School Board Budget $46.8M! Will resu...
Maybe

Johnson City, TN

#44 Jun 4, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>uh, has anyone driven through the staff parking lots at our schools lately? Uh, you'll see some pretty expensive wheels there. My kid says his teacher is on her personal cellphone during class all the time....
If that's happening, it should be brought to the principal's attention. We did have a handful of teachers on cell phones during class, so new rules for staff we're put in place. It helps to have principals who spend time visiting classrooms, not just for scheduled observations. Doesn't take many drop-in visits to see who's doing what they're supposed to be doing, and who's dead weight.

Honestly, with the stakes being so high as far as testing goes, most teachers are trying to use every minute of class time to do their job--teach.

I really have a hard time with the "us vs. them" mentality some parents and teachers have. We all want what's best for our kids, let's support each other and show some mutual respect.
Maybe

Johnson City, TN

#45 Jun 4, 2014
Maybe wrote:
<quoted text>If that's happening, it should be brought to the principal's attention. We did have a handful of teachers on cell phones during class, so new rules for staff we're put in place. It helps to have principals who spend time visiting classrooms, not just for scheduled observations. Doesn't take many drop-in visits to see who's doing what they're supposed to be doing, and who's dead weight.

Honestly, with the stakes being so high as far as testing goes, most teachers are trying to use every minute of class time to do their job--teach.

I really have a hard time with the "us vs. them" mentality some parents and teachers have. We all want what's best for our kids, let's support each other and show some mutual respect.
That should say new rules were put in place, sorry for the autocorrect.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#46 Jun 4, 2014
doctor wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! def some bipolar detected in this post!
mask the truth anyway you want to.lol the truth is painful.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#47 Jun 4, 2014
Maybe wrote:
<quoted text>
If that's happening, it should be brought to the principal's attention. We did have a handful of teachers on cell phones during class, so new rules for staff we're put in place. It helps to have principals who spend time visiting classrooms, not just for scheduled observations. Doesn't take many drop-in visits to see who's doing what they're supposed to be doing, and who's dead weight.
Honestly, with the stakes being so high as far as testing goes, most teachers are trying to use every minute of class time to do their job--teach.
I really have a hard time with the "us vs. them" mentality some parents and teachers have. We all want what's best for our kids, let's support each other and show some mutual respect.
Thanks for the info. I don't know if there are any consequences for this in our system. I will talk to the principal and try to see if there is a cellphone policy for employees .

The stakes are very high for everyone involved. Parents get tired of getting beaten up by teachers too. I don't know of a place in this conversation, or any other, that I've seen on this site where a teacher speaks positively about parents. Mutual respect would be refreshing.
doctor

Charlotte, NC

#48 Jun 4, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>mask the truth anyway you want to.lol the truth is painful.
that's something it seems that you are finding out on a daily occasion! Take some meds for those anger issues. You haven't been able to write a post without attacking someone. No one is out to hurt you or your kids. If you don't like teachers in your kids school, leave. There are other schools. You can also home school.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#49 Jun 4, 2014
doctor wrote:
<quoted text>
that's something it seems that you are finding out on a daily occasion! Take some meds for those anger issues. You haven't been able to write a post without attacking someone. No one is out to hurt you or your kids. If you don't like teachers in your kids school, leave. There are other schools. You can also home school.
no, I won't have you or any other educator tell me I have to, or should take my kids somewhere else or home school if I speak up about deficient teachers or conditions. School systems need to make sure our children have excellent teachers and administrators. The inadequate employees should GO. Pay your good employees more. I am a taxpayer, and should be able to send my children to our community school.
The delusional one is you, you're probably not a good teacher either.
banjo knees

