Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#1 Aug 23, 2014
Here's what is lurking in police departments nationwide.

http://news.yahoo.com/suspended-st-louis-poli...
From the story:

I personally believe in Jesus Christ as my lord and savior, but I’m also a killer,” said officer Dan Page, a 35-year veteran, in the video.“I’ve killed a lot. And if I need to, I’ll kill a whole bunch more. If you don’t want to get killed, don’t show up in front of me. I have no problems with it. God did not raise me to be a coward." Page added,“I’m into diversity — I kill everybody. I don’t care."

----------

Another rocket scientist cop who posted a picture that wasn't Michael Brown before going on a social media rant.

http://newsone.com/3046718/marc-catron-mike-b...

Of course, the two pieces above speak to the mentality of some cops.

Cops arrested by feds for racial profiling(I thought it didn't exist).

http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/24/justice/connect...

Here's another one...

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-04-1...

And there's a lot more. Let's face it, there are thugs out here doing wrong, but there are also a good number of thugs wearing a badge. I've said any idiot can become a cop....

Here's proof...

http://countercurrentnews.com/2014/04/police-...

The reason departments don't want to hire intelligent people is because they would get to bored with the job. The departments would lose money in training.(And having a four-year degree doesn't mean you are intelligent.)
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#2 Aug 24, 2014
Interesting data about body cameras.

--------

In the town of Rialto, California, within the first year of the cameras' introduction, use of force by officers declined 60 percent, while complaints against police plunged by 88 percent, the New York Times reported.

Read more at http://www.9news.com.au/world/2014/08/19/00/3...

----------

With cameras, complaints dropped by 88 percent and use of force by 60 percent. Wow. Seems to work for all involved while keeping police on the behavior they are supposed to exhibit as trained civil servants.
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#3 Aug 25, 2014
http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2014/02/blo...

----------

Two Bloomfield police officers have been indicted on conspiracy and misconduct charges after a dashboard video from a police cruiser raised doubts about the officers' account of an arrest of a man accused of eluding police, prosecutors said.

Officers Orlando Trinidad and Sean Courter, both 33, were arraigned Friday in Superior Court in Newark on charges of conspiracy, official misconduct, tampering with public records and false swearing, Essex County prosecutors say. Trinidad also faces an aggravated assault charge.

Prosecutors say the charges stem from the June 2012 arrest of 30-year-old Marcus Jeter, of Bloomfield, on charges of eluding, resisting arrest and assaulting an officer by punching him in the face.

Prosecutors dismissed charges against Jeter in April after an investigation, first reported by WABC-TV, turned up a dashboard video from one of two police cruisers that responded to the incident.

“The charges are linked to the fact that a second video came to light during the course of this investigation,” said Katherine Carter, a spokeswoman for the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office.

----------

Yet another case proven that interaction with police must be taped so that pigs can be weeded out. A dash cam in the Ferguson car would have ended all speculation about the incident involving Michael Brown. Why police are against them I'll never know.
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#4 Aug 25, 2014
http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cop-caught-s...

----------
Cop Caught Stealing Dying Man’s $3,700 and Golden Crucifix on Dash Cam

A Connecticut state trooper is due in court this fall for sentencing, after he was found guilty of stealing from a motorcyclist who was dying on the side of the road. Dash cam footage from the officer’s patrol car showed him stealing cash from the dying man, as well as a golden crucifix.
----------

Pigs are out of control. Why do some people think we should accept misconduct? Record them all.
xxxrayted

Maple Heights, OH

#5 Aug 25, 2014
So what is your point in all this? Without a doubt, whenever you have a large group of any people, there are bound to be a few bad apples: Police, firemen, Catholic priests, Cub Scout leaders, Businessmen, Politicians, CCW holders, Mortgage lenders, Lawyers, Employers, the list goes on and on.

But you don't crucify an entire group of people because of the few. 99% of those people in any group are good people.

The argument of small percentages

Statistics in terms of police misconduct mean little without something with which to compare them with. The first thing a police officer or anti-police accountability debater will tell you in a debate is that officers who are caught doing something wrong are a very small percentage of the police population in the US.

For example, I’ve seen people point to one of our daily reviews of police misconduct reports and say,“Look, 28 cases in one day! That’s a problem!” to which an antagonist will say “No it’s not, 28 officers is a very small number of the 800,000 police officers in the US!”

Well, they are right, 28 out of 800,000 is a small percentage and nowhere near a majority of the police population in the US. In fact, our statistics indicate that just under 1000 per 100,000 police officers per year are involved in credible reports of police misconduct. Yes, that translates to under 1% of all police officers.

http://www.policemisconduct.net/arguing-the-c...
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#6 Aug 26, 2014
People seem to be uneducated when it comes to how rampant police misconduct actually is. Let's see what the Feds have to say.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/07/22/us-...

