Whats wrong with the USA?
HIFLYR

United States

#21 Jul 14, 2012
Give Me a Break wrote:
<quoted text>
Until WalMart decides to get into the delivery business in 'Right-to-Work' States and all of a sudden we can ship goods for less than 1/2 what UPS charges so that they can pay the high salaries that the Teamsters demand. Who do you think is paying the premium wage that a UPS truck driver makes just because he is a Teamster. You are, buddy.
Ok let see if I have this right you hate something legal like unions but embrace the illegals. You think every American not in a management position should make walmart wages. Did I miss anything?
ThomasA

Wattsville, AL

#22 Jul 14, 2012
Give Me a Break wrote:
<quoted text>
Until WalMart decides to get into the delivery business in 'Right-to-Work' States and all of a sudden we can ship goods for less than 1/2 what UPS charges so that they can pay the high salaries that the Teamsters demand. Who do you think is paying the premium wage that a UPS truck driver makes just because he is a Teamster. You are, buddy.
Compare the output and productivity of UPS ,Fed Ex,and USPS. Who makes the most money for the company AND the drivers and who does the best job? Who gives the best,fastest service for a competitive price with the other two? Some of you are too young to remember the days when the only choice was Railway Express and the now called USPS. We are in the "good ole days".
Give Me a Break

Foley, AL

#23 Jul 14, 2012
HIFLYR wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok let see if I have this right you hate something legal like unions but embrace the illegals. You think every American not in a management position should make walmart wages. Did I miss anything?
No, you didn't miss anything.
ThomasA

Gadsden, AL

#24 Jul 18, 2012
HIFLYR wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok let see if I have this right you hate something legal like unions but embrace the illegals. You think every American not in a management position should make walmart wages. Did I miss anything?
The unions have magical powers that turn a tiger into a sloth.
Hellsbells

Jasper, TN

#25 Jun 7, 2013
Give Me a Break wrote:
"And you and all the Dems that kiss the unions asses should also be on that burning pile. Looks like your chickens have come home to roost."
I hope you are not referring to me because I hate Unions. The Unions are what has sent all of our jobs overseas. I think that Unions ought to be outlawed.
So what has organized union labor done for you?
Hellsbells

