New ESC manager: I can empathize with the unemployed

Mar 14, 2010 | Posted by: boomslang | Full story: www2.mcdowellnews.com

As McDowell continues to cope with high jobless rates and folks struggling to get by, the new manager of the local ESC office hopes his staff can help these people find new opportunities.

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41 - 54 of 54 Comments Last updated Apr 28, 2010
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BBG

Morganton, NC

#42 Mar 17, 2010
Avery wrote:
<quoted text> I have given a lot of thought to what can be done and just keep coming back to the same solutions. Parents need to be far more involved in guiding their children to be more positive and more than anything refuse to let them quite school. The schools need to put even more effort into keeping kids in school. The Legislature needs to pass stronger laws that force every student to stay in school, at least until they are eighteen or graduate. Businesses need to stop taking advantage of this cheap labor pool and not hire them. Its hard to convience a young person that wants a car or cellphone not to quite school. A special board needs to be set up within the schoolboard to brainstorm for solutions. We are not the only county having this problem, but until it is solved we will not see companies knocking down our doors to locate here. Our kids go to college and never return or they go into the military and find jobs elsewhere. Far to many young people are painting themselves into a corner for life. Teen pregnancies are still playing a large role in this problem. Single Moms with a twenty year sentence of poverty. I am aggravated that this problem has not been put on the front burner and left there until it is solved.
I agree with everything you say! Other things are that kids are going to want things, so they need jobs they can do from over the age of 10years old. I worked as a child and I learned to manage my money. My first job was to sell Christmas cards and stationary door to door. I enjoyed that very much. Often the people I sold to offered me other jobs such as helping in their yard or around their home, dog washing, dog walking, running errands for them, etc. By the time I was 15 I was mending clothes, ironing, even sewing and designing skirts and blouses for some of the women. By the time I was 18 I was designing hand knitted things that sold for a small fortune. I was about the only person who did knitting. At 20 I was teaching classes of how to knit and crochet. People signed up for those classes, so many we sometimes had to split the classes. I met people and listened to their ideas. I found that writing patterns for knitting in plain English rather than the standard abreviations was even more profitable than knitting and selling the finished goods, once my students got to the point they could complete garments. I kept an open mind and when someone told me how to buy a house and fix it up to sell, while living in it, I could live more or less rent free once the house was sold. I taught, but mostly I learned by being around energetic, educated people who could make things happen by just their work. People would say, so and so said you wanted a house. Do you have $800 bucks for the closing? If so, I'll finance the rest for you. I learned how to do that with cars, too, finding those who would work and fix them up right the first time (1 out of 50 people are honest or educated enough to do that) and learned to ride free after getting to drive them for awhile then selling them. Management is as important as work.
BBG

Morganton, NC

#43 Mar 17, 2010
Avery wrote:
<quoted text> I have given a lot of thought to what can be done and just keep coming back to the same solutions. Parents need to be far more involved in guiding their children to be more positive and more than anything refuse to let them quite school. The schools need to put even more effort into keeping kids in school. The Legislature needs to pass stronger laws that force every student to stay in school, at least until they are eighteen or graduate. Businesses need to stop taking advantage of this cheap labor pool and not hire them. Its hard to convience a young person that wants a car or cellphone not to quite school. A special board needs to be set up within the schoolboard to brainstorm for solutions. We are not the only county having this problem, but until it is solved we will not see companies knocking down our doors to locate here. Our kids go to college and never return or they go into the military and find jobs elsewhere. Far to many young people are painting themselves into a corner for life. Teen pregnancies are still playing a large role in this problem. Single Moms with a twenty year sentence of poverty. I am aggravated that this problem has not been put on the front burner and left there until it is solved.
Another thing about school is that vocational skills should be offered for those that aren't interested or able to do scholastics. I had to stay in school because my mother depended on my VA and SS checks. I knew that if I quit or got thrown out, I'd be sent away. Another thing is she told me if I got pregnant like some of the girls in my class that I WOULD have an abortion. I didn't believe in that so I did not get pregnant either. I knew that our home had rules and even though I was able to go by the rules, I emancipated at age 17 to go to another state for the benefits of using the VA hospital and for more education in a design school.
BBG

