Dads are 'watchdogs' at school

Full story: WOOD-TV Grand Rapids and Michigan

Most every fifth grader has witnessed bullying. "Pushing us around," Jason Kissinger told 24 Hour News 8. "Calling us names like idiots and nerds and geeks." A bully Jason remembers as a big problem isn't at ...
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1 - 20 of 66 Comments Last updated Sep 13, 2008
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sully

Grandville, MI

#1 Sep 9, 2008
DOGS is at many school, and has been for a few years. I'm on 4 years and counting..... GO DOGS
former student

Novi, MI

#2 Sep 9, 2008
everyone needs a hug and a pat on the a** these days. heaven forbid we call someone a name. zeesh. my generation (class of 94) and all generations prior to that are fine, what is the difference now, other than the media blew columbine out of the water and every student that has followed that trend has gotten recognition also. i call my own kids nerds when goofing around, they are of sound mind and body. i can understand fighting is not needed but name calling-BIG DEAL! remember the saying---sticks and stones...
former student

Novi, MI

#3 Sep 9, 2008
also---do you think that kids that have their parents at school aren't going to get grief for that?!?!?! i can hear it already....
lennie

Grand Rapids, MI

#4 Sep 10, 2008
former student wrote:
also---do you think that kids that have their parents at school aren't going to get grief for that?!?!?! i can hear it already....
I can't express how sad you sound to me!
A parental presence in our kids' school is bad/embaressing for them? Are you the same guy that blames anti-social behavior on the public school system? Maybe if you were to get involved with your child's day to day schooling you could find some priceless opportunities to offer your child some guidance. You can have the most expensive school on the planet, but if the parents end up treating it like a "kiddie warehouse" it will never live up to its potential.
My kids were in such a small school with such a tiny budget that it relied on parental involvement to survive. The parents got to know their kids, their kids friends, and the parents of the other children. It was so common that it was absolutely natural to have the Moms and Dads roaming the halls.( I think it is referred to as a "COMMUNITY")

Give it a try before you criticize it so harshly....
lennie

Grand Rapids, MI

#5 Sep 10, 2008
former student wrote:
everyone needs a hug and a pat on the a** these days. heaven forbid we call someone a name. zeesh. my generation (class of 94) and all generations prior to that are fine, what is the difference now, other than the media blew columbine out of the water and every student that has followed that trend has gotten recognition also. i call my own kids nerds when goofing around, they are of sound mind and body. i can understand fighting is not needed but name calling-BIG DEAL! remember the saying---sticks and stones...
If you think "Idiot" or "nerd" or "geek" are the worst thing your kids are being called, you're crazy! And maybe your kids are not being bullied, but how do you know that your kids are not the bullies the other kids are talking about? Your dismissive attitude is very disturbing to me. As I recall, Columbine was a very affluent community. I am sure the parents all slept very well, thinking they had the good life going, assuring theselves that "it can't happen here!!"
Now Columbine is synonomous with senseless massacre.

I'm having a hard time walking away from this one, are there any school teachers out there? Am I being an alarmist?

Since: Nov 07

Manistee, MI

#6 Sep 10, 2008
times are different.
Fed up

United States

#7 Sep 10, 2008
Why do we wrap these kids in bubble wrap?....They had better learn to deal with bullies now then learning to deal with it as adults. Bullies are a part of the adult world just as much as when your school age. Theres not always someone there to step in and rescue you.
Four-eyes

Dearborn Heights, MI

#8 Sep 10, 2008
Why are parents having to do this?? The schools are responsible for providing security and guidance for the students. First they want parents to send in school supplies (that are required by law to be provided by the schools) and now the staff apparently does not want to get involved enforcing the school discipline regulations. What happens if you get an overly zealous DOGS that physically engages one of these "bullies" (how old are the kids, anyway??) Lawsuit time?? Time for the school staff to do their jobs, hire security if they have to, but golly, you are only dealing with KIDS, for God's sake....
A class of 94 student