Charlotte, NC

#50 Jun 4, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>no, I won't have you or any other educator tell me I have to, or should take my kids somewhere else or home school if I speak up about deficient teachers or conditions. School systems need to make sure our children have excellent teachers and administrators. The inadequate employees should GO. Pay your good employees more. I am a taxpayer, and should be able to send my children to our community school.
The delusional one is you, you're probably not a good teacher either.
I see a parallel here. You were complaining about teachers in your child's school, yet when someone suggest you move your kids you get defensive. I see your point in that. Now maybe the next time a teacher points out injustices in their jobs you won't be so quick to suggest they find another job. Maybe they don't want to find another job, but just want the problems in their system fixed.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#51 Jun 4, 2014
banjo knees wrote:
<quoted text>
I see a parallel here. You were complaining about teachers in your child's school, yet when someone suggest you move your kids you get defensive. I see your point in that. Now maybe the next time a teacher points out injustices in their jobs you won't be so quick to suggest they find another job. Maybe they don't want to find another job, but just want the problems in their system fixed.
Parents should be able to send their children to their community school and know that every employee there is highly qualified for their job. At my workplace if you don't perform, you get fired. Period. My children are required to attend school. I am taxed to help pay for that.
The problem is that you have the employee(teacher) trying to tell the employer ( taxpayer) what they are or aren't going to do. That wouldn't work a day at other businesses. Let me go in to work tomorrow and tell my employer that if you don't like how I produce, then you can just find another business or go home I'd be fired before I finished my sentence. It's not the same thing.....
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#52 Jun 4, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>Parents should be able to send their children to their community school and know that every employee there is highly qualified for their job. At my workplace if you don't perform, you get fired. Period. My children are required to attend school. I am taxed to help pay for that.
The problem is that you have the employee(teacher) trying to tell the employer ( taxpayer) what they are or aren't going to do. That wouldn't work a day at other businesses. Let me go in to work tomorrow and tell my employer that if you don't like how I produce, then you can just find another business or go home I'd be fired before I finished my sentence. It's not the same thing.....
Here is the problem as I see it, you are forgetting that teachers (employees) are also tax payers (employers). You speak of your "workplace". I am rather curious to know what workplace that would be or if you actually pay any taxes at all. You may not realize this but your children are not required to attend a public school. You are within your rights to homeschool if you do not feel the schools are up to your standards. If you think teachers have it so easy, have such great pay and benefits, become one. My guess is you wouldn't last a day.
True

Johnson City, TN

#53 Jun 5, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>Parents should be able to send their children to their community school and know that every employee there is highly qualified for their job. At my workplace if you don't perform, you get fired. Period. My children are required to attend school. I am taxed to help pay for that.
The problem is that you have the employee(teacher) trying to tell the employer ( taxpayer) what they are or aren't going to do. That wouldn't work a day at other businesses. Let me go in to work tomorrow and tell my employer that if you don't like how I produce, then you can just find another business or go home I'd be fired before I finished my sentence. It's not the same thing.....
You absolutely should expect that 100% of the teachers at your child's school are highly qualified; some districts have their schools post that information on their website.

It's hard to compare the educational world to the corporate world. They just don't work the same. At your job, you are probably responsible for performing your required tasks and your success depends on how well you, as an individual, do. Teachers do all we can do at school, but in order for your children to truly succeed, we need active and involved parents. Part of our success depends on the home life of students.

Work with your child at home, read to them, take them to the library over the summer, check their homework and read the newsletters sent home. There are many, many parents who are doing these things, and more. Sometimes it's another family member who steps in to help out.

In a perfect world, we wouldn't have such low attendance rates, which directly affect test scores and graduation rates. I realize this goes both ways; I just read an article about teacher absenteeism that really shocked me!

In no way am I trying to put parents down, just trying to look at both sides, while hoping there didn't have to be "sides." Again, mutual respect goes a long way.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#54 Jun 5, 2014
Kat wrote:
<quoted text>
Here is the problem as I see it, you are forgetting that teachers (employees) are also tax payers (employers). You speak of your "workplace". I am rather curious to know what workplace that would be or if you actually pay any taxes at all. You may not realize this but your children are not required to attend a public school. You are within your rights to homeschool if you do not feel the schools are up to your standards. If you think teachers have it so easy, have such great pay and benefits, become one. My guess is you wouldn't last a day.
I guess as an employer( taxpayer) your standards aren't as high as most private employers. Otherwise you would demand excellent standards in all areas of education( the employee- teacher) if you're one. I work almost half a year to pay my taxes and we only have a 401k plan for retirement. My workplace doesn't even match what I put in to it.
Children are required to go to school. Yes, I could homeschool or send them to a private school, and I will as soon as there are vouchers. Then when I take my children out of public schools I will take my tax dollars(PPE) with me. Right now that doesn't happen. School choice will make for healthy competition.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#55 Jun 5, 2014
True wrote:
<quoted text>
You absolutely should expect that 100% of the teachers at your child's school are highly qualified; some districts have their schools post that information on their website.
It's hard to compare the educational world to the corporate world. They just don't work the same. At your job, you are probably responsible for performing your required tasks and your success depends on how well you, as an individual, do. Teachers do all we can do at school, but in order for your children to truly succeed, we need active and involved parents. Part of our success depends on the home life of students.
Work with your child at home, read to them, take them to the library over the summer, check their homework and read the newsletters sent home. There are many, many parents who are doing these things, and more. Sometimes it's another family member who steps in to help out.
In a perfect world, we wouldn't have such low attendance rates, which directly affect test scores and graduation rates. I realize this goes both ways; I just read an article about teacher absenteeism that really shocked me!
In no way am I trying to put parents down, just trying to look at both sides, while hoping there didn't have to be "sides." Again, mutual respect goes a long way.
thank you.
drug tested

