Want to know

Frankfort, KY

#1 Apr 5, 2013
Can somebody please post the two stories in todays state journal . Ones about matt brown squandering drug money & the other is about pat squanderin money & mismanages it. Thanks
soundslike

Frankfort, KY

#2 Apr 5, 2013
Matt didn't but Pat did to me....
here you go again

Frankfort, KY

#3 Apr 5, 2013
Mishandled drug buy money leaves impact
Ex-deputy’s alleged tactics, errors spark court disputes
By Lindsey Erdody Published: April 5, 2013 10:21AM
A man accused of drug trafficking in Franklin County recently had two charges dropped, and both involved cases worked by a former Franklin County Sheriff’s deputy who may have been involved in stealing drug money.
In November and December 2011, Deputy Matt Brown coordinated undercover drug deals between a confidential witness and 53-year-old Raymond Plummer.
Plummer allegedly sold two Percocet pills for $60 the first time and the following month sold two Percocet pills for $55.
Plummer also faced drug trafficking charges from selling pills three times in June 2011.
In February, Plummer pleaded guilty to the three sales made in June, but the two trafficking charges handled by Brown were dropped.
After the plea, Commonwealth’s Attorney Larry Cleveland said given the evidence he had, a jury probably would have only convicted Plummer of three counts instead of five.
Plummer was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison.
In the reports made by Brown, obtained by The State Journal through an open records request, Plummer’s race is listed as black on one page and white on another page.
Brown, who worked as a narcotics detective, resigned in December “to pursue a new business opportunity,” according to his resignation letter.
Around the same time, Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton announced money was unaccounted for from the drug investigation funds and there could be criminal activity on the part of an employee.
Melton would not confirm that the employee was Brown, but said the employee involved had resigned.
After Melton discovered the missing money, he asked Kentucky State Police to open an investigation, which is being conducted by the KSP Drug Enforcement/Special Investigations Branch West.
The money was returned in December, but it’s unclear how much was taken.
Plummer’s case is not the only one that has been disputed in court or had errors in filed reports.
In November 2011, there was a suppression hearing for one of the cases against Don’o Clay, who was charged with trafficking in cocaine and three counts of possession of a handgun by a convicted felon.
here you go again

Frankfort, KY

#4 Apr 5, 2013
Clay’s attorney, Ted Shouse, argued Brown illegally searched Clay’s grandmother’s home where Clay had been staying.
According to testimony at the hearing, Brown had received a tip from a confidential source — whose name he couldn’t remember — that Clay was selling cocaine and had firearms in the basement of his grandmother’s house.
Brown went to the house, observed Clay leaving and stopped him. Clay allegedly started causing a disturbance, and Brown arrested him for disorderly conduct.
Shortly after that, Melton arrived at the house.
Brown went to the house and spoke with an elderly man, known to be Clay’s great uncle, and asked for permission to search the home. The man refused and told Brown to wait for Clay’s grandmother, Ann Clay, to return home.
However, Brown and Melton entered the home and stayed there for more than an hour before Ann Clay returned, according to testimony.
In the meantime, two witnesses testified Brown went into the basement, searching for drugs and guns despite not having permission to do so.
Brown denied going into the basement before
receiving consent.
Shouse also argued that Melton forced Ann Clay to sign consent to search forms by telling her she would lose her Section 8 housing if she didn’t.
Melton admitted to telling her she could lose her Section 8 housing by having drugs in the home, but denied doing so to force her to sign the consent form.
Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled to suppress all of the evidence from that incident, saying Ann Clay’s consent was not voluntary, and the case was eventually dismissed.
In another case brought by Brown, Clay was charged with trafficking in cocaine for selling to a confidential witness working for the sheriff’s office in February 2011. He pleaded guilty in that case and received five years probation.
There was also a lawsuit against Brown and the sheriff’s office stemming from a 2010 incident was recently settled for $26,000 in damages to Three Bridges Pawnshop owner Terry Sutton.
Sutton alleged Brown mishandled a situation at his pawnshop and wrongly arrested him. Sutton claimed false arrest, assault and battery, illegal seizure of property and malicious prosecution.
Other discrepancies found in paperwork of cases handled by Brown include leaving out serial numbers from money given to confidential witnesses to purchase drugs and not providing the ID number for the confidential informant.
A recent audit of the sheriff’s office discovered issues with how the office conducts drug buys, revealing the money is not carefully monitored.
Brown applied for a job with the sheriff’s office as early as 2002, but payroll paperwork only dates back to 2004, according to his personnel file obtained by The State Journal through an open records request.
Brown worked under three sheriffs — Ted Collins, Steve Clark and Melton. Collins is now Franklin County judge-executive.
In June 2005, Brown was making $11.50 per hour working as a part-time bailiff. He received two raises while in that position, and in March 2007 was promoted to full-time deputy, receiving $12.93 per hour, or $1,034.62 bi-weekly.
When he resigned Dec. 17, he was earning $1,212 bi-weekly, or $15.15 per hour
here you go again

Frankfort, KY

#5 Apr 5, 2013
well that was the second part of the article sorry.... here's the first......
Mishandled drug buy money leaves impact
Ex-deputy’s alleged tactics, errors spark court disputes
By Lindsey Erdody Published: April 5, 2013 10:21AM
A man accused of drug trafficking in Franklin County recently had two charges dropped, and both involved cases worked by a former Franklin County Sheriff’s deputy who may have been involved in stealing drug money.

