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sophie bean

Acton, ME

#1 Aug 31, 2008
Are people familiar with this information? I certainly wasn't. I find it absolutely extraordinary.

Regional SWAT Teams in N.H. Under Scrutiny
By Peter Jamison
Valley News Staff Writer

"Bristol, N.H.-- The way into Bristol leads east along Route 104, a country highway with easy turns that skirts the base of Ragged Mountain and runs for a time along the Smith River, past cleared fields, dense forest and tumbledown colonial-style homes. This pastoral landscape hardly seems a fitting backdrop for armored cars and masked men bearing assault rifles.

But it was here, on Aug. 2, 2006, that then-Bristol residents Thomas and Tina Mlodzinski say they were awakened at 3:54 a.m. by a 20-man police SWAT team that broke down their door, handcuffed them in their bedrooms and interrogated them for 90 minutes in their nightclothes. The officers had come for Tina Mlodzinski's son, Michael Rothman, who was arrested on an assault charge that prosecutors later dropped.

The majority of the men who came to the Mlodzinskis' apartment that night were armed with assault rifles and, according to the family, were wearing military-style uniforms. But they had not arrived as members of a public police agency. Instead, they were acting as officers in the Central New Hampshire Special Operations Unit, a nonprofit, regional special operations team with a $90,000-per-year budget and a staff of 85 -- larger than the SWAT team of the Los Angeles Police Department.

The special operations unit, which covers six towns in the Upper Valley, is just one of six such regional teams in the state. All are incorporated as nonprofits and subject only to oversight from governing boards made up of local police chiefs.

While the teams are staffed by professional police officers drawn from the communities they serve, they carry weapons and employ tactics few associate with the small-town cop on the beat.

After years of operating in relative obscurity, the organizations are now coming under greater scrutiny. On July 16, the Mlodzinski family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against members of the Central New Hampshire unit. But 10 days later, a more serious incident thrust another special operations team into the limelight..."

full article:
http://www.vnews.com/08172008/4998325.htm

“Honesty and justice for all”

Since: Sep 07

Location hidden

#2 Aug 31, 2008
There are two sides to everything - Part 1
SWAT Team Assists Hanover
Peter Jamison, Staff Writer
Valley News (White River Junction, Vermont)
August 26, 2008 Tuesday
Daily Edition
Hanover -- More than 20 members of the Central New Hampshire Special Operations Unit converged on Hanover Saturday night to help search for a 58-year-old man with memory problems who had gone on a walk from his home and not returned.
The 85-member unit, a nonprofit regional agency that provides SWAT officers as well as other forms of emergency response to towns in central and western New Hampshire, was called in after Hanover Police officers and the Lebanon Police K-9 unit had spent about two hours looking for the Etna resident without success, Hanover Police Chief Nicholas Giaccone said.
Other outside law-enforcement agencies also aided in the search.
It was the first time the special operations group had been called to an incident in Hanover, Giaccone said. The town's police force contributes five of its employees toward the team's operations and pays $2,500 per year in membership dues. The unit covers about 40 communities, including the Upper Valley towns of Canaan, Enfield, Hanover, Haverhill, Lyme and New London.
Giaccone said the unit played an important role Saturday night by providing searchers to fan out and find the man, who was ultimately discovered by a special operations officer and a Hanover Police officer in a bathroom in Dartmouth's Berry Library at 10:51 p.m., more than five hours after he was first reported missing. The Hanover Police Department had only several officers on duty at the time, he said.
"Our SOU (special operations unit), we use it for manpower," Giaccone said.
Also responding were New Hampshire Fish and Game officials, Grafton County Sheriff's deputies, the Hanover Fire Department and the New Hampshire State Police, which provided a K-9 unit and a helicopter to assist in the search.
Giaccone said that 21 officers with the Central New Hampshire Special Operations Unit responded to the call, along with two of the unit's medical doctors. The chief said he did not know how many members of other agencies were present.
The operatives, who carry high-caliber weapons such as assault rifles on more dangerous missions, carried only their standard duty sidearms during the search, according to Giaccone and Grafton County Sheriff Doug Dutile, who is the unit's treasurer and sits on its board of directors.
"They're not going to carry assault rifles when they're looking for a missing person or a missing child or something like that," Dutile said.
The special operations unit is one of six such regional teams in the state, all of which are incorporated as nonprofits and operate under boards of directors made up of local police chiefs.

