Mayor Jeffery Lansky: should he stay ...
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mapleman

Bedford, OH

#61 Oct 30, 2011
libra123 wrote:
I am very surprised by the anti-union, anti-worker sentiment expressed on this blog here. Maple Heights is by no means the lifestyle of the rich and famous. There are alot of working families living right here in this city who patronize and frequent the businesses here. Once you start messing with their wages and all other benefits, the businesses in this town begin to suffer and will more enough money to patronize these businesses. I wish the attacks on public workers would stop. They are vital services needed in our community as well as every other community.
Screw public workers. That's my tax money being wasted. I say cut pay across the board, from top to the bottom. Police, teachers firemen, mayors --everyone. Their benefits packages are ridiculous when compared to workers in the private sector. All that costs money.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#62 Oct 30, 2011
libra123 wrote:
Unions raise wages for everyone and advocate for all workers regardless if they belong to a union or not. I guess you may have gathered that I am a union worker. I am by no means greedy or unwilling to make conpromises or concessions when needed. That's the purpose of negotiating a contract. It is not an us vs. them mentality. Employees and Employers are working together to arrive at a medium that works for all.
I stand along with other workers and say that Issue 2 is an issue about workers, not unions. Therefore, we cannot afford to have a divide and conquer attitude about public vs. private sector or union vs. non-union. If this issue passes, then we are all screwed, union as well as non-union.
Absolutely the opposite.

Why do you suppose Boeing built their new 1 billion dollar plant in a right-to-work-state? Because unions and their strikes cost the company millions not to mention lost customers who could no longer wait for their planes to be built over some stupid union. And if Obama is some way able to stop production in their new South Carolina plant, Boing states they will move that industry to China. So it is a union vs non-union issue because the union Boeing workers in Washington state lost out, and the good people of SC cashed in.

And let me ask: how is it fair to me as a non-union worker that has to work until the age of 67 only to end up on Medicare to pay Ohio taxes to support a government worker who will retire early with medical benefits? Tell me that it's not union vs non-union.

Your statement about raising wages for all workers reminds me of an argument my retired union bricklayer father used on me. In discussion, he would always try to settle the argument by saying "If not for us union people, you would not be making the wages you are today as a non-union truck driver," After he used that argument one too many times, I finally responded by saying "Dad, if I could afford one of your union built houses, I wouldn't have to make the money I make today," He never tried to use that argument against me again. LOL!

Yes unions increase wages for all, but they also increase prices for all as well. Nobody gets ahead. All we really do is continue to out price ourselves out of the world market. And that's why unions are primarily responsible for our jobs going to China.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#63 Oct 30, 2011
libra123 wrote:
I am very surprised by the anti-union, anti-worker sentiment expressed on this blog here. Maple Heights is by no means the lifestyle of the rich and famous. There are alot of working families living right here in this city who patronize and frequent the businesses here. Once you start messing with their wages and all other benefits, the businesses in this town begin to suffer and will more enough money to patronize these businesses. I wish the attacks on public workers would stop. They are vital services needed in our community as well as every other community.
Nobody said they were not. But what don't you union people understand about the word "broke?" Do you know what broke means? It means there is no more money. It means we are in debt. It means that all must make cuts from our cities, to our counties, and to our state. Everybody must sacrifice, union government workers no exception.

And what will likely happen if Issue 2 is voted down? Kasich will likely layoff government employees, and then these valuable services you care so much about will decrease. Is that what you want? What happens if you are one of those employees that gets laid off? Will you still be glad Issue 2 was defeated? Better think twice before you pull that lever on election day.
libra123

Lakewood, OH

#64 Nov 7, 2011
And yes, I will vote NO on election. The fact is we are going to win and this will be the end of Kasich and his wall street cronies trying to screw working people.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#65 Nov 7, 2011
Ah yes. There is that liberal code word again--working people. Working people by liberal definition means union people. So why not come right out and say union people? Why do liberals have to lie so much?

Just remember, it's the real working people that have to support those union workers who receive benefits far beyond the private sector. It's working people who have had their benefits slashed, pay more employee contributions or had their benefits canceled that have to pay taxes for those wonderful state workers benefits.

So if you have any concern for real working people, then vote yes on Issue 2.
mapleman

Bedford, OH

#66 Nov 7, 2011
I just don't get how people are lumping in public sector workers with private sector workers. Data entry in the private sector =$8/hr. Data entry in the public sector =$15/hr plus crazy benefits.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#67 Nov 7, 2011
That's on average. But comparing similar jobs, the public sector makes around 2% less in pay than the private sector, but has 34% more in benefits including early retirement.