In November and December 2011, Deputy Matt Brown coordinated undercover drug deals between a confidential witness and 53-year-old Raymond Plummer.

Plummer allegedly sold two Percocet pills for $60 the first time and the following month sold two Percocet pills for $55.

Plummer also faced drug trafficking charges from selling pills three times in June 2011.

In February, Plummer pleaded guilty to the three sales made in June, but the two trafficking charges handled by Brown were dropped.

After the plea, Commonwealth’s Attorney Larry Cleveland said given the evidence he had, a jury probably would have only convicted Plummer of three counts instead of five.

Plummer was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison.

In the reports made by Brown, obtained by The State Journal through an open records request, Plummer’s race is listed as black on one page and white on another page.

Brown, who worked as a narcotics detective, resigned in December “to pursue a new business opportunity,” according to his resignation letter.

Around the same time, Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton announced money was unaccounted for from the drug investigation funds and there could be criminal activity on the part of an employee.

Melton would not confirm that the employee was Brown, but said the employee involved had resigned.

After Melton discovered the missing money, he asked Kentucky State Police to open an investigation, which is being conducted by the KSP Drug Enforcement/Special Investigations Branch West.

The money was returned in December, but it’s unclear how much was taken.

Plummer’s case is not the only one that has been disputed in court or had errors in filed reports.

In November 2011, there was a suppression hearing for one of the cases against Don’o Clay, who was charged with trafficking in cocaine and three counts of possession of a handgun by a convicted felon.
please unlock

Frankfort, KY

#6 Apr 5, 2013
This Matt Brown treated me like I was a harden criminal just because I was standing in my parents yard while he was arresting somebody. Told me to get in my house or go to jail. I said, FOR WHAT< ALL I'M DOING IS STANDING IN MY YARD, he said that I made him nervous. As I learned more about this THUG WITH A BADGE & GUN, the more I realized that he didn't want me to be a witness to his corruption! I did speak to the Louisville sheriffs deputy who came to get info during THAT BOGUS INVESTIGATION THAT PAT HAD DONE BY HIS FELLOW CRONY. I knew right after I talked to them that they were not going to do anything but help keep Pat from getting sued by the victim of Matt that day. How many others has this THUG done this way. Pat knew d@mn well what Matt was up to but evidently Matt knew a lot on Pat. How in the hell would Matt kept his job after everybody knew what a corrupt wannabe that he is & complained to no avail. Please somebody, I want to read this & I have no way to get out & buy the paper. Thanks!
please unlock

Frankfort, KY

#7 Apr 5, 2013
here you go again wrote:
Clay’s attorney, Ted Shouse, argued Brown illegally searched Clay’s grandmother’s home where Clay had been staying.
According to testimony at the hearing, Brown had received a tip from a confidential source — whose name he couldn’t remember — that Clay was selling cocaine and had firearms in the basement of his grandmother’s house.
Brown went to the house, observed Clay leaving and stopped him. Clay allegedly started causing a disturbance, and Brown arrested him for disorderly conduct.
Shortly after that, Melton arrived at the house.
Brown went to the house and spoke with an elderly man, known to be Clay’s great uncle, and asked for permission to search the home. The man refused and told Brown to wait for Clay’s grandmother, Ann Clay, to return home.
However, Brown and Melton entered the home and stayed there for more than an hour before Ann Clay returned, according to testimony.
In the meantime, two witnesses testified Brown went into the basement, searching for drugs and guns despite not having permission to do so.
Brown denied going into the basement before
receiving consent.
Shouse also argued that Melton forced Ann Clay to sign consent to search forms by telling her she would lose her Section 8 housing if she didn’t.
Melton admitted to telling her she could lose her Section 8 housing by having drugs in the home, but denied doing so to force her to sign the consent form.
Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled to suppress all of the evidence from that incident, saying Ann Clay’s consent was not voluntary, and the case was eventually dismissed.
In another case brought by Brown, Clay was charged with trafficking in cocaine for selling to a confidential witness working for the sheriff’s office in February 2011. He pleaded guilty in that case and received five years probation.
There was also a lawsuit against Brown and the sheriff’s office stemming from a 2010 incident was recently settled for $26,000 in damages to Three Bridges Pawnshop owner Terry Sutton.
Sutton alleged Brown mishandled a situation at his pawnshop and wrongly arrested him. Sutton claimed false arrest, assault and battery, illegal seizure of property and malicious prosecution.
Other discrepancies found in paperwork of cases handled by Brown include leaving out serial numbers from money given to confidential witnesses to purchase drugs and not providing the ID number for the confidential informant.
A recent audit of the sheriff’s office discovered issues with how the office conducts drug buys, revealing the money is not carefully monitored.
Brown applied for a job with the sheriff’s office as early as 2002, but payroll paperwork only dates back to 2004, according to his personnel file obtained by The State Journal through an open records request.
Brown worked under three sheriffs — Ted Collins, Steve Clark and Melton. Collins is now Franklin County judge-executive.
In June 2005, Brown was making $11.50 per hour working as a part-time bailiff. He received two raises while in that position, and in March 2007 was promoted to full-time deputy, receiving $12.93 per hour, or $1,034.62 bi-weekly.
When he resigned Dec. 17, he was earning $1,212 bi-weekly, or $15.15 per hour
Thank you friend. I'm glad you take the time to help strangers. If ya got time, what about the other story about the AUDIT OF THE SHERIFFS DEPT?? THANKS AGAIN.....
here you go again