“Honesty and justice for all”

Since: Sep 07

Location hidden

#3 Aug 31, 2008
Part 2
The groups have recently come under scrutiny. On July 26, another team covering the southern reaches of the Upper Valley, the Western New Hampshire Special Operations Unit, was involved in an incident that ended with the shooting death of a 53-year-old Charlestown man and the wounding of a state trooper. Officers had come to arrest the man's son for allegedly stealing a Nazi flag and resisting arrest. The incident is now being reviewed by the New Hampshire Attorney General's office.
On July 16, a family of former residents of Bristol, N.H., filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against members of the Central New Hampshire team for unreasonable search and seizure and the use of excessive force during the serving of a 2006 arrest warrant.
Giaccone and Dutile said the successful resolution of the incident on Saturday night in Hanover demonstrates that the team is good for more than just SWAT operations.
While special operations unit officials say the majority of their calls are for dangerous suspects holed up in their houses and the service of high-risk arrest warrants, the unit also provides search- and-rescue services and disaster relief -- the team was called out, for example, after the recent tornado in Epsom, N.H.
"We're not considered just a full-fledged SWAT team," Dutile said.
Yesterday, Giaccone issued a rare police press release detailing the multi-agency search and describing how a doctor from the special operations group was able to direct officers in their search by talking to the man's wife about his "patterns" of wandering.
However, the chief dismissed as "foolish" questions about whether the unusual publicizing of the incident was meant to build public support for the special operations team. Search-and-rescue operations, Giaccone said, "is what they've been designed for."

August 29, 2008
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUser...

“Honesty and justice for all”

Since: Sep 07

Location hidden

#4 Aug 31, 2008
There are two sides to everything - Part 1

SWAT Team Assists Hanover
Peter Jamison, Staff Writer
Valley News (White River Junction, Vermont)
August 26, 2008 Tuesday
Daily Edition

Hanover -- More than 20 members of the Central New Hampshire Special Operations Unit converged on Hanover Saturday night to help search for a 58-year-old man with memory problems who had gone on a walk from his home and not returned.

The 85-member unit, a nonprofit regional agency that provides SWAT officers as well as other forms of emergency response to towns in central and western New Hampshire, was called in after Hanover Police officers and the Lebanon Police K-9 unit had spent about two hours looking for the Etna resident without success, Hanover Police Chief Nicholas Giaccone said.

Other outside law-enforcement agencies also aided in the search.

It was the first time the special operations group had been called to an incident in Hanover, Giaccone said. The town's police force contributes five of its employees toward the team's operations and pays $2,500 per year in membership dues. The unit covers about 40 communities, including the Upper Valley towns of Canaan, Enfield, Hanover, Haverhill, Lyme and New London.

Giaccone said the unit played an important role Saturday night by providing searchers to fan out and find the man, who was ultimately discovered by a special operations officer and a Hanover Police officer in a bathroom in Dartmouth's Berry Library at 10:51 p.m., more than five hours after he was first reported missing. The Hanover Police Department had only several officers on duty at the time, he said.

"Our SOU (special operations unit), we use it for manpower," Giaccone said.

Also responding were New Hampshire Fish and Game officials, Grafton County Sheriff's deputies, the Hanover Fire Department and the New Hampshire State Police, which provided a K-9 unit and a helicopter to assist in the search.

Giaccone said that 21 officers with the Central New Hampshire Special Operations Unit responded to the call, along with two of the unit's medical doctors. The chief said he did not know how many members of other agencies were present.

The operatives, who carry high-caliber weapons such as assault rifles on more dangerous missions, carried only their standard duty sidearms during the search, according to Giaccone and Grafton County Sheriff Doug Dutile, who is the unit's treasurer and sits on its board of directors.

"They're not going to carry assault rifles when they're looking for a missing person or a missing child or something like that," Dutile said.

The special operations unit is one of six such regional teams in the state, all of which are incorporated as nonprofits and operate under boards of directors made up of local police chiefs.

“Honesty and justice for all”

Since: Sep 07

Location hidden

#5 Aug 31, 2008
Gotta love how Topix makes things disappear and reappear.
sophie bean

Saco, ME

#6 Aug 31, 2008
You don't need "Special Ops" / SWAT to do the job appropriately done by Search and Rescue.
If they help out in a search, great. You still don't need to create a unit for that purpose, and that is not their intended purpose, is it?
Also, who pays for it?
The articles state quite clearly that their purpose is that of a SWAT team - a tactical unit designed to go into high-risk situations.