When the state began to see troubles, the teachers voted for extending the minimum retirement age to 60 years old. That's still 5 years earlier than people outside the public sector. Prior to that, the minimum age was 30 years of service. So an aggressive college graduate who started teaching at the age of 22 could retire at the age of 52.

Same holds true of police and fire. On average, they could retire at the age of 48 if they started early on. They moved that retirement up to age 50. Still, 15 years earlier than the average person in the private sector.

Given the fact that the average lifespan is 78 years old in the US, that's a hell of a lot of support from the public when people retire so early. And because SS is in trouble in the near future, they are talking about extending our retirement to 68 years old or more. Public unions don;t contribute to SS. Instead, they have their own retirement plan that we pay for through taxes.
mapleman

Bedford, OH

#68 Nov 7, 2011
The numbers for salaries are not representing the whole story. Private sector has people making a lot more money on the higher end. So the average doesn't even tell the true story as it relates to the "working people" so often referred to. And we already know the benefits are a goldmine.

Not trying to demean a profession, but I could do the job of a policeman and fireman before they could do mine. Same with teachers. Seeing as when I started my business, I taught various computer related courses. It was a cakewalk.

Screw the public sector. There are a lot of people that can easily take those jobs and be happy.
libra123

Lakewood, OH

#69 Nov 16, 2011
You can't say for sure if you can do someone else's job unless you've walked in their shoes. Seriously, can you perform as a policeman or fireman or teacher without any training? I think not. Everyone is not cut out to be a teacher, firefighter or police officer. There may be people who can take those jobs, but the reality is those jobs are not being filled so quickly.
browns

Nashville, TN

#70 Nov 16, 2011
mapleman wrote:
<quoted text>
Screw public workers. That's my tax money being wasted. I say cut pay across the board, from top to the bottom. Police, teachers firemen, mayors --everyone. Their benefits packages are ridiculous when compared to workers in the private sector. All that costs money.
HELL YES,I SECOND THAT.....
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#71 Nov 16, 2011
libra123 wrote:
You can't say for sure if you can do someone else's job unless you've walked in their shoes. Seriously, can you perform as a policeman or fireman or teacher without any training? I think not. Everyone is not cut out to be a teacher, firefighter or police officer. There may be people who can take those jobs, but the reality is those jobs are not being filled so quickly.
What in the world are you talking about?

My friends son has this desire to be in law enforcement. He spent a couple of years in college because he wanted to work for the feds. It never happened. He couldn't get in. So he lowered his standards to become a police officer. That didn't work out either. So he took his very own money and joined the Police Academy. He graduated, and now works part-time with the Sheriffs Office--much of it volunteer work where he doesn't get paid.

Every single time I've read articles where cities, counties or the state are looking for applicants in these fields of work, they are flooded with people. You have to know somebody or spend years pursuing these careers. Teachers are no different. Trust me, a friend of mine is a teacher, and when he got laid off in Maple, it took him over a year to find another teaching job in spite of his spotless record and union tenure. There are no shortages of teachers, police or firemen. The jobs pay way too well and offer benefits unheard of in private industry. If anything, there is a waiting list to get in.
mapleman

Bedford, OH

#72 Nov 17, 2011
libra123 wrote:
You can't say for sure if you can do someone else's job unless you've walked in their shoes. Seriously, can you perform as a policeman or fireman or teacher without any training? I think not. Everyone is not cut out to be a teacher, firefighter or police officer. There may be people who can take those jobs, but the reality is those jobs are not being filled so quickly.
You can't be serious. Any idiot can become a police office with six months of training. Does that mean they will like the job? Of course not. A fireman isn't that hard of a profession either(I do respect them for risking their lives). There is a reason why citizens of the past were able volunteer police and firemen, the jobs require basic skills. Same with teachers. Like XXX said, anytime there is a job opening hundreds apply.

Can the same be said for chemical engineering? Software developers? Doctors? I think not. Each one of those jobs requires extensive training and a higher than normal IQ. You aren't training for those jobs in months and getting a position.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#73 Nov 17, 2011
Exactly, and in particular--teachers.

Why does one need a two or four year college degree to teach ABC's?

For many of my years, I was educated in the Catholic school system. While we had a few so-called professional teachers, those nuns did just as good of a job if not better. They had no college, and perhaps some didn't even have a high school diploma. But the Catholic school would put their students nose to nose with any public educated child.

Home schooling seems to be something that's really catching on. Many of these stay at home moms don't have any advanced education in teaching. Yet, home schooled children rank just as high if not higher in some cases when it comes to results.