Greeneville, TN

#56 Jun 6, 2014
Teachers need to be drug tested without prior warning people. This is being discussed some now. Better late than never.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#57 Jun 7, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>I guess as an employer( taxpayer) your standards aren't as high as most private employers. Otherwise you would demand excellent standards in all areas of education( the employee- teacher) if you're one. I work almost half a year to pay my taxes and we only have a 401k plan for retirement. My workplace doesn't even match what I put in to it.
Children are required to go to school. Yes, I could homeschool or send them to a private school, and I will as soon as there are vouchers. Then when I take my children out of public schools I will take my tax dollars(PPE) with me. Right now that doesn't happen. School choice will make for healthy competition.
My standards are probably higher than most private employers. I think what the other poster was trying to say, if you read her entire post (you thanked her for it), is that the private business sector cannot be compared to public education. Please reread the post again. You may be enlightened. And FYI the voucher system will likely not help most children. You see, if a private school chooses to accept vouchers, that school will have a say in the children it will accept, and which children it will not. You can bet that these schools will not accept students with special needs or students with behavior problems. These schools will also be hiring teachers and where do you think those teachers will come from? Public schools teachers will be flocking to these jobs to get out from under that state and federal bureaucracy that is ruining public schools today. Also, to get the best teachers, these schools will need to offer better wages and benefits, which will mean they will raise tuition. So those waivers will only cover part of the cost. School choice will make for healthy competition. That much we can agree on. But will everything else, I think you will get an education yourself. You get what you pay for. Think it through.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#58 Jun 8, 2014
Kat wrote:
<quoted text>
My standards are probably higher than most private employers. I think what the other poster was trying to say, if you read her entire post (you thanked her for it), is that the private business sector cannot be compared to public education. Please reread the post again. You may be enlightened. And FYI the voucher system will likely not help most children. You see, if a private school chooses to accept vouchers, that school will have a say in the children it will accept, and which children it will not. You can bet that these schools will not accept students with special needs or students with behavior problems. These schools will also be hiring teachers and where do you think those teachers will come from? Public schools teachers will be flocking to these jobs to get out from under that state and federal bureaucracy that is ruining public schools today. Also, to get the best teachers, these schools will need to offer better wages and benefits, which will mean they will raise tuition. So those waivers will only cover part of the cost. School choice will make for healthy competition. That much we can agree on. But will everything else, I think you will get an education yourself. You get what you pay for. Think it through.
I'm sorry, these excuses are so old. I think vouchers will be offered to everyone someday. Not just select groups of children. Then private schools can take more students, have more money and be able to offer special needs children what they need because parents can take their tax dollars to those schools. They won't be controlled by the union where salaries and benefits take most of the high educational dollars spent on schools. More will go directly to the kids. Unions have done to education what they've done to the auto and postal business......given less and less service to pay for Cadillac benefits. Now they're broke. I don't know what the answer is to better educating more of our children, but I think most people would agree what we're doing isn't getting it done. It would be nice for all of the adults to come round the table, set all agendas aside, and reslly
put the children first !
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#59 Jun 8, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>I'm sorry, these excuses are so old. I think vouchers will be offered to everyone someday. Not just select groups of children. Then private schools can take more students, have more money and be able to offer special needs children what they need because parents can take their tax dollars to those schools. They won't be controlled by the union where salaries and benefits take most of the high educational dollars spent on schools. More will go directly to the kids. Unions have done to education what they've done to the auto and postal business......given less and less service to pay for Cadillac benefits. Now they're broke. I don't know what the answer is to better educating more of our children, but I think most people would agree what we're doing isn't getting it done. It would be nice for all of the adults to come round the table, set all agendas aside, and reslly
put the children first !
We can agree on unions. I am not a fan of unions. And I agree that vouchers have a potential to change education in a positive way. But will that happen? What we don't agree on is the effect vouchers will have on schools. I think they will be a great thing for teachers. For profit schools will start popping up everywhere. To attract the best teachers these school will offer good benefits and salaries. Teachers will flock to these schools to get away from public school bureaucracy. It is common sense. In the long run will it help students? Perhaps. However, competition will be the driving force. Scores, scores, scores. These schools will have the choice of which students they will take. Do you think they will accept any student who has the potential to cause problems? To be considered one of the "best" schools, they will only accept the "best" students. Then they can raise tuition. Get better teachers. Your voucher will end up paying only a portion of tuition. Yes, I can see vouchers being a great thing for teachers. Students? That will remain to be seen.
Looked