“Honesty and justice for all”

Since: Sep 07

Location hidden

#7 Aug 31, 2008
sophie bean wrote:
You don't need "Special Ops" / SWAT to do the job appropriately done by Search and Rescue.
If they help out in a search, great. You still don't need to create a unit for that purpose, and that is not their intended purpose, is it?
Also, who pays for it?
The articles state quite clearly that their purpose is that of a SWAT team - a tactical unit designed to go into high-risk situations.
Not what they say -(and I am not saying I agree with what they say)

From the article: "While special operations unit officials say the majority of their calls are for dangerous suspects holed up in their houses and the service of high-risk arrest warrants, the unit also provides search- and-rescue services and disaster relief -- the team was called out, for example, after the recent tornado in Epsom, N.H.
"We're not considered just a full-fledged SWAT team," Dutile said. "Search-and-rescue operations", Giaccone said, "is what they've been designed for"."
sophie bean

Saco, ME

#8 Aug 31, 2008
OK, thanks for clarifying. The whole thing just seems weird to me, and not a little scary.
To whom are they answerable when they break down a door in the middle of the night?
Do they write a report? Is it public?
Do they have any oversight at all?
They may well do good - I don't know - my problem is with the lack of public oversight and the high potential for abuse given a lack of public oversight.
Surely I'm not the only one here with this concern?
Shack

United States

#9 Aug 31, 2008
I'll try again....
Sophie, was going to "judge" your Post as "Interesting"...but, was too late...
The haters got there first. Perhaps this "militia" has a compound
in the hills with generators. None of this really surprises me though.
Doesn't it really confirm what we have learned about the area?
ie the Right to keep and bear arms...2nd Amendment....
tradition of local militias......." Defensive vs Offensive...
Then they put on their civilized goodness for the tourists?
Seems to have a bit of a Gestapo undertone to it.
Wowzer

United States

#10 Sep 1, 2008
sophie bean wrote:
OK, thanks for clarifying. The whole thing just seems weird to me, and not a little scary.
To whom are they answerable when they break down a door in the middle of the night?
Do they write a report? Is it public?
Do they have any oversight at all?
They may well do good - I don't know - my problem is with the lack of public oversight and the high potential for abuse given a lack of public oversight.
Surely I'm not the only one here with this concern?
Why is it that you are so concerned if you live in Maine? From your past posts it's apparent you are much more concerned with what happens in NH than what happens in your own state. That is unless you are hiding your true state locality.
truth be known

AOL

#11 Sep 1, 2008
Sophie Bean is related to Liko Kenney the young man who shot and killed Franconia police officer Cpl. N. Bruce McKay
Wowzer

United States

#12 Sep 1, 2008
Shack wrote:
I'll try again....
Sophie, was going to "judge" your Post as "Interesting"...but, was too late...
The haters got there first. Perhaps this "militia" has a compound
in the hills with generators. None of this really surprises me though.
Doesn't it really confirm what we have learned about the area?
ie the Right to keep and bear arms...2nd Amendment....
tradition of local militias......." Defensive vs Offensive...
Then they put on their civilized goodness for the tourists?
Seems to have a bit of a Gestapo undertone to it.
May I ask what you learned about the area?
Wow your dislike for the state and the people of NH keeps spurting out over and over again.
"Civilized goodness for tourists"??? Jeesh!!
Why is it so hard for some of you to believe that people actually love living in the beautiful state of NH?
May I remind the few that have issues with the people and the state and are so unhappy with NH that 93 and 91 go two ways. If you are so unhappy you can always get in your car and head south with no need to look back.
Wowzer

United States

#13 Sep 1, 2008
truth be known wrote:
Sophie Bean is related to Liko Kenney the young man who shot and killed Franconia police officer Cpl. N. Bruce McKay
Really? Isn't that interesting.
truth be known

AOL

#14 Sep 1, 2008
yepper.....it certainly explains this persons position whenever LEO is involved.
sophie bean

Starksboro, VT

#15 Sep 1, 2008
Wowzer and "falsehood be known" - you couldn't be more wrong.

First, I am not in NH, not from NH, but am familiar with NH. As I've said clearly and openly for years, I divide my time between Maine and Vermont. You are welcome to believe any fantasy you'd like, clearly you are both really good at that.

Second, I am in no way related to Liko Kenney or Bodie Miller. I'd never heard of Liko Kenney before May of 2007, and if you were paying attention, you'd realize that I have frequently said that his killing of McKay was no less murder than Floyd's murder of Kenney. Both equally wrong.

My "issues" are not with the people of NH in general or the state as a whole - simply with corruption, abuse, and violence, whatever its source. This can't possibly be so hard to comprehend.