Feds: Police misconduct rampant in Newark, N.J., city OKs monitor

----------

Specifically, the report said, police violated rights through stop-and-arrest practices that disproportionately targeted blacks, stealing citizens' property and cracking down on people who lawfully objected to police behavior.

The federal investigation uncovered a practice of stopping pedestrians without sufficient justification in nearly 75 percent of cases.

It also found police disproportionately targeted blacks, who accounted for 85 percent of pedestrian stops and yet are roughly 54 percent of Newark's population.

----------

Very few bad officers, huh? When a large department such as the one in Newark is stopping people without sufficient justification while racial profiling, I'd say we have a very serious problem that has to do with a lot more than a mere 1% of police officers. And this doesn't even speak to the DWB trouble Jersey had years ago.

What's that? Not enough proof of rampant misconduct and departments covering it up?

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/seven-...
----------

Only one out of every three accused cops are convicted nationwide, while the conviction rate for civilians is literally double that. In Chicago, the numbers are even more skewed: There were 10,000 abuse complaints filed against the Chicago PD between 2002 and 2004, and just 19 of them ”resulted in meaningful disciplinary action.”

On a national level, upwards of 95 percent of police misconduct cases referred for federal prosecution are declined by prosecutors because, as reported in USA Today, juries “are conditioned to believe cops, and victims’ credibility is often challenged.” Failure to remedy this police/civilian double standard cultivates an abuse-friendly legal environment.

----------

And remember, a lot of abuse complaints are never filed because people believe -- and rightfully so -- nothing will be done to the officers.

It's much more than 1 percent. I'd say that police misconduct would be at least similar to that to the criminality of the general population. It's probably greater since they have more power and a system designed to protect them(the conviction rate for citizens is double that of police).

Still need more proof? What do officers have to say about police abuse? From the last link.

----------

A Department of Justice study revealed that a whopping 84 percent of police officers report that they’ve seen colleagues use excessive force on civilians, and 61 percent admit they don’t always report “even serious criminal violations that involve abuse of authority by fellow officers.”

----------

So 84 percent of police admit they see police brutality and most of them admit not always filing a report.

Case closed. It's rampant. It's covered up. They should be held accountable.
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#7 Aug 26, 2014
White mother of a black son learns what black parents already know: Racial profiling and police brutality are real.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/alex-landau-after...

----------

Patsy Hathaway quit her job to join her son's fight against racial profiling and excessive force. CBS News

Hathaway and her now ex-husband adopted Alex and his sister, Maya, when they were babies. As a white mother raising a black son, she never had "the talk" with her son - the talk many black parents have about encounters with police.

"I was terribly uneducated about all of this. And I learned the very, very hard way, when they almost killed him.... The problem is racism."

----------

Even though she adopted black children and is obviously not a racist, she was wasn't aware of racial profiling and police brutality. Combine that with citizens being conditioned to believe police can do no wrong and we see how we end up with things the way they are.

Racial profiling and police brutality are not the only thing white people have to educate themselves about. They also need to learn about how it financially affects their city.

Guess what white America? When these pigs get sued and the city pays, it's YOUR tax dollars. The pigs don't pay a dime of their own money. It was $800,000 in the case of Hathaway's son. NYPD paid nearly $1 billion dollars in 10 years.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2010/10/14/nypd-p...

So even though the cops are rarely charged or punished, lawsuits are still settled and taxpayers pay. Some 30,000 lawsuits are filed each year. Just defending against them costs money.

It's no wonder police departments can't afford cameras. They are paying that money to settle lawsuits that the cameras could prevent.
Maple Resident

Maple Heights, OH

#8 Aug 26, 2014
Maybe protect and serve means protect the innocent and serve bullets to the criminals. hee hee hee!
xxxrayted

Maple Heights, OH

#9 Aug 26, 2014
Maple Resident wrote:
Maybe protect and serve means protect the innocent and serve bullets to the criminals. hee hee hee!
Yeah, just as long as they are not black and unarmed. If they are, blacks expect the cop to get the ship beat out of him and nothing he can do about it.
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#10 Aug 26, 2014
Maple Resident wrote:
Maybe protect and serve means protect the innocent and serve bullets to the criminals. hee hee hee!
Funny response. Especially since you have claimed to have dealt with police misconduct before. But in your case, you just took it and were glad they didn't do worse.

Also, when is the last time they did their job and enforced one of your noise complaints? Aren't you an innocent? Aren't their fines in place for loud music and disturbing the peace? Didn't they tell you to move before? And you stick up for people like that? LOL
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#11 Aug 26, 2014
Well, well, well. What do we have here. And it's in Ohio.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/08/26/video-s...