Jonesborough, TN

#60 Jun 8, 2014
Kat wrote:
<quoted text>
We can agree on unions. I am not a fan of unions. And I agree that vouchers have a potential to change education in a positive way. But will that happen? What we don't agree on is the effect vouchers will have on schools. I think they will be a great thing for teachers. For profit schools will start popping up everywhere. To attract the best teachers these school will offer good benefits and salaries. Teachers will flock to these schools to get away from public school bureaucracy. It is common sense. In the long run will it help students? Perhaps. However, competition will be the driving force. Scores, scores, scores. These schools will have the choice of which students they will take. Do you think they will accept any student who has the potential to cause problems? To be considered one of the "best" schools, they will only accept the "best" students. Then they can raise tuition. Get better teachers. Your voucher will end up paying only a portion of tuition. Yes, I can see vouchers being a great thing for teachers. Students? That will remain to be seen.
I'm willing to give vouchers to anyone that wants them, because what we're doing isn't working. Education is so trendy, ie. CommonCore, and all this technology( that's dumbing down our children). Technology has it's place, but we forget, it's only a tool ( not the be all, end all). Tennessee is always behind the times, you'd think we just discovered technology. All you hear from educators, administrators etc is we need more technology. Any preschooler can learn how to use a computer. We need to use our brains! I pray for our children's sake we can get education right soon.
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#61 Jun 9, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>I'm willing to give vouchers to anyone that wants them, because what we're doing isn't working. Education is so trendy, ie. CommonCore, and all this technology( that's dumbing down our children). Technology has it's place, but we forget, it's only a tool ( not the be all, end all). Tennessee is always behind the times, you'd think we just discovered technology. All you hear from educators, administrators etc is we need more technology. Any preschooler can learn how to use a computer. We need to use our brains! I pray for our children's sake we can get education right soon.
I am including a link to an article about vouchers. Whether you like them or do not, it is still a good article to read as it makes many good points. Some of these points are some I tried to get across to you. The article also contains many that I had not thought of. It is an eye-opening article. Vouchers, on the surface, seem like a godsend. But I'm afraid, after closer scrutiny they may not appear to be the answer they seem. It is almost certain teachers will profit from them. And business men. Perhaps some students. But the special needs and disadvantaged will not, although some think they will. All I can say is read the article.

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/special_repo...
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#62 Jun 9, 2014
I am providing a link for one more article on school vouchers written by Diane Ravitch. Ms. Ravitch was once a big supporter of school choice and vouchers as she worked for George Bush. After several years of studying the issue she has since changed her stance. This is what intrigued me to read her blog. I was also a big supporter of school vouchers. I wanted to send my children to private schools when they were smaller, but I could not afford to. Ms. Ravitch's writing caused me to rethink my position. Once again, I can see the potential benefit for school vouchers, but I can also see potential harm. I am not completely sold on them.

http://dianeravitch.net/2013/03/29/vouchers-d...
Kat

Johnson City, TN

#63 Jun 9, 2014
Looked wrote:
<quoted text>I'm willing to give vouchers to anyone that wants them, because what we're doing isn't working. Education is so trendy, ie. CommonCore, and all this technology( that's dumbing down our children). Technology has it's place, but we forget, it's only a tool ( not the be all, end all). Tennessee is always behind the times, you'd think we just discovered technology. All you hear from educators, administrators etc is we need more technology. Any preschooler can learn how to use a computer. We need to use our brains! I pray for our children's sake we can get education right soon.
I am surprised that you do not see that vouchers are also a trend, much like Common Core. In fact some of the same people who poured their money into Common Core are also behind the push for the voucher system.(The Walton Foundation and The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation).

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