Man gets 15 years for selling meth

Man gets 15 years for selling meth

There are 22 comments on the The Indianapolis Star story from Mar 8, 2007, titled Man gets 15 years for selling meth. In it, The Indianapolis Star reports that:

A man convicted of dealing drugs has been sentenced to a 30-year term that will include prison, work release and probation.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Indianapolis Star.

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Name

Chesterfield, MO

#1 Mar 9, 2007
Elijah Gibson is a brilliant person and it is very sad to read this today. Very few in his high school class compared to him when it came to academic achievments.
Voice of Reason

AOL

#2 Mar 9, 2007
Name wrote:
Elijah Gibson is a brilliant person and it is very sad to read this today. Very few in his high school class compared to him when it came to academic achievments.
That is very sad. Maybe after he's served a little time, he can try to show the judge he's learned a lesson and will make something of his life. Sentences can be modified.

“Hardcore Libertarian”

Since: Dec 06

Madison, IN

#3 Mar 9, 2007
Meth is being over hyped and this ridiculous long sentence is evidence of that. First, methamphetamine use is not as extensive as drug warriors would like you to think. The proportion of Americans who use methamphetamine on a monthly basis has hovered in the range of 0.2 percent-0.3 percent since 1999. Policing is not "taking care" of methamphetamine. While limits on purchases of precursors have pushed many illicit labs out of our neighborhoods, the drug is still being manufactured -- just now it's across the border. Indeed, methamphetamine is now as available and cheap as it has ever been. There is hope, meth is actually less addictive then most other drugs methamphetamine users have a treatment completion rate of 35 percent, higher than users of cocaine/crack (32 percent) or heroin (29 percent).

We must reduce the harm that the drug causes and get people treatment. 10 years in prison is not going to solve the problem. We must stop the drug war and stop the stupid long sentences that represent injustice and shift funding from the programs that actually work. If you are a friend of freedom you will join me in denouncing The War on Drugs. It is a matter of public health no prison will ever be big enough.

“Hardcore Libertarian”

Since: Dec 06

Madison, IN

#4 Mar 9, 2007
oops 15years sorry
Voice of Reason

AOL

#6 Mar 9, 2007
Shawn wrote:
Meth is being over hyped and this ridiculous long sentence is evidence of that. First, methamphetamine use is not as extensive as drug warriors would like you to think. The proportion of Americans who use methamphetamine on a monthly basis has hovered in the range of 0.2 percent-0.3 percent since 1999. Policing is not "taking care" of methamphetamine. While limits on purchases of precursors have pushed many illicit labs out of our neighborhoods, the drug is still being manufactured -- just now it's across the border. Indeed, methamphetamine is now as available and cheap as it has ever been. There is hope, meth is actually less addictive then most other drugs methamphetamine users have a treatment completion rate of 35 percent, higher than users of cocaine/crack (32 percent) or heroin (29 percent).
We must reduce the harm that the drug causes and get people treatment. 10 years in prison is not going to solve the problem. We must stop the drug war and stop the stupid long sentences that represent injustice and shift funding from the programs that actually work. If you are a friend of freedom you will join me in denouncing The War on Drugs. It is a matter of public health no prison will ever be big enough.
Yes, let's denounce the war on drugs. Let's just surrender. Let's just turn over our streets to the druggies and leave them with no deterrent other than, "If we catch you, we'll treat the heck out of you. That'll learn ya, durn ya!" Your fuzzy "rehab" programs didn't work in the 60's and they don't work now. What works is sending a message that "you'll spend years in prison if you sell drugs on our streets." Now leave your touchy-feely, criminal friendly programs to liberal cities like Washington, D.C. where the populace is apparently happy living with liberal ideas. And their astronomical crime rates.

“just believe”

Since: Mar 07

Huntington

#7 Mar 9, 2007
Voice of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, let's denounce the war on drugs. Let's just surrender. Let's just turn over our streets to the druggies and leave them with no deterrent other than, "If we catch you, we'll treat the heck out of you. That'll learn ya, durn ya!" Your fuzzy "rehab" programs didn't work in the 60's and they don't work now. What works is sending a message that "you'll spend years in prison if you sell drugs on our streets." Now leave your touchy-feely, criminal friendly programs to liberal cities like Washington, D.C. where the populace is apparently happy living with liberal ideas. And their astronomical crime rates.
Well I kinda lean towards the liberal side however I would have given him 50 years for his sales. If he was so smart why was he selling drugs anyway? Drug dealers should be placed on a DRUG SALES/USERS list just like sex offenders are so parents can know if there living in their neighborhoods and keep them away from the kids. Drug dealers should not be allowed in parks or other places when kids hang out. Once a kid is hooked on drug the dealers have a customer for life.
UR CLUELESS

