Getting bullish on production

Sep 1, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Snack Food/Wholesale Bakery

When challenged by its parent company to quadruple its output, El Matador Enterprises decided to invest in more efficient processing equipment to achieve this goal.

Comments
1 - 18 of 18 Comments Last updated Sep 14, 2013

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#1 Sep 2, 2013
Nothing like good old, down home, ECONOMIC NEWS.....

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#2 Sep 3, 2013
Guess no honest patriots on this forum.....
Really

Wyoming, MI

#3 Sep 3, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
Guess no honest patriots on this forum.....
El Matador never had issues Blue. Try some current news for a change, hmmmmmmm?
Oneal

Grand Rapids, MI

#4 Sep 3, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
Guess no honest patriots on this forum.....
You would define patriotism by those terms.
vox veritatis

Grand Rapids, MI

#5 Sep 3, 2013
Oneal wrote:
You would define patriotism by those terms.
Let's see...increased production, increased profits brought about by more efficient equipment (note, not more manpower) which actually uses LESS manpower. No talk about how many more jobs this has created...maybe because it hasn't?
Who knew Blue was in favor of corporate profits after all?
Batch 37 Pain Is Good

Keego Harbor, MI

#6 Sep 4, 2013
vox veritatis wrote:
<quoted text>
Let's see...increased production, increased profits brought about by more efficient equipment (note, not more manpower) which actually uses LESS manpower. No talk about how many more jobs this has created...maybe because it hasn't?
Who knew Blue was in favor of corporate profits after all?
Blue doesn't see the commercial real estate signs up for sale and lease.....
Elephant Gun

Shelby, MI

#7 Sep 6, 2013
Batch 37 Pain Is Good wrote:
<quoted text>Blue doesn't see the commercial real estate signs up for sale and lease.....
And the corporate socialist batch pops up again begging for more corporate welfare.
Really

Wyoming, MI

#8 Sep 6, 2013
Elephant Gun wrote:
<quoted text>And the corporate socialist batch pops up again begging for more corporate welfare.
And Elephant Dung can't see or read anything. It's a skill they never learned.

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#9 Sep 6, 2013
MANUFACTURING PACE HITS TWO-YEAR PEAK...(UPI) 9-4-13...U.S. factories expanded last month at the fastest pace since June 2007 on a jump in orders. The report signals that manufacturing output could strengthen even more, in coming months.....The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, said Tuesday that it's manufacturing index rose to 55.7in August from 55.4 in July. That topped the index's 12-month average of 52. A READING ABOVE 50, INDICATES GROWTH......A gauge of new orders rose nearly 5 points to 63.2, the highest level in more than two years......

Since: Feb 10

Grand Rapids, MI

#10 Sep 8, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
MANUFACTURING PACE HITS TWO-YEAR PEAK...(UPI) 9-4-13...U.S. factories expanded last month at the fastest pace since June 2007 on a jump in orders. The report signals that manufacturing output could strengthen even more, in coming months.....The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, said Tuesday that it's manufacturing index rose to 55.7in August from 55.4 in July. That topped the index's 12-month average of 52. A READING ABOVE 50, INDICATES GROWTH......A gauge of new orders rose nearly 5 points to 63.2, the highest level in more than two years......
First, here is a link to this:
http://m.sltrib.com/sltrib/mobile3/56818908-2...

Second the lead is "S. factories expanded last month at the fastest pace since June 2011 on a jump in orders." The recession ended four years ago. If you want to make a case that the left has any economic sense than produce an article that says manufacturing exceeds that of 2004-2007, before the D's took over Congress and the the Presidency.

Third midway though the article it says "The jobs report for August, to be released Friday, is the most important remaining economic report the Fed will consider." We know the jobs report for August sucked from a Capitalist POV but was ok from the Socialist/Left POV.

Fourth it also said "businesses also sharply reduced their orders for capital goods such as computers, electrical equipment and other items. That decline may signal that business investment, an important driver of the economy, could slow." Of course you don't want to talk about that.