Morganton, NC

#44 Mar 17, 2010
BBG wrote:
<quoted text> I agree with everything you say! Other things are that kids are going to want things, so they need jobs they can do from over the age of 10years old. I worked as a child and I learned to manage my money. My first job was to sell Christmas cards and stationary door to door. I enjoyed that very much. Often the people I sold to offered me other jobs such as helping in their yard or around their home, dog washing, dog walking, running errands for them, etc. By the time I was 15 I was mending clothes, ironing, even sewing and designing skirts and blouses for some of the women. By the time I was 18 I was designing hand knitted things that sold for a small fortune. I was about the only person who did knitting. At 20 I was teaching classes of how to knit and crochet. People signed up for those classes, so many we sometimes had to split the classes. I met people and listened to their ideas. I found that writing patterns for knitting in plain English rather than the standard abreviations was even more profitable than knitting and selling the finished goods, once my students got to the point they could complete garments. I kept an open mind and when someone told me how to buy a house and fix it up to sell, while living in it, I could live more or less rent free once the house was sold. I taught, but mostly I learned by being around energetic, educated people who could make things happen by just their work. People would say, so and so said you wanted a house. Do you have $800 bucks for the closing? If so, I'll finance the rest for you. I learned how to do that with cars, too, finding those who would work and fix them up right the first time (1 out of 50 people are honest or educated enough to do that) and learned to ride free after getting to drive them for awhile then selling them. Management is as important as work.
Outside the Army Corp of Engineers, my father never had a job in his life. But he paid taxes on a lot of money, earning much more than bankers, factory workers, etc. When he got out of the army he bought 2 old cars, as cars were just getting back on the road after a gas shortage. He parked the cars on the street in Lenoir where he lived in a rented loft above a storefront. He sold those cars and bought two more, taking the profit and using it to pay his bills. Soon he had a partner and within a while his partner bought the Buick dealership and my father bought property from the Broyhill family and build a house with a large front yard. I remember that yard being full of cars, tractors, lawnmowers, even cows and horses sometimes being tied in the yard for sale. People came by needing a car, but having no money so he put them to work in the yard or washing and waxing cars or using a tractor to work on his adjoining land where he later built a car lot. He traded for his insurance, our clothes, labor, dental work, doctor bills, etc. And he sold, too. I guess our home was the home of the first "yard" sale, but he did well. Later he build a little cinder block building and a cement pond that he stoked with minnows. The building had worms, lizzards, crickets, expensive rods and reels and other fishing equipment. That was my job. I was 8 years old and people started beating on our door at 3:00 am. I mean rich people. I'd roll out of the bed and go open up the shop and although I hated lizzards I'd catch them and box them up and sell them by the dozens along with minnows and worms and fishing equipment. I remember one time selling a man hundreds of dollars of stuff and Dad gave me a hundred dollar bill. He told me that was more money that most people made working in the shop for a week back then. I'll never forget the total high I felt at earning that money even though Saturday and Sunday mornings were nothing but lizzards and creepy crawly things.
BBG

Morganton, NC

#45 Mar 17, 2010
Times were hard sometimes back then. When the mills and shops were on short time Dad would tell people to come on over and help out at the house. If they owed a car payment he'd get them to mop, wax, and buff the floors in our house or find them work doing that at one of the dealerships so they could earn enough to pay their car payment. One guy would drive my mother around on days when he didn't have work in the mill where he worked. He'd take her to Charlotte or Winston shopping. Back then people would work and work out their bills if they didn't have money. Sometimes Dad would come home with a freezer full of meat or boxes of home canned foods that he'd been offered in payment. Dad didn't even know how to change a spark plug, yet he had people lined up to do good mechanical work for him so that his cars ran. He didn't even know how to plug in a skill saw, if they'd had one back then, yet he build several homes and buildings from bartered labor. Today unfortunately everyone wants to have nice things, on credit they can't pay back. Me, I don't do credit. I just ask what can I trade you for a couple hundred bucks and always someone laughs and tells me something they want. I get it and make a little profit and keep the shit moving.
Gregg