Video shows police shot Ohio man ‘on sight’ as he leaned on toy gun in Walmart, attorney says

----------

The attorney said surveillance video showed Crawford facing away from officers, talking on the phone, and leaning on the pellet gun like a cane when he was “shot on sight” in a “militaristic” response by police.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced Tuesday handed the case over to a special prosecutor to present to a grand jury Sept. 22.

DeWine said Tuesday he was glad he had allowed Crawford’s family to view the surveillance video, but he did not plan to publicly release the video to avoid tainting the jury pool.

----------

Piggies caught on tape. DeWine is handling this correctly. Releasing a video of an execution during this climate would only make things worse(nice cover with the Jury pool story).

Funny, one caller to 911 started this. Supposedly, Crawford was pointing the weapon at people and threatening them. Yet there is only one 911 call. Strange. Most people would call 911 themselves or run off telling people to call 911.
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#12 Aug 28, 2014
Philly Police Officer Suing Philly Police Department for Brutality

Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/police-offic...

----------

Ruff said that he was turning the guns in to the police department because a neighbor asked him to and he felt that taking care of things like this was a part of his job.

When he was off duty he made sure that the guns were unloaded and took them a local police department. When he arrived he turned the guns in and said that he was delivering them to the precinct under a “no-questions-asked” policy and said that he wished to speak with a supervisor. After waiting for an extended period of time for a supervisor to appear, Ruff told someone in the office that he would be stepping outside to make a phone call.

Just as he was stepping outside, someone shouted “there he is,” and at that moment a group of officers surrounded him. One of the officers came up behind Ruff and twisted his right hand behind his back, while two others held Tasers to his chest and rib cage and threatened to activate them.

When he was able to react, Ruff used a code number to identify himself as a police officer and said that his ID was in his pocket, the lawsuit states. Ruff was then arrested and held for 6 hours until he was finally released. After he was released, the Philadelphia police department opened up an internal investigation on him and reassigned him to desk duty.

Ruff also alleges rampant corruption in his lawsuit and states that the police department as a whole encourages and tolerates officers who “misrepresent facts in order to establish probable cause, and allows officers to have persons falsely arrested or maliciously prosecuted.”

Surprised?

----------

Crooked departments nationwide. LOL
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#13 Aug 28, 2014
Cops giving white guy shat for taking pictures of police department. Accuse him of terrorism. Hilarity ensues. LOL

Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#14 Aug 29, 2014
Police Officer Will Not Be Charged For Killing Napster Exec While Texting And Driving — Because It's Apparently OK For Police To Do That

http://www.businessinsider.com/police-officer...

----------

Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy Andrew Wood will not be charged for fatally running over former Napster COO Milton Olin Jr. in his patrol car while the officer was typing a message into his computer.

We first saw the news on Valleywag, but there is good coverage in the Daily News and LAist.

The instance exposes the different way that law enforcement officials are treated versus civilians in cases where a person is killed because of texting while driving.

It's illegal to text and drive in California; the state has a specific law against it. Civilians caught doing it can expect to face charges. But a report from the Los Angeles District Attorney's office shows that the rules may be applied differently to cops.

----------

One word: Unbelievable. The hypocrisy involved when applying laws to civilians and police shouldn't be tolerated. So it's perfectly fine for the officer to be negligent when responding to non-emergency communication, but if you get a text that your child has been in an accident and attempt to send a text back, you're a criminal. LOL
Mapleman

Maple Heights, OH

#15 Aug 30, 2014
Rand Paul Files Asset Forfeiture Reform Bill

http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2014/jul/...

----------

The FAIR Act would require that state law enforcement agencies abide by state law when seizing property. It would also remove the profit incentive for forfeiture by redirecting forfeitures' assets from the Attorney General's Asset Forfeiture Fund to the Treasury's General Fund.

"The federal government has made it far too easy for government agencies to take and profit from the property of those who have not been convicted of a crime. The FAIR Act will ensure that government agencies no longer profit from taking the property of U.S. citizens without due process, while maintaining the ability of courts to order the surrender of proceeds of crime," Sen. Paul said.

----------

Most citizens don't realize how corrupt law enforcement can be. Stealing millions of dollars from citizens who can't even be convicted of crimes.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Garfield Heights Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Maple Heights City Council 32 min Luck all those pe... 36
Hatchet Man in NY Fri xxxrayted 2
People Walk Out On Obama Campaign Speech Fri xxxrayted 8
cuyahoga amateur radio society sucks Fri Bill 13
Eboli in Texas Fri R Taylor 15
Maple Heights News is looking for opinion piece... Oct 23 annomous 16
Life As We Knew It Oct 23 R Taylor 16

Garfield Heights Jobs

Garfield Heights People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Garfield Heights News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Garfield Heights

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]