Jasper, TN

#26 Jun 7, 2013
Curious wrote:
<quoted text>
Strong yes, and they are terrible to work for. I was married to a UPS guy and the Teamsters SUCK. As do all unions. And to the people who hate Walmart, if it wasn't for them I'd be walking around naked and starving. Thank God for freedom and choices in the USA as to where and how we spend our money.
Ever thought about spending that money where you earned it? In america. Try to find an american made piece of clothing at walmart. You are part of the problem. Keep buying foreign made shit and soon another plant will pack up and go overseas. Blame that one on the union too.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#27 Jun 7, 2013
The essence of what labor unions do—give workers a stronger voice so that they can get a fair share of the economic growth they help create—is and has always been important to making the economy work for all Americans. And unions only become more important as the economy worsens.
One of the primarily reasons why our current recession endures is that workers do not have the purchasing power they need to drive our economy. Even when times were relatively good, workers were getting squeezed. Income for the median working age household fell by about $2,000 between 2000 and 2007, and it could fall even further as the economy continues to decline. Consumer activity accounts for roughly 70 percent of our nation’s economy, and for a while workers were able to use debt to sustain their consumption. Yet debt-driven consumption is not sustainable, as we are plainly seeing.
What is sustainable is an economy where workers are adequately rewarded and have the income they need to purchase goods. This is where unions come in.
Unions paved the way to the middle class for millions of American workers and pioneered benefits such as paid health care and pensions along the way. Even today, union workers earn significantly more on average than their non-union counterparts, and union employers are more likely to provide benefits. And non-union workers—particularly in highly unionized industries—receive financial benefits from employers who increase wages to match what unions would win in order to avoid unionization.
Unfortunately, declining unionization rates mean that workers are less likely to receive good wages and be rewarded for their increases in productivity. The Employee Free Choice Act, which is likely to be one of the most important issues debated by the 111th Congress, holds the promise of boosting unionization rates and improving millions of Americans’ economic standing and workplace conditions.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#28 Jun 7, 2013
Unions help workers achieve higher wages
Union members in the United States earn significantly more than non-union workers. Over the four-year period between 2004 and 2007, unionized workers’ wages were on average 11.3 percent higher than non-union workers with similar characteristics. That means that, all else equal, American workers that join a union will earn 11.3 percent more—or $2.26 more per hour in 2008 dollars—than their otherwise identical non-union counterparts.
Yet union coverage rates have been declining for several decades. In 1983, 23.3 percent of American workers were either members of a union or represented by a union at their workplace. By 2008, that portion declined to 13.7 percent.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#29 Jun 7, 2013
American workers’ wage growth lags as productivity increases
Workers helped the economy grow during this time period by becoming ever more productive, but they received only a small share of the new wealth they helped create. Throughout the middle part of the 20th century—a period when unions were stronger—American workers generated economic growth by increasing their productivity, and they were rewarded with higher wages. But this link between greater productivity and higher wages has broken down.
Prior to the 1980s, productivity gains and workers’ wages moved in tandem: as workers produced more per hour, they saw a commensurate increase in their earnings. Yet wages and productivity growth have decoupled since the late 1970s. Looking from 1980 to 2008, nationwide worker productivity grew by 75.0 percent, while workers’ inflation-adjusted average wages increased by only 22.6 percent, which means that workers were compensated for only 30.2 percent of their productivity gains.
The cost of benefits—especially health insurance—has increased over time and now accounts for a greater share of total compensation than in the past, but this increase is nowhere near enough to account for the discrepancy between wage and productiv¬ity growth. For example, according to analysis by the Center for Economic and Policy Research, between 1973 and 2006 the share of labor compensation in the form of benefits rose from 12.6 percent to 19.5 percent.
If American workers were rewarded for 100 percent of their increases in labor productivity between 1980 and 2008—as they were during the middle part of the 20th century—average wages would be $28.53 per hour—42.7 percent higher than the average real wage in 2008.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#30 Jun 7, 2013
Unionization rewards workers for productivity growth
Slow wage growth has squeezed the middle class and contributed to rising inequality. But increasing union coverage rates could likely reverse these trends as more Americans would benefit from the union wage premium and receive higher wages. If unionization rates were the same now as they were in 1983 and the current union wage premium remained constant, new union workers would earn an estimated $49.0 billion more in wages and salaries per year. If union coverage rates increased by just 5 percentage points over current levels, newly unionized workers would earn an estimated $25.5 billion more in wages and salaries per year. Non-union workers would also benefit as employers would likely raise wages to match what unions would win in order to avoid unionization.
Increased unionization would boost Americans’ annual wages
Union employers are also significantly more likely to provide benefits to their employees. Union workers nationwide are 28.2 percent more likely to be covered by employer-provided health insurance and 53.9 percent more likely to have employer-provided pensions compared to workers with similar characteristics who were not in unions.
Conclusion
Nearly three out of five survey respondents from a Peter Hart Research Associates poll report that they would join a union if they could, but workers attempting to unionize currently face a hostile legal environment and are commonly intimidated by aggressive antiunion employers. The Employee Free Choice Act would help workers who want to join a union do so by ensuring fairness in the union selection process with three main provisions: workers would have a fair and direct path to join unions through a simple major¬ity sign-up; employers who break the rules governing the unionization process would face stiffer penalties; and a first contract mediation and arbitration process would be intro¬duced to thwart bad-faith bargaining.
Passing the Employee Free Choice Act and making it harder for management to threaten workers seeking to unionize would be good for American workers. It would help boost workers’ wages and benefits. And putting more money in workers’ pockets would provide a needed boost for the U.S. economy. Increasing unionization is a good way to get out of our current economic troubles.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#31 Jun 7, 2013
The essence of what labor unions do—give workers a stronger voice so that they can get a fair share of the economic growth they help create—is and has always been important to making the economy work for all Americans. And unions only become more important as the economy worsens.
One of the primarily reasons why our current recession endures is that workers do not have the purchasing power they need to drive our economy. Even when times were relatively good, workers were getting squeezed. Income for the median working age household fell by about $2,000 between 2000 and 2007, and it could fall even further as the economy continues to decline. Consumer activity accounts for roughly 70 percent of our nation’s economy, and for a while workers were able to use debt to sustain their consumption. Yet debt-driven consumption is not sustainable, as we are plainly seeing.
What is sustainable is an economy where workers are adequately rewarded and have the income they need to purchase goods. This is where unions come in.
Unions paved the way to the middle class for millions of American workers and pioneered benefits such as paid health care and pensions along the way. Even today, union workers earn significantly more on average than their non-union counterparts, and union employers are more likely to provide benefits. And non-union workers—particularly in highly unionized industries—receive financial benefits from employers who increase wages to match what unions would win in order to avoid unionization.
Unfortunately, declining unionization rates mean that workers are less likely to receive good wages and be rewarded for their increases in productivity. The Employee Free Choice Act, which is likely to be one of the most important issues debated by the 111th Congress, holds the promise of boosting unionization rates and improving millions of Americans’ economic standing and workplace conditions.
Unions help workers achieve higher wages
Union members in the United States earn significantly more than non-union workers. Over the four-year period between 2004 and 2007, unionized workers’ wages were on average 11.3 percent higher than non-union workers with similar characteristics. That means that, all else equal, American workers that join a union will earn 11.3 percent more—or $2.26 more per hour in 2008 dollars—than their otherwise identical non-union counterparts.
Yet union coverage rates have been declining for several decades. In 1983, 23.3 percent of American workers were either members of a union or represented by a union at their workplace. By 2008, that portion declined to 13.7 percent.
Now what