Obamanomics is a failure but too many people are too stupid to realize it.
Batch 37 Pain Is Good

Southfield, MI

#11 Sep 9, 2013
Elephant Gun wrote:
<quoted text>And the corporate socialist batch pops up again begging for more corporate welfare.
Where did I say that you commie pinko........

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#12 Sep 12, 2013
ECONOMIC GROWTH STEADY ACROSS THE U.S.......AP(9-6-13)...Economi c growth held steady across the United States from July through late August, as Americans bought more cars and homes and auto factories added workers.....A Federal Reserve survey released Wednesday showed that all 12 of the Fed's regional banking districts reported modest to moderate growth. That's roughly in line with the Fed's previous survey of those districts from late May through early July.....Attractive financing options helped boost demand for new cars and trucks in most districts, with many reporting robust sales.....The survey, known as the beige book, said that job growth was steady and that hiring in manufacturing improved modestly....
free thinker

Farmington, MI

#13 Sep 13, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
.The survey, known as the beige book, said that job growth was steady and that hiring in manufacturing improved modestly....
Sure...part time jobs that nobody can live on and they sure as hell can't support a family on. Why do you hate your fellow Americans?
Batch 37 Pain Is Good

Southfield, MI

#14 Sep 13, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
ECONOMIC GROWTH STEADY ACROSS THE U.S.......AP(9-6-13)...Economi c growth held steady across the United States from July through late August, as Americans bought more cars and homes and auto factories added workers.....A Federal Reserve survey released Wednesday showed that all 12 of the Fed's regional banking districts reported modest to moderate growth. That's roughly in line with the Fed's previous survey of those districts from late May through early July.....Attractive financing options helped boost demand for new cars and trucks in most districts, with many reporting robust sales.....The survey, known as the beige book, said that job growth was steady and that hiring in manufacturing improved modestly....
I can't wait to get a piece of your pension.......

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#15 Sep 13, 2013
BUCKING THE ODDS....(9-13-13)AP....Septemb er historically is the worst month of the year for stocks , and the prospects of a U.S. attack on Syria only added to investor worries, but the Dow Jones Industrial average is up 3.3 percent this month, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index is up 3.1 percent.....

Since: Feb 10

Grand Rapids, MI

#16 Sep 14, 2013
Go Blue Forever wrote:
BUCKING THE ODDS....(9-13-13)AP....Septemb er historically is the worst month of the year for stocks , and the prospects of a U.S. attack on Syria only added to investor worries, but the Dow Jones Industrial average is up 3.3 percent this month, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index is up 3.1 percent.....
As was said during the Depression and is now being said about Obama (and confirmed by your post)...Obama's economy isn't so bad, if you have a real job.”

http://pjmedia.com/blog/this-depressing-econo...

The government’s August jobs report from its Bureau of Labor Statistics was all too typically lackluster.

It is true that 164,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs were added during the month, per the Establishment Survey of employers, but June and July were revised down by a combined 75,000. The Household Survey used to determine the unemployment rate had even grimmer news, as it showed that 115,000 fewer Americans were working in August than in July. The only reason that the official (“U-3&#8243;) unemployment rate fell to 7.3 percent is because the civilian workforce shrunk by over 300,000, taking the labor force participation down to 63.2 percent, that figure’s lowest level in since 1978.

Looking back further, since President Obama was first inaugurated in January 2009, seasonally adjusted employment per the Household Survey has increased by just over 2 million, while the number of adults not in the labor force has skyrocketed by almost 10 million.

On Wednesday, the Obama administration indicated that it wants to take the focus off of Syria and for the umpteenth time shift the president’s energies back to the economy. Haven’t you guys done enough damage already?

It may be hard to get used to the idea, but the onslaught of statistics such as these in the areas of employment and output indicates that we’re in an economy which, in certain statistical respects, more resembles what the nation experienced during the 1930s than during the other far more legitimate recoveries seen since World War II.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that the level of human suffering currently occurring — though it has been virtually ignored and vastly understated by an establishment press which has seemingly excised the terms “homelessness” and “tent cities” from its dictionaries while losing its directions to the low-priced weekly motels where so many downtrodden families now live — is anywhere near what it was during the Great Depression.

