better about yourself, l will allow you to keep thinking that. It won't change anything.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#192 Jun 30, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>That's because you and some educators will never let go of this excuse when you're not getting the job done as a teacher. Whether you or your spouse is a teacher...... Doesn't mater, you have to hang on to that excuse when most of our children can't read.
This post proves my above point.
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#193 Jun 30, 2014
anyone wrote:
<quoted text>
You have been outed. Hey, it happens.
Way to go! You showed her! She deserves to be outed for stealing my topix identity.
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#194 Jun 30, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>That's because you and some educators will never let go of this excuse when you're not getting the job done as a teacher. Whether you or your spouse is a teacher...... Doesn't mater, you have to hang on to that excuse when most of our children can't read.
so what you are saying is that you believe the education of a child is the sole responsibility of teachers? And that poor nutrition (too much fast food), poor discipline, inadequate rest, and no help with homework has no effect on a child? I think the studies beg to differ. Why do you think the schools with the highest poverty levels as a rule have the lowest test scores? Why is it that within the school system the students who are on free or reduced lunch score lower? You can check these results on the state of Tennessee's webpage. Let me give you a hint. The answer is that there is more to teaching than meets the eye. Only the fool will jump to the simplest conclusion before considering all the factors. Greene County has a high obesity rate. That must be prove that we have terrible doctors!
banjo knees

Candler, NC

#195 Jun 30, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text> That was my original point- my friend, not you knew more about living in Japan. Your right, it should be much easier than it is to "overcome" bad teaching, they should be fired( but aren't) education sure takes care of its own. They just move the bad ones around. I bet most every parent on here knows one that's been done that way. I know good teachers would appreciate getting rid of the inadequate teachers too. All they do is make their job harder.
There are bad parents out there. But most care very much about their children and their education. Your parenting excuse is inadequate to explain why most children aren't learning at an average pace.
MY parenting excuse? I find your bad teacher excuse equally old. And lazy. Ok you might want to grab a pencil here because I'm about to give you several factors that influence a child's learning that you haven't considered. It is agreed upon that the number one factor is socio-economic status. Another big factor is parent's education. Affluent parents have access to more educational resources. Educated parents are more likely to directly or indirectly educate their own children. It is also more likely that they will have higher educational expectations for their children. Resources available to a school. Some schools have a greater number of primary aids, lower student/teacher ratio, more parent volunteers, access to better curriculum, etc. A child's own learning disabilities also play a factor in his progress as does self motivation and desire to learn. Some kids are like sponges and soak up everything, others prefer to sit and play video games all day. This could be a direct result of poor parenting. And lastly, the teacher's level of expertise, education, and willingness to help students. Student learning is a multi-faceted system. If a factor is missing, but others are in place, the student will learn. But we can be lazy and blame it all on the teacher.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Greeneville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
KFC under new management? 8 min Zzzz 9
How is it working at So Pak Co??? 15 min Shane game 4
Sharia law is a damnation folks 43 min Country boy 1
Is every woman a drug addict? 1 hr Eat Ships 10
lol west greene vs. greeneville 1 hr GreeneCo 34
The Alphabet game 4 hr Kohlrabi 4
lawsuit against county schools 5 hr John 8
Mayor Daniels tries to pull Fast one 9 hr Janet 10
Body found in Greeneville creek 11 hr Fishing Man 7
Scintillaire Restaurant 16 hr atethere 25
Greene County Schools Wed watching the news 115
Greeneville Dating
Find my Match

Greeneville Jobs

Greeneville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Greeneville News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Greeneville

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]