Candler, NC

#46 Mar 18, 2010
BBG wrote:
Times were hard sometimes back then. When the mills and shops were on short time Dad would tell people to come on over and help out at the house. If they owed a car payment he'd get them to mop, wax, and buff the floors in our house or find them work doing that at one of the dealerships so they could earn enough to pay their car payment. One guy would drive my mother around on days when he didn't have work in the mill where he worked. He'd take her to Charlotte or Winston shopping. Back then people would work and work out their bills if they didn't have money. Sometimes Dad would come home with a freezer full of meat or boxes of home canned foods that he'd been offered in payment. Dad didn't even know how to change a spark plug, yet he had people lined up to do good mechanical work for him so that his cars ran. He didn't even know how to plug in a skill saw, if they'd had one back then, yet he build several homes and buildings from bartered labor. Today unfortunately everyone wants to have nice things, on credit they can't pay back. Me, I don't do credit. I just ask what can I trade you for a couple hundred bucks and always someone laughs and tells me something they want. I get it and make a little profit and keep the shit moving.
Who gives a big ol rat's azz?
BBG

Morganton, NC

#47 Mar 18, 2010
Gregg wrote:
<quoted text>
Who gives a big ol rat's azz?
You must! You posted back. You don't need a job, you just need to make money by using your brains.
shy

Cedar Rapids, IA

#48 Apr 4, 2010
NAFTA and the push into China by American banks and businesses have ruined employment for the small-town South. Also we have aborted our consumers while they were still in the womb. No consumers=no demand. There is a just God who rewards righteousness and punishes disobedience. Is it now the USA's time to reap for 40 million murders?
Ricky Mortis

Morganton, NC

#49 Apr 27, 2010
hi there wrote:
we both draw un enployment been drawing for over a year now and we went into farming we have 5 females 4 bulls 56 chickens which we sell the eggs and chicks we also have a side business of taxidermy. so we do ok plus i get medicaid and social security for my daughter and my husband get's a ssi check for his son! so we make it just fine.people can get by the esc if they are just smart enough to keep there mouth shut like we have.
Can you tell us more about how to do this? It might be a right nice government bailout. Thanks for printing this here.
Ricky Mortis

Morganton, NC

#50 Apr 27, 2010
merry christmas wrote:
<quoted text>sing to the tune of here comes santa clause.here come the mexicans ,here come the mexicans,crossing the border fence,they're gonna come and take your job and work for fifty cents, they;ll send their money to mexico this much I know is true ,and Mr, obama knows about it but he dont give a dern about you . Here come the mexicans ,here come the mexicans,oh yes here they come their gonna come and take your job and your gonna be a bum ,they'll send their money to mexico back to their familys while you stay here in america and live in poverty ,Here come the mexicans, here come the mexicans ,crossing two by two ,they'll come across that border line and take your job from you ,you'll have no money to pay your rent and no electicity,and when it comes to christmas time no presents under your tree...
How do they send their money to Mexico? Do they have post offices there?
Allen

Saint Cloud, FL

#51 Apr 28, 2010
The unemployment rate is still very high.
Astute Observer

United States

#52 Apr 28, 2010
Allen wrote:
The unemployment rate is still very high.
Yes it is. Our leaders here in McDowell County need to get off their duffs & start looking out for our county, not their own little special interests. Go to a Commissioners meeting and you will become very enlightened to the fact that they haven't seen the ball since kick off as far as leadership skills go!! Vote 'em all out!!
Astute Observer

United States

#53 Apr 28, 2010
This past thread alone should give everyone a close look at what our "leaders" have done to help recruit industry & such to the county. What a joke! No updates since 2003 until it came to light on Toxix!!!
http://www.topix.com/forum/city/marion-nc/T69...
NotRight

Franklin, NC

#54 Apr 28, 2010
Astute Observer wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes it is. Our leaders here in McDowell County need to get off their duffs & start looking out for our county, not their own little special interests. Go to a Commissioners meeting and you will become very enlightened to the fact that they haven't seen the ball since kick off as far as leadership skills go!! Vote 'em all out!!
Blaming the leaders will not work. We have had several sets of leaders over the past years and that did not help. The problem is in the mirror. People make the place and negative thinking and many other poor attitude related problems have and will continue to drive potential employers off.
Astute Observer

United States

#55 Apr 28, 2010
NotRight wrote:
<quoted text>
Blaming the leaders will not work. We have had several sets of leaders over the past years and that did not help. The problem is in the mirror. People make the place and negative thinking and many other poor attitude related problems have and will continue to drive potential employers off.
On that I call BS! Must have hit a 'nerve' with MEDA...lol!!!

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