The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#21 Mar 14, 2013
President John Adams and the U.S. Senate in 1797:

“[T]he government of the United States of America is not founded in any sense on the Christian religion....”(From “The Treaty with Tripoli,” approved by President Adams and unanimously ratified by the Senate.)
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#22 Mar 14, 2013
“I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should ‘make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,’ thus building a wall of separation between church and State.”

President Thomas Jefferson
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#23 Mar 14, 2013
“Strongly guarded ... is the separation between religion and government in the Constitution of the United States....”

President James Madison (“Father of the Constitution” and principal author of the First Amendment):
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#24 Mar 14, 2013
President Andrew Jackson:

“I could not do otherwise without transcending the limits prescribed by the Constitution for the President and without feeling that I might in some degree disturb the security which religion nowadays enjoys in this country in its complete separation from the political concerns of the General Government.”(Statement declining to proclaim a national day of prayer and fasting.)
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#25 Mar 14, 2013
President Ulysses S. Grant:

“Leave the matter of religion to the family altar, the church and the private school supported entirely by private contributions. Keep the church and state forever separate.”
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#26 Mar 14, 2013
President Franklin D. Roosevelt:

“The traditional Jeffersonian principle of religious freedom was so broadly democratic that it included the right to have no religion at all – it gave to the individual the right to worship any God he chose or no god.”
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#27 Mar 15, 2013
President Lyndon B. Johnson:

“I believe in the American tradition of separation of church and state which is expressed in the First Amendment to the Constitution. By my office – and by personal conviction – I am sworn to uphold that tradition.”
LOST

Baltimore, MD

#28 Mar 15, 2013
The Quoter wrote:
President John Adams and the U.S. Senate in 1797:
“[T]he government of the United States of America is not founded in any sense on the Christian religion....”(From “The Treaty with Tripoli,” approved by President Adams and unanimously ratified by the Senate.)
This was actually a misquote translated from an Aribic version of this Treaty. This was put in there becauase the people the Treaty was signed with were a Theocracy, and wouldn't have signed the Treaty otherwise. It was a political move. Google is your friend.
LOST

Baltimore, MD

#29 Mar 15, 2013
The Quoter wrote:
President Andrew Jackson:
“I could not do otherwise without transcending the limits prescribed by the Constitution for the President and without feeling that I might in some degree disturb the security which religion nowadays enjoys in this country in its complete separation from the political concerns of the General Government.”(Statement declining to proclaim a national day of prayer and fasting.)
This is actually a response that is saying that by not allowing the Government to control religion, that religion is free and secure to be practiced how and when a person wants to. It was an effort to make sure that government didn't take over religion, and has nothing to do with displays on public property.
The Quoter

Johnson City, TN

#30 Mar 15, 2013
Governmental displays of the Commandments unfair to minority religions
Because of the religious views contained in the Ten Commandments, displaying the Decalogue on public buildings would send a message of official disapproval to religions that reject those views.

Government would effectively be labeling minority religions as having false, inferior, and even unpatriotic religious beliefs. As a result, their adherents would be viewed as second-class citizens.

Besides being highly offensive, that treatment is a prescription for intolerance and persecution. Throughout history, refusing to support a state-established religion was often considered not only irreverent but treasonous.

This was because opposing the government’s religion was the same as opposing the government. Punishment was meted out accordingly by either the government or private persons.
The Quoter

Johnson City, TN

#31 Mar 15, 2013
Founders wanted governmental neutrality toward religion.
Such divisiveness has the potential to cause horrendous evil. It’s a reason the Founding Fathers provided in the Constitution that government shall be neutral concerning religion.
They knew that throughout history, governmental involvement in religion had caused millions to be killed in conflicts over whose religious beliefs should be supported or opposed by the government.
In fact, much persecution occurred in Europe precisely over the meaning of the ban on worshipping a “graven image.”
Besides disputes over which version of the Ten Commandments should be promoted by government, the religious diversity of today’s America could result in conflicts over whose sacred texts should have the same privilege.
It’s entirely possible that some persons would argue for display of the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, the Five Pillars of Islam, the Wiccan Rede, or the Affirmations of Humanism. Others would surely argue to the contrary.
Keeping religion and government separate, as the Founders intended, prevents these conflicts
The Quoter

Johnson City, TN

#32 Mar 15, 2013
The people making the most sense on this issue are those who apply the Golden Rule taught by many religions and philosophies. Unlike the Ten Commandments, it truly does “transcend religious differences.”