Jasper, TN

#32 Jun 7, 2013
Posted that one twice. My bad
thetruth

Dawsonville, GA

#33 Jun 7, 2013
Now how about coming up with an opinion of your own, instead of the copy and paste that you just done.
FastFred

Foley, AL

#35 Jun 8, 2013
The Auto. Industry is a sore spot with me, are you glad we wasted money bailing them out ? Here's how you are going to be paid back, Chevy made in China, along with with Chrysler making a deal to move a couple of the Jeep brands to China, and they are already having talks with Russia and plan to open a facility there.The most popular pick up, Ford F150 is made every where but here and has been for yrs. The Governments list of what qualifies a vehicle to be American made might surprise you, Toyota is # 1 and Honda is # 2. Why? Because they use more American workers to build these vehicles. There is no question that the Unions hurt the Auto. Industry and still do, that's why production is being moved out of the Country so they can compete on price because of cheaper Labor. The Unions have priced there self out of business.
FastFred

Foley, AL

#36 Jun 8, 2013
If our Government succeeds in privatizing the Mail Industry and UPS or FEDEX ends up with it,you won't like them long, the price of sending a Letter or Package will increase drastically.
Give Me a Break

Foley, AL

#37 Jun 8, 2013
FastFred speaks a lot of truth. He is somewhat wrong about where car companies build cars. If cheap labor is the reason, according to FastFred, for American car companies to build cars overseas then it is irrational to think that Toyota and Honda are building their cars here because of the cheap labor. Basically, companies build cars where they sell them. And, FastFred is right about the auto industry and the Postal Service. The auto companies and the Postal Service have given far to much in Union Contracts. I say to the Unions: Shape up or ship out and stop giving bogus reasons for your existence while at the same time pricing companies out of business with your demands. Why do you think your numbers are decreasing if you are such a godsend? Let the marketplace and competition determine what companies pay their employees. Costco pays their employees a lot more money than Sam's Club and they are doing fine. Sam's Club is hurting and neither one of them is unionized so you can't say that Costco is paying employees more because they are Unionized.
FastFred