Jackson, MI

#9 Sep 10, 2008
former student wrote:
everyone needs a hug and a pat on the a** these days. heaven forbid we call someone a name. zeesh. my generation (class of 94) and all generations prior to that are fine, what is the difference now, other than the media blew columbine out of the water and every student that has followed that trend has gotten recognition also. i call my own kids nerds when goofing around, they are of sound mind and body. i can understand fighting is not needed but name calling-BIG DEAL! remember the saying---sticks and stones...
if you think that this didn't happen back when we were in high school you're nuts. it sounds like you were one of the kids that made high school miserable for me. it's easy to say...sticks and stones....but when you go to school everyday and the only reason that someone talks to you it to berate you, it's unreal. I was one of the lucky ones, I had parents that cared enough to talk to me about it and be there for me. These kids need parent to show that they care and by these dads showing up in the classroom, they are doing just that. They are also providing a role model for those kids that don't have a good male role model to look up to. Your generation is not all fine. They are the parents of these kids that don't feel good enough about themselves, and feel that by bullying, name calling, and harrassing other kids they are making themselves to be in the "cool" crowd. Get a grip and learn some compassion!
KKC

Greenville, MI

#10 Sep 10, 2008
lennie wrote:
<quoted text>
If you think "Idiot" or "nerd" or "geek" are the worst thing your kids are being called, you're crazy! And maybe your kids are not being bullied, but how do you know that your kids are not the bullies the other kids are talking about? Your dismissive attitude is very disturbing to me. As I recall, Columbine was a very affluent community. I am sure the parents all slept very well, thinking they had the good life going, assuring theselves that "it can't happen here!!"
Now Columbine is synonomous with senseless massacre.
I'm having a hard time walking away from this one, are there any school teachers out there? Am I being an alarmist?
I teach at a middle school and I am continually disgusted at how mean kids can be. It is senseless and cruel. The reason people feel that "there are bullies in the adult world, so kids just better get used to it" is because this is a prevalent problem no one has ever attempted to prevent. I applaud these parents and programs with a standing ovation! Just because something has always been does not mean it needs to stay that way.
People who expect schools to "protect our kids" at all times are simply unreasonable. Bullies can be unbelievably sneaky at the times and places they choose to inflict their venom. Staff members can't be everywhere at every time and the bullies know this. I feel that type of education should start at home as I do with my own boys. Schools are too busy teaching the increasingly stringent benchmarks and standards mandated by the state and federal government with fewer time and resources in which to teach them. Let the parents into the school to help parent, and let teachers teach!

Since: Aug 07

Greater Grand Rapids

#11 Sep 10, 2008
A class of 94 student wrote:
<quoted text>
if you think that this didn't happen back when we were in high school you're nuts. it sounds like you were one of the kids that made high school miserable for me. it's easy to say...sticks and stones....but when you go to school everyday and the only reason that someone talks to you it to berate you, it's unreal. I was one of the lucky ones, I had parents that cared enough to talk to me about it and be there for me. These kids need parent to show that they care and by these dads showing up in the classroom, they are doing just that. They are also providing a role model for those kids that don't have a good male role model to look up to. Your generation is not all fine. They are the parents of these kids that don't feel good enough about themselves, and feel that by bullying, name calling, and harrassing other kids they are making themselves to be in the "cool" crowd. Get a grip and learn some compassion!
As a class of '96 graduate who now has school-age children of my own I have to second your opinion. But then again I am one of those parents in the class, on the field trip, in the office, in the lunchroom, in the copy room, I am one of those parents who take an active role in my childs' education. I am not in the classroom all the time, half the time my child doens't even know I have spent half the day at the school.
My own child is used to seeing me at the school, his friends are used to me being there. To them I am just a natural part of the day. I know my child's teacher, the administration, the other teachers, the children, my child's friends, their parents and the other parents.

What is wrong with being an involved parent?

Since: Aug 07

Greater Grand Rapids

#12 Sep 10, 2008
KKC wrote:
<quoted text>
Let the parents into the school to help parent, and let teachers teach!
Exactly.
lennie

Chicago, IL

#13 Sep 10, 2008
Fed up wrote:
Why do we wrap these kids in bubble wrap?....They had better learn to deal with bullies now then learning to deal with it as adults. Bullies are a part of the adult world just as much as when your school age. Theres not always someone there to step in and rescue you.
And you don't see where you being there would give you the ability to help your kids dealing with the bully?
You don't see you kids' problems as your problems?