Frankfort, KY

#8 Apr 5, 2013
State finds cash handling concerns in audit of Sheriff's Office
By Kevin Wheatley Published: April 5, 2013 10:30AM
State auditors have identified some concerns with how the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office handles cash for controlled drug buys, gasoline charges and bank deposits, according to two annual audits released Thursday.

Auditor Adam Edelen’s office examined the sheriff’s fee and tax accounts and found three “significant deficiencies,” which are deemed less severe than material weaknesses but more troubling than deficiencies.

One significant deficiency

involved oversight of the agency’s cash used for undercover drug buys.

The law enforcement agency, at the request of Sheriff Pat Melton, is already being investigated by Kentucky State Police after an unidentified former deputy allegedly stole and later returned some of the money. The investigation is ongoing.

During the fee audit, which covered the 2011 calendar year, auditors found the sheriff’s office withdrew $7,070 for drug buys, of which $5,690 was used. The office withdrew another $11,500 in 2012 for the same purpose and used $11,090, leaving a total balance of $1,790 on Aug. 9, 2012, the audit says.

However, the sheriff’s office only had $1,236 on hand at the time, according to the report. The difference,$554, was covered with $500 that was to be used for undercover buys found in a file drawer,$44 that had been used in a previously unaccounted for drug buy and $10 from a deputy’s personal income, auditors reported.

Auditors made three recommendations in regard to the cash used for undercover drug transactions:

&#957;The sheriff’s office should not hold cash for drug buys when one is not scheduled, but random cash counts should be performed and documented.

&#957;Any cash left over should be promptly deposited in the bank.

&#957;The sheriff’s office should perform monthly reconciliations to verify cash amounts match drug buy requests and money used for undercover deals.

In his written response, Melton said his office now reviews the drug buy account monthly and performs random checks during each quarter. Excess funds are also stored in a secure location at the sheriff’s office, Melton said.

Auditors also tested $58,654 of the $121,939 spent on gasoline in 2011 and found inconsistencies, namely errors when recording odometer readings.

In some cases, deputies either failed to record mileage in consistent, ascending order or used two different cards for one patrol unit, according to the report. In one instance, a deputy recorded his unit number where his odometer readings should have been reported.

Auditors recommended the sheriff’s office:

&#957;Review gasoline purchases monthly to verify charges are reasonable and necessary.

&#957;Verify odometer readings during monthly checks to ensure mileage matches with transactions.

&#957;Implement policies regarding appropriate use of vehicles and gasoline charges, how cards are issued and overseen, and details of disciplinary steps should an employee make inappropriate gasoline charges.

In his response, Melton said gasoline purchases would be reviewed and documented in memos.

Auditors also cited a “lack of segregation of duties” in regard to tax and fee receipts. In both audits, Edelen’s office found one employee in charge of collecting receipts, tabulating daily collections and preparing a daily checkout sheet and deposit slip without oversight.

“The risk of material misstatement due to error or fraud significantly increases when duties are not segregated among employees, and there are no compensating controls in operations,” auditors wrote in the tax audit, which covered April 16, 2011, to April 16, 2012.

Auditors recommended sheriff’s office employees share the accounting responsibilities or Melton establish a procedure to review the final tally. Melton, in his response, said he and another employee would look at receipts for accuracy.
fcf

Frankfort, KY

#9 Apr 5, 2013
Thanks Here You Go Again for posting!
please unlock

Frankfort, KY

#10 Apr 5, 2013
fcf wrote:
Thanks Here You Go Again for posting!
Yeah, not everybody on this site are jerks & want to get the real news out for people to comment on.. Thanks again, Stranger...
i knew it

Frankfort, KY

#11 Apr 6, 2013
yeah but when you speak of his crony azz,and the corrupt work he did on ALL of these drug bust.speaking of the UNTOUCHABLES !!!! they will ALL get away with this crime watch what im saying. and probably sue the hell out of the county&state!!!! and if you make a post about them they will have it deleted quickly!!!!!

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