Indianapolis, IN

#8 Mar 9, 2007
Shawn wrote:
Meth is being over hyped and this ridiculous long sentence is evidence of that. First, methamphetamine use is not as extensive as drug warriors would like you to think. The proportion of Americans who use methamphetamine on a monthly basis has hovered in the range of 0.2 percent-0.3 percent since 1999. Policing is not "taking care" of methamphetamine. While limits on purchases of precursors have pushed many illicit labs out of our neighborhoods, the drug is still being manufactured -- just now it's across the border. Indeed, methamphetamine is now as available and cheap as it has ever been. There is hope, meth is actually less addictive then most other drugs methamphetamine users have a treatment completion rate of 35 percent, higher than users of cocaine/crack (32 percent) or heroin (29 percent).
We must reduce the harm that the drug causes and get people treatment. 10 years in prison is not going to solve the problem. We must stop the drug war and stop the stupid long sentences that represent injustice and shift funding from the programs that actually work. If you are a friend of freedom you will join me in denouncing The War on Drugs. It is a matter of public health no prison will ever be big enough.
typical lib.
One Who Knows

Newport, KY

#9 Mar 10, 2007
Shawn wrote:
Meth is being over hyped and this ridiculous long sentence is evidence of that. First, methamphetamine use is not as extensive as drug warriors would like you to think. The proportion of Americans who use methamphetamine on a monthly basis has hovered in the range of 0.2 percent-0.3 percent since 1999. Policing is not "taking care" of methamphetamine. While limits on purchases of precursors have pushed many illicit labs out of our neighborhoods, the drug is still being manufactured -- just now it's across the border. Indeed, methamphetamine is now as available and cheap as it has ever been. There is hope, meth is actually less addictive then most other drugs methamphetamine users have a treatment completion rate of 35 percent, higher than users of cocaine/crack (32 percent) or heroin (29 percent).
We must reduce the harm that the drug causes and get people treatment. 10 years in prison is not going to solve the problem. We must stop the drug war and stop the stupid long sentences that represent injustice and shift funding from the programs that actually work. If you are a friend of freedom you will join me in denouncing The War on Drugs. It is a matter of public health no prison will ever be big enough.
We must not let drugs get out of hand or our streets will look like Washington, D.C. and Detroit.
Voice of Reason

AOL

#10 Mar 10, 2007
One Who Knows wrote:
<quoted text>We must not let drugs get out of hand or our streets will look like Washington, D.C. and Detroit.
Dude, you are so right. It's really sad what those cities look like -- war zones.
hcir

Bellefontaine, OH

#11 Mar 12, 2007
That Is a big sentence But the drug users & pushers Know this in advance but yet they are willing to risk it.

If let go or ignored it will infest everything including our families health, Schools & More neighborhood crime. I pray He can get some help very soon.

“Hardcore Libertarian”

Since: Dec 06

Madison, IN

#12 Mar 12, 2007
Voice of Reason wrote:
<quoted text>Dude, you are so right. It's really sad what those cities look like -- war zones.
Funny because they are war zones. War will not make the situation better. Billions spent every year and you would think those target drug war zones would have less drugs in them? The drug problem has grown every year since prohibition started. The underground market drug probition has created make the cartel 300% profit. Now we catch 30% of cocaine before it is used on the street. We would have to catch 75% to make a dent in the drugs sold on the streets. I don't see that happening ever.

“Hardcore Libertarian”

Since: Dec 06

Madison, IN

#13 Mar 12, 2007
Voice of Reason wrote:
<quoted text> What works is sending a message that "you'll spend years in prison if you sell drugs on our streets."
It works? Does it? Has it ever worked? When? Please show me all the progress that has been made over the 30 years this technique has been in use? Not one , not one indicator is showing that the prison model is, has, or will ever work.

“Hardcore Libertarian”

Since: Dec 06

Madison, IN

#14 Mar 12, 2007
One Who Knows wrote:
<quoted text>We must not let drugs get out of hand or our streets will look like Washington, D.C. and Detroit.
Not true, they are the future of what the war on drugs will bring. Those cities are the results of the racial inequities in prosecution, and cyclic creation of a permanent underclass the war on drug creates. Those cities are where the model for the drug war was implimented first. You think the law is some how diffrent in those areas then here in Indiana? The drug war is in full force in Detroit and Washington D.C. 2X what it is here in Indiana.
hcir

Bellefontaine, OH

#15 Mar 12, 2007
One Who Knows wrote:
<quoted text>We must not let drugs get out of hand or our streets will look like Washington, D.C. and Detroit.
If this isn't taken care of you won't be able to get into your vehicle or your house without being knocked in the head or robbed. Its here now...& has to be stopped.
Voice of Reason