This is not to say that advanced education is not helpful when it comes to being a teacher, but for the life of me, I certainly can't see the absolute necessity of it either. It's a high paying job with outstanding benefits where you only work nearly a half-year and make a great living.
mapleman

Bedford, OH

#74 Nov 18, 2011
Excellent argument. You know I never, ever thought about the nuns. I also had to deal with nuns growing up, you mean to tell me they didn't even have college degrees?

Until you get into advanced education, teaching simply isn't that hard. I have taught classes on technology that I didn't learn in college. Most of my students were able to pass the certification test with flying colors. And I am talking about advanced technology. So I speak from experiencing. Teachers are overrated.

Homeschooling is pissing teachers off. It shows how unimportant they are when competent parents takeover their children's education. Children that are home schooled are graduating at 16 and are prepared for college. I think I showed last year how the teacher's union is trying to make home schooling harder for parents. Pathetic. That is why I don't support teachers.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#75 Nov 18, 2011
Of course they fought it.

I remember several years ago when the Democrats fought school vouchers. The vouchers were aimed at poor minorities who were stuck in a less than productive school. They took it to court claiming the violation of Church and State because many parents used those vouchers for a private religious school.

The courts didn't buy it and the voucher program was allowed to continue. But the most upsetting thing was to see politicians and unions willing to sacrifice thousands of lives for their political advantage. I remember watching the news when it first happened with a mother crying frantically because they wanted to stop the program forcing her child back into the public schools where he was going down the wrong path. Private school not only improved his grades, but his entire life as well.

I guess they would rather see that child end up with the wrong group of kids and eventually end up in the gutter with a bullet through his head as we so often see on the news here in Cleveland. Absolutely disgusting.
mapleman

Bedford, OH

#76 Nov 19, 2011
This is one thing we agree on. Parents have been taken out of the educational process and teachers have been deified. If the people in the inner city would actually pick up a book, then maybe they could educate their children.

This is why the Asians come here and take our lunch. I am talking everyone's lunch. Whites don't even want them in their schools because they throw the curve off. Are they smarter? No. But the parents are serious about education. They spend hours and hours studying with the kids. All the kids have to do is just show up at school. lol Parents already have went over the whole textbook with them. They don't need private schools. You can put an Asian in the worst school system and he or she will excel.
xxxrayted

Brook Park, OH

#77 Nov 19, 2011
Many Asians are brought up in an entirely different environment. They are extremely disciplined people who respect authority. They have honor and respect for their elders including their parents whereas in Maple Heights, police have to constantly respond to calls of a child attacking the father or leaving the home without permission because he or she is pissed.

I honestly believe that the Asians and Jewish are the two most intelligent races on the planet. The only reason they fail is because of something they did wrong--not blame other people for their plight. They focus, pursue, and accomplish.

A few years back, the US executed our first female prisoner. So the media went around the world to find out what other people in different countries thought. I don't have to tell you the responses of people from Europe--especially France. They went on and on how Americans are animals. Then they went to an elderly Asian guy who spoke no English. They translated the question to him, and his reply was very short. He said "Execute one--teach a million."

Studying martial arts for seven years, you learn a little bit about the Asian culture. They are really dignified people.
Tamale

Cleveland, OH

#78 Nov 1, 2012
The building dept. of Maple Hts. in no way are the inspectors on the same page.There is no consistancy in the violations they write up.Depending on the mood they are in dictates what violations they screw you on.I would like to see the entire dept.terminated .The majoriety of the staff have a serious attitude problem,especially the office personal and the building comminssioner!!!
Maple Resident

Berea, OH

#79 Nov 2, 2012
I had an uncle that had a small apartment building in Lakewood years ago. This was back in the 1950s' to the 1980s'. He would tell me about how the tenants would stop paying their rent and when he'd go to the apartment and go inside the suite to see what's going on, the renter would be gone and the place would be all tore up. So he'd have to fix the place back up to rent it out again. A couple renters left the water running when they walked out and so the water ran for a week or so. My uncle was a great guy too. The type that would give you the proverbial shirt off his back. And these tenants would skip out after a few months of not paying rent.

Plus, I remember going there with my dad when I was a kid and helping fix things there. There was always some place that had to have money put into it. So Lansky has no idea what landlords go through. Me, I'd never want to rent out a house. Especially not to section 8ers'.
Cdg

Independence, OH

#80 Dec 29, 2013
Landlords in Maple Heights don't make money when they sell either... I paid more for my home in 1983 then it is worth now. The building department took in a million dollars in 2012 and paid $500,000 in salaries. If their fees would have been applied across the board equally to everyone then they should have taken over in 2 million. Discriminating against landlords does not help the city.... and records show that many landlords did not comply with the fees/ laws and we're not prosecuted. Building inspectors perjured themselves in court and we're not prosecuted.

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