Father of the year material, ain'tcha?
A class of 94 student

Jackson, MI

#14 Sep 10, 2008
welcome to GR wrote:
<quoted text>
As a class of '96 graduate who now has school-age children of my own I have to second your opinion. But then again I am one of those parents in the class, on the field trip, in the office, in the lunchroom, in the copy room, I am one of those parents who take an active role in my childs' education. I am not in the classroom all the time, half the time my child doens't even know I have spent half the day at the school.
My own child is used to seeing me at the school, his friends are used to me being there. To them I am just a natural part of the day. I know my child's teacher, the administration, the other teachers, the children, my child's friends, their parents and the other parents.
What is wrong with being an involved parent?
AMEN! Granted my kids aren't school age yet, they will be soon and I as well plan to be involved as much as I possibly can be. Working full time, it isn't going to be easy, but my kids are my priority...and if it means using my vacation time to be there....that's what I'm going to do.
Somebody in West Michigan

Detroit, MI

#15 Sep 10, 2008
In highschool, my mom worked at the school I went to. I always felt embarrassed. From middle school through my young adult years, I hated my parents and still don't like my dad. I tolerate my mom. A lot of parents hover over their children and shelter them too much. Kids bully for a variety of reasons. I also believe it starts from home too.
turdshooter

Brunswick, OH

#16 Sep 10, 2008
Fed up wrote:
Why do we wrap these kids in bubble wrap?....They had better learn to deal with bullies now then learning to deal with it as adults. Bullies are a part of the adult world just as much as when your school age. Theres not always someone there to step in and rescue you.
if kids were just calling each other names or fighting behind school, we wouldnt have to wrap them in bubble wrap. it is time you came out of your cave and see that bullying leads to bigger issues.

i'll bet you were a big bully to kids who were smarter and raised with more class than you, and i'll bet you continue to be a bully as an adult.
Knappmom

Grand Rapids, MI

#17 Sep 10, 2008
Volunteering is highly recommended at all the Charter schools, and usually that request is picked up by the moms or grandmas of the students; the DOGS program increases male involvement in the school on a daily basis. It's impressive to see how well the students act when a DAD is around! I applaud Mrs. Deveney in her efforts to help the students in our school have a positive learning environment.
lennie

Chicago, IL

#18 Sep 10, 2008
KKC wrote:
<quoted text>
Schools are too busy teaching the increasingly stringent benchmarks and standards mandated by the state and federal government with fewer time and resources in which to teach them. Let the parents into the school to help parent, and let teachers teach!
Thank you for saying it much better than I was able to. I would not want to be at the school as an enforcer of some sort, and I would not some other untrained individual as an enforcer of my kids. I was never at the school to fight my kids' battles in any way. I just feel that being involved with the school can be very rewarding for both the students and the parents. Go on a field trip, assist a coach, join in a fundraiser.... just show some sign that you care.
Sunshine

Grand Rapids, MI

#19 Sep 10, 2008
I have gone to visit my sons school 4 times and let me tell you the kids love it. When I am there my son says he has more people that hang out with him that would not normally hang out with him. We are usually surrounded by about 15 kids. I get hugs from the kids when I walk in the door. This is when he was in the third fourth and fifth grades so not all kids will catch grief when a parent comes to the school. I am also an active volunteer in my daughter's school and I see the same reaction from her clasmates and friends. I do not go to protect my children (unless needed)I go as an active parent and I give all the children the respect they deserve and it works great. My son has actually said that he has gained friends because of me. So not all children will be given grief because their parents are there as long as the parent is not there hounding and hovering over the kids, but rather paying attention to all of them and interacting with them.
firefighters_wif e

United States

#20 Sep 10, 2008
I think that this is a great idea! Not only for the fact of dealing w/ "bullys", but there are many children out there who do not have a father figure in there life, and this would be so beneficial to them. I can only hope that our area school systems pick up this idea and run with it, it is so refreshing to see Fathers active in their childrens education (complete 360' from the Beaver Days)!

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