Foley, AL

#38 Jun 8, 2013
Give Me a Break wrote:
FastFred speaks a lot of truth. He is somewhat wrong about where car companies build cars. If cheap labor is the reason, according to FastFred, for American car companies to build cars overseas then it is irrational to think that Toyota and Honda are building their cars here because of the cheap labor. Basically, companies build cars where they sell them. And, FastFred is right about the auto industry and the Postal Service. The auto companies and the Postal Service have given far to much in Union Contracts. I say to the Unions: Shape up or ship out and stop giving bogus reasons for your existence while at the same time pricing companies out of business with your demands. Why do you think your numbers are decreasing if you are such a godsend? Let the marketplace and competition determine what companies pay their employees. Costco pays their employees a lot more money than Sam's Club and they are doing fine. Sam's Club is hurting and neither one of them is unionized so you can't say that Costco is paying employees more because they are Unionized.
I stand to be corrected on this, but from memory in 2010, General Motors cost were about 75 dollars and hour to build vs Toyota's 42 dollars and hour, it shows the difference in labor costs, and that cost is reduced when GM builds out of the Country.
Give Me a Break

Foley, AL

#39 Jun 8, 2013
"I stand to be corrected on this, but from memory in 2010, General Motors cost were about 75 dollars and hour to build vs Toyota's 42 dollars and hour, it shows the difference in labor costs, and that cost is reduced when GM builds out of the Country.'

When the Government helped bale out GM, they forced the auto Union to make a lot of concessions. One of them was a big cut in pay for new hirees and the elimination of the then existent pension plan for new employees. This put GM's pay scale and other benefits somewhat (but not totally) in alignment with future goals of GM's success. And, so far it has worked. Thousands of GM workers still have jobs and lots of companies and towns that depended on GM are still alive and thousands of would-be unemployed are not unemployed and thus saving the tax payer money. Yes, the Government is still in the hole for the bale-out but compare that to the cost of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars and it is just a drop in the bucket. GM is doing good and I wish them continued success.
Lol

Jasper, TN

#40 Jun 9, 2013
FastFred wrote:
The Auto. Industry is a sore spot with me, are you glad we wasted money bailing them out ? Here's how you are going to be paid back, Chevy made in China, along with with Chrysler making a deal to move a couple of the Jeep brands to China, and they are already having talks with Russia and plan to open a facility there.The most popular pick up, Ford F150 is made every where but here and has been for yrs. The Governments list of what qualifies a vehicle to be American made might surprise you, Toyota is # 1 and Honda is # 2. Why? Because they use more American workers to build these vehicles. There is no question that the Unions hurt the Auto. Industry and still do, that's why production is being moved out of the Country so they can compete on price because of cheaper Labor. The Unions have priced there self out of business.
Companies move there operations out of the country because of people like yourself that by foreign goods all the time. Cause theyre cheaper. Im a union member and i damn well try to spend my money where i earned it. You cant always do that but when i can i do. How long has it been since youve looked at the lable on something to see where it was made intead of the price tag? Ever drove out of your way to get gas at an american station instead of punjabi? I and all my union brothers go out of our way to do that. Bet u and yours dont. Till you do youre part of the problem buddy.
Give Me a Break

Foley, AL

#41 Jun 9, 2013
Lol wrote:
<quoted text>
Companies move there operations out of the country because of people like yourself that by foreign goods all the time. Cause theyre cheaper. Im a union member and i damn well try to spend my money where i earned it. You cant always do that but when i can i do. How long has it been since youve looked at the lable on something to see where it was made intead of the price tag? Ever drove out of your way to get gas at an american station instead of punjabi? I and all my union brothers go out of our way to do that. Bet u and yours dont. Till you do youre part of the problem buddy.
Many manufacturers had to move their operations overseas because Union wages only gave them two choices: Go out of business or go overseas. You have met the problem and it is you--think about it.

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