AOL

#16 Mar 14, 2007
Shawn wrote:
<quoted text>
It works? Does it? Has it ever worked? When? Please show me all the progress that has been made over the 30 years this technique has been in use? Not one , not one indicator is showing that the prison model is, has, or will ever work.
Aw gee, you're right. The drug laws haven't stopped drugs, so let's stop enforcing those silly drug laws. And the murder statutes haven't stopped murders, so let's stop prosecuting murderers. And since none of the other criminal laws have stopped criminals, let's stop enforcing all of them as well. I'm sure the criminal depredations in our society will remain static if we lay off all the police and fire all the prosecutors. Society will just get better because we can use all that money to feed the homeless and support the arts. If you're really that vacuous, you're too damnably dumb to live.
Jay Leno

AOL

#17 Mar 14, 2007
Shawn wrote:
<quoted text>
Not true, they are the future of what the war on drugs will bring. Those cities are the results of the racial inequities in prosecution, and cyclic creation of a permanent underclass the war on drug creates. Those cities are where the model for the drug war was implimented first. You think the law is some how diffrent in those areas then here in Indiana? The drug war is in full force in Detroit and Washington D.C. 2X what it is here in Indiana.
Welcome to this week's edition of Jay Walking. Our idiot of the day is our little friend Shawn. Shawn thinks that all problems in society are the result of racism and inequities and whole bunch of other $2 words he uses to express his 3 cent ideas. My, my, my, how ignorant this young generation is. But at least we can listen to him and laugh for awhile. Before we cry.
BLACK PANTHER

Laguna Beach, CA

#18 Mar 14, 2007
ALL YOU WHITE DEVILS USE THAT MESS.. ITS NOT A PROBLEM UNTIL THE BLACKS START SALEING I.1 CRACK ROCK CAN GET A BLACK PERSON 25 YEARS HARD TIME. BUT WHITE BOY WITH ENOUTH METH TO GET THE SATE OF INDIANA HIGH GETS A DEAL WITH PROBATION AND WORK RELEASE..WHITE DEVILS I HOPE ALL YOUR CHILDREN GET HOOKED ON THAT MESS
crooked

United States

#20 Mar 17, 2007
BLACK PANTHER wrote:
ALL YOU WHITE DEVILS USE THAT MESS.. ITS NOT A PROBLEM UNTIL THE BLACKS START SALEING I.1 CRACK ROCK CAN GET A BLACK PERSON 25 YEARS HARD TIME. BUT WHITE BOY WITH ENOUTH METH TO GET THE SATE OF INDIANA HIGH GETS A DEAL WITH PROBATION AND WORK RELEASE..WHITE DEVILS I HOPE ALL YOUR CHILDREN GET HOOKED ON THAT MESS
You can thank the pharmeceutical corporations, their lobbiests and quite a few friends of the big drug manufacturers, namely politicians. 34 Republicans and 11 Democrats that kept siding with these corrupt corporations to keep pseudophedrin on the shelves. Even though they knew what the enormous sales volumes they were recording of this drug was being used for, namely Meth! They knew that Meth cookers were using pseudophedrin and kept paying their political buddies to help keep it on the shelf. When they (the pharmeceutical companies)did bend under pressure from the DEA, they sold large quantities to overseas cookers and gave them an opportunity to import to users in the US. Thats why there's so much now coming from Mexico. Thanks to the "War on Drugs" look what our country has become. Crooked drug companies profitiering on deadly drugs while their fat cat political buddies sign laws to help them contiue reaping in this dirty money. I hate to admit that a local drug manufacturer was in on this. In my opinion, we need to relax the 'natural herb laws' and tighten up on the real bad drugs, including alcohol and nicotine.

“USA”

Since: Jan 07

USA

#21 Mar 20, 2007
Name wrote:
Elijah Gibson is a brilliant person and it is very sad to read this today. Very few in his high school class compared to him when it came to academic achievments.
Sure, this guy is a real genius. What an idiotic liberal statement. What does that say about the rest of his high school class ?
Somewhere this genius made the decision to violate the law (more than once) and now he can make the decision every morning for 15 years how he will get away from bubba in the bunk above.
Common Sense

AOL

#22 Mar 21, 2007
Larry W wrote:
<quoted text>
Sure, this guy is a real genius. What an idiotic liberal statement. What does that say about the rest of his high school class ?
Somewhere this genius made the decision to violate the law (more than once) and now he can make the decision every morning for 15 years how he will get away from bubba in the bunk above.
Totally agree, Larry.

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