That said, data at the federal government’s Bureau of Economic Analysis shows that the economy under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt took barely longer to recover from the steep 26 percent nosedive in real gross domestic product (GDP) which took place from 1929 to 1933 than the economy under Barack Obama has since the most recent recession’s 4.3 percent real GDP decline officially ended in the second quarter of 2009. It may be that the only thing keeping the Obama “recovery” from looking worse on the GDP front is that quarterly stats didn’t become available until shortly after World War II.

The economy under Roosevelt recovered what had been lost in 1936, three years after the Depression’s trough, and grew at a compound annual rate of almost 11 percent to get there. That pace of growth, accompanied by the decade’s high unemployment, explains the popular saying about that period, namely that “the Great Depression wasn’t so bad, if you had a job.”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#17 Sep 14, 2013
CONSTRUCTION PROJECT SPENDING UP IN JULY...(9-4-13)AP....Spending on U.S. construction projects rose 0.6 percent in July from June, led by strong gains in housing and nonresidential projects, the Commerce Department reported.....The advance in housing activity pushed residential construction to it's highest level since September 2008. The increase in nonresidential building was led by a 6.1 percent increase in construction of hotels and motels. Office building and the category that covers shopping centers also showed gains. Government projects fell 0.3 percent in JULY.....Total construction is 5.2 percent higher than it was a year ago. Public construction is down 3.7 percent from a year ago as all levels of government are still facing tight budget constraints......
Really

Wyoming, MI

#18 Sep 14, 2013
FLBeaver wrote:
<quoted text>
As was said during the Depression and is now being said about Obama (and confirmed by your post)...Obama's economy isn't so bad, if you have a real job.”
http://pjmedia.com/blog/this-depressing-econo...
The government’s August jobs report from its Bureau of Labor Statistics was all too typically lackluster.
It is true that 164,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs were added during the month, per the Establishment Survey of employers, but June and July were revised down by a combined 75,000. The Household Survey used to determine the unemployment rate had even grimmer news, as it showed that 115,000 fewer Americans were working in August than in July. The only reason that the official (“U-3&#8243;) unemployment rate fell to 7.3 percent is because the civilian workforce shrunk by over 300,000, taking the labor force participation down to 63.2 percent, that figure’s lowest level in since 1978.
Looking back further, since President Obama was first inaugurated in January 2009, seasonally adjusted employment per the Household Survey has increased by just over 2 million, while the number of adults not in the labor force has skyrocketed by almost 10 million.
On Wednesday, the Obama administration indicated that it wants to take the focus off of Syria and for the umpteenth time shift the president’s energies back to the economy. Haven’t you guys done enough damage already?
It may be hard to get used to the idea, but the onslaught of statistics such as these in the areas of employment and output indicates that we’re in an economy which, in certain statistical respects, more resembles what the nation experienced during the 1930s than during the other far more legitimate recoveries seen since World War II.
To be clear, I’m not suggesting that the level of human suffering currently occurring — though it has been virtually ignored and vastly understated by an establishment press which has seemingly excised the terms “homelessness” and “tent cities” from its dictionaries while losing its directions to the low-priced weekly motels where so many downtrodden families now live — is anywhere near what it was during the Great Depression.
That said, data at the federal government’s Bureau of Economic Analysis shows that the economy under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt took barely longer to recover from the steep 26 percent nosedive in real gross domestic product (GDP) which took place from 1929 to 1933 than the economy under Barack Obama has since the most recent recession’s 4.3 percent real GDP decline officially ended in the second quarter of 2009. It may be that the only thing keeping the Obama “recovery” from looking worse on the GDP front is that quarterly stats didn’t become available until shortly after World War II.
The economy under Roosevelt recovered what had been lost in 1936, three years after the Depression’s trough, and grew at a compound annual rate of almost 11 percent to get there. That pace of growth, accompanied by the decade’s high unemployment, explains the popular saying about that period, namely that “the Great Depression wasn’t so bad, if you had a job.”
He doesn't care what you put up nor does he understand it.

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