Those persons know they would be offended if government promoted religious beliefs they disagree with. So they don’t want the government promoting their religious views, because they realize others would be similarly offended.

It’s curious that more religious people don’t adopt this position, since the Golden Rule is supposedly one of the most important tenets of many religions.

It’s even more curious in view of the fact that church-state separation is one of the most important tenets on which the U.S. was founded.

Any position required by both the Golden Rule and the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution deserves the strongest support.
LOST

Baltimore, MD

#33 Mar 15, 2013
The Quoter wrote:
The people making the most sense on this issue are those who apply the Golden Rule taught by many religions and philosophies. Unlike the Ten Commandments, it truly does “transcend religious differences.”
Those persons know they would be offended if government promoted religious beliefs they disagree with. So they don’t want the government promoting their religious views, because they realize others would be similarly offended.
It’s curious that more religious people don’t adopt this position, since the Golden Rule is supposedly one of the most important tenets of many religions.
It’s even more curious in view of the fact that church-state separation is one of the most important tenets on which the U.S. was founded.
Any position required by both the Golden Rule and the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution deserves the strongest support.
So the answer to all of this is exactly what I had said before, we should shrug our shoulders at whatever is displayed and go on with our lives instead of pissing ourselves and getting lawyers involved. Too many people are "Offended" by too many things now days, and the push to be so PC is what causes the divisions in this country, not public displays of whatever religious symbols (or lack thereof)might be on a courthouse in some small town that doesn't really have any effect on anyone else. What needs to happen is that we stop trying to legislate morality, and stop being so soft-skinned. I've been to plenty of places that had Stars of David, and many other symbols of religions that I don't practice, but you know what? I wasn't offended, not because I believe what they do, but because I'm not some Namby that wants to go cry to the ACLU everytime something I don't agree with is displayed.
The Quoter

Travelers Rest, SC

#34 Mar 15, 2013
Much simpler to not post religious symbols in government buildings in the first place and keep religion where it belongs. At home. Represent all religions for all US citizens or no religions. Its very simple.
LOST

Baltimore, MD

#35 Mar 15, 2013
The Quoter wrote:
Much simpler to not post religious symbols in government buildings in the first place and keep religion where it belongs. At home. Represent all religions for all US citizens or no religions. Its very simple.
But wouldn't that inhibit individuals within the Government from expressing their beliefs, and be in direct opposition to this part of the statute: "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." Not allowing displays of any and all religious (FSM included) displays is a prohibitation of free exercise of religion. Display of the 10 Commandments (misguided as it might be by many who don't understand the differences between the Covenants) no more pushes Chrisianity on someone than a Government official wearing a Burka would push Islam on that same person. A pissing match between Religious and Non-religioius is just that, a pissing match, and it is perpetrated by both sides when they are too soft-skinned to deal with the fact that there are opposing sides in every conflict. The easiest way to deal with it, is to simply ignore it, and go on with your life.
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#36 Mar 16, 2013
Obviously ignoring it will not work or we wouldn't be talking about it right now.

The history of governmentally established religion, both in England and in this country, showed that whenever government had allied itself with one particular form of religion, the inevitable result had been that it had incurred the hatred, disrespect and even contempt of those who held contrary beliefs.” Justice Hugo Black, for the majority, Engel v. Vitale (1962)
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#37 Mar 16, 2013
“When the government puts its imprimatur on a particular religion, it conveys a message of exclusion to all those who do not adhere to the favored beliefs. A government cannot be premised on the belief that all persons are created equal when it asserts that God prefers some.” Justice Harry Blackman, concurring opinion, Lee v. Weisman (1992)
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#38 Mar 16, 2013
“Thanks to the separation of church and state, you are in complete control of the religious upbringing of your children. Government institutions, including the public school system, are not permitted to coerce your children to adopt new and different religions.” Americans United for Separation of Church and State ( www.au.org )
The Quoter

Jonesborough, TN

#39 Mar 16, 2013
“The men and women who teach and administer public schools may not agree with my view of religion or Christianity. Furthermore, they are not trained in theology. Why on earth would I entrust them with any oversight of the religious life of my children?” Rev. Barry Lynn
Copper Still

Johnson City, TN

#40 Mar 16, 2013
My neighbor insists on mowing his yard on Sundays. Do we have to have a public stoning as prescribed in Leviticus, or can I kill him myself?

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