Congratulations, however, on once again avoiding and silencing a perfectly reasonable question.
Wowzer

United States

#16 Sep 1, 2008
sophie bean wrote:
Wowzer and "falsehood be known" - you couldn't be more wrong.
First, I am not in NH, not from NH, but am familiar with NH. As I've said clearly and openly for years, I divide my time between Maine and Vermont. You are welcome to believe any fantasy you'd like, clearly you are both really good at that.
Second, I am in no way related to Liko Kenney or Bodie Miller. I'd never heard of Liko Kenney before May of 2007, and if you were paying attention, you'd realize that I have frequently said that his killing of McKay was no less murder than Floyd's murder of Kenney. Both equally wrong.
My "issues" are not with the people of NH in general or the state as a whole - simply with corruption, abuse, and violence, whatever its source. This can't possibly be so hard to comprehend.
Congratulations, however, on once again avoiding and silencing a perfectly reasonable question.
Thanks for the congrats Sophie but you give me way too much credit. By not answering something that I know little about is not avoiding the question. Since I'm not in LE or a part of the SWAT team I am not qualified to answer for them. I bet though that if you write them and tell them how concerned you are about abuse, corruption and violence they would be happy to answer your questions concerning them.
You also have avoided my question as to why you are so concerned with crimes in NH when you live in Maine and there is more than enough crime, corruption and violence right in your own back yard to keep you busy trying to solve for a very long time.
So tell me Sophie why is it that you have been trying so hard to blacken the eye of NH? I don't believe for a minute it is because you are Sophie the crime and corruption fighter.
Umm, Sophie I think you are a little confused though about who is good at believing in fantasy. Wasn't it you not long ago that was seeing serial killers behind every tree in the forests of NH?
sophie bean

Starksboro, VT

#17 Sep 1, 2008
OK, fine, if the citizens of NH are perfectly happy having off-the-books paramlitary groups operating all over the state, that is your "choice."

I still notice that you persist in ignoring the fact that I have never said that Liko Kenney was a totally innocent victim. Guess that would blow your 'theory' of my wanting to 'blacken the eye of NH' out of the water, can't have that.

I also definitely notice that no one has yet apologized for the truly disgusting lie that I'm concerned about this "because she lives in NH and is related to LK." High marks for credibilitiy and decency there.
paris

Saint Paul, MN

#18 Sep 1, 2008
sophie bean wrote:
OK, thanks for clarifying. The whole thing just seems weird to me, and not a little scary.
To whom are they answerable when they break down a door in the middle of the night?
Do they write a report? Is it public?
Do they have any oversight at all?
They may well do good - I don't know - my problem is with the lack of public oversight and the high potential for abuse given a lack of public oversight.
Surely I'm not the only one here with this concern?
This is what happened here 7 months ago and there are alot of mixed feelings about what took place that night.
I can see what Sophie Bean is trying to say. You're taking it personal is fair, but she was just looking for meaning. Good article here:
http://wcco.com/iteam/swat.team.honored.2.783...
Wowzer

United States

#19 Sep 1, 2008
sophie bean wrote:
OK, fine, if the citizens of NH are perfectly happy having off-the-books paramlitary groups operating all over the state, that is your "choice."
I still notice that you persist in ignoring the fact that I have never said that Liko Kenney was a totally innocent victim. Guess that would blow your 'theory' of my wanting to 'blacken the eye of NH' out of the water, can't have that.
I also definitely notice that no one has yet apologized for the truly disgusting lie that I'm concerned about this "because she lives in NH and is related to LK." High marks for credibilitiy and decency there.
I don't know af anywhere in NH where there are any off-the-books paramilitary groups operating all over the state. Honestly Sophie this isn't very credible information. You really should know the meaning before making such a statement.
SWAT is made up of of LE officers trained to protect law abiding citizens.
Paramilitary groups are made up mostly of civilians organized to function like or assist a military unit. Do they ever screw up? Of course they do as they are human. They also do much good.
The fact that you never said that Liko Kenney was a totally innocent victim doesn't concern me in the least. What has that got to do with anything here? An apology for the statement that you're related to Liko was not mine so I owe you nothing. I wonder though if the people of NH will ever get an apology for all the names they've been called and the horrible things that were said about them and their state by a certain few.
Wowzer

United States

#20 Sep 1, 2008
paris wrote:
<quoted text>This is what happened here 7 months ago and there are alot of mixed feelings about what took place that night.
I can see what Sophie Bean is trying to say. You're taking it personal is fair, but she was just looking for meaning. Good article here:
http://wcco.com/iteam/swat.team.honored.2.783...
After reading the article I can certainly understand why there is mixed feelings.
I hope Sophie sees this too as she seems to think that these things only happen in NH.

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