Boone Co. getting first soup kitchen

Boone Co. getting first soup kitchen

There are 31 comments on the Cincinnati.com story from Jul 16, 2011, titled Boone Co. getting first soup kitchen. In it, Cincinnati.com reports that:

First soup kitchen coming to Boone County Comments Cindy Schroeder How to help To volunteer or to make a donation, go to www.maryrosemission.org or send your donation to The Mary Rose Mission, P.O. Box 76533, Highland Heights, KY 41076-0533. For information, call 859-292-0300. More FLORENCE - The nonprofit Mary Rose Mission, which started as a ...

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Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#21 Aug 5, 2011
I disagree because the original dollars invested are what we are talking about and this method requires that additional or new dollars be infused to replenish them; hence what is being sustained might be the program, but not the original dollars invested. You are making my point for me by what you write. Therefore, find a way for the original dollars to sustain themselves without new monies being applied. That is sustainment, not looking at new money to keep the kitchen going; for if no new money is donated, the kitchen runs out and so does the communal assistance. Any substance with a finite life is a use it or loose it situation. Food is no different no matter what you are doing with it, where it is going, or for what purpose. Like I said twice, when it is gone, so is the assistance. Thanks for the reply Paul.
Paul Templeton wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree in part. Yes we need to invest in long term solutions such as job training, educational outreach programs ect, but in the mean time there are children and families going hungry.
I don't agree that the funds run out because with ongoing fundraising efforts new donors step in.
Here in Newport we have the Henry Hosea House and it has been feeding children and adults for over 20 years now.
Any effective solutions encompass the immediate need as well as long term goals.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#22 Aug 5, 2011
Philanthropy work better wrote:
And here is another brilliant comment written without reason. If they had food stamps to begin with, they would not be at the soup kitchen, ya think?
Topix is not moderated for the most part, so it is pretty tough to have any kind of an intelligent discussion without a barrage of people who's only goals are to disrupt and degrade.
However;
I agree that education for the parents has to be part of a long term solution, but we still need the services that address the short term immediate problem of hunger.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#23 Aug 5, 2011
Philanthropy work better wrote:
I disagree because the original dollars invested are what we are talking about and this method requires that additional or new dollars be infused to replenish them; hence what is being sustained might be the program, but not the original dollars invested. You are making my point for me by what you write. Therefore, find a way for the original dollars to sustain themselves without new monies being applied. That is sustainment, not looking at new money to keep the kitchen going; for if no new money is donated, the kitchen runs out and so does the communal assistance. Any substance with a finite life is a use it or loose it situation. Food is no different no matter what you are doing with it, where it is going, or for what purpose. Like I said twice, when it is gone, so is the assistance. Thanks for the reply Paul.
<quoted text>
If a program with "self sustaining dollars' is your goal than perhaps it would be better to invest the original funds and use only the interest to sustain the program. Many foundations are run this way.
It would require a much bigger original investment though.
Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#24 Aug 6, 2011
There ya go, now you’re getting what I am talking about. Helping others is good, but there are ways to do even more when you use your noodle to make the soup. Also, most corporations will not contribute to such ventures; unless they do sustain themselves and view unsustained projects as a waste of money, not a worthy enough cause to get involved
Paul Templeton wrote:
<quoted text>
If a program with "self sustaining dollars' is your goal than perhaps it would be better to invest the original funds and use only the interest to sustain the program. Many foundations are run this way.
It would require a much bigger original investment though.
welfare reform

Cincinnati, OH

#25 Aug 6, 2011
Philanthropy work better wrote:
And here is another brilliant comment written without reason. If they had food stamps to begin with, they would not be at the soup kitchen, ya think?
So, tell me what do you think they do with their food stamps--if they are eating at a soup kitchen then its pretty clear they are not buying food.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#26 Aug 6, 2011
welfare reform wrote:
<quoted text>
So, tell me what do you think they do with their food stamps--if they are eating at a soup kitchen then its pretty clear they are not buying food.
Does it matter?
That is like assuming that because a man is broke, he blew all his money or because a man is unemployed, he got fired for incompetence.
The reasons are many. Some are understandable and some not so understandable.
Do we deny all because some may not be deserving?
Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#27 Aug 7, 2011
You keep saying they have food stamps, but nothing but your words suggest it. Seems to me you are in the minority opinion without facts, just speculation. How could anybody know what people on stamps do with them anyway. Sure, some abuse them, but others are in need of them. If you can figure out the difference, report them. Otherwise, stick to the topic we are discussing, that of getting more for dollars invested, not food stamps. You sound like a broken record, fffffooood,,ssstttaaamps. Not a clllluuuuee.
welfare reform wrote:
<quoted text>
So, tell me what do you think they do with their food stamps--if they are eating at a soup kitchen then its pretty clear they are not buying food.
Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#28 Aug 7, 2011
You can understand Paul how the public can be lulled into thinking that a cause is good and get involved on that basis alone. This is why I am pointing to other options so that it may spark thought towards perhaps a better direction, and I do say perhaps. Our buddy seems more concerned with a minority that may or may not be abusing the system, but I am sure when the kitchen was set up, they were not, nor were the contributors. People by nature are good and want to help, but help can be achieved in many ways, not just throwing money at a problem and expect it to just go away. There will always be people in need, so when we decide to help, my words are only those of caution so that these projects can do as much as they can. Mr. Food Stamps seems to be so scope locked on a certain few, he ignores the entire discussion we are having which of course requires thought and reason to move forward. No, forget all that, what about food stamps, you know food stamps. Food stamps. Did anybody think about food stamps? Like I said above, another brilliant statement embodying reason and logic. So, let’s now talk about, yep you guess it, FOOD STAMPS!(LOL)
Paul Templeton wrote:
<quoted text>
Does it matter?
That is like assuming that because a man is broke, he blew all his money or because a man is unemployed, he got fired for incompetence.
The reasons are many. Some are understandable and some not so understandable.
Do we deny all because some may not be deserving?

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#29 Aug 7, 2011
Philanthropy work better wrote:
You can understand Paul how the public can be lulled into thinking that a cause is good and get involved on that basis alone. This is why I am pointing to other options so that it may spark thought towards perhaps a better direction, and I do say perhaps. Our buddy seems more concerned with a minority that may or may not be abusing the system, but I am sure when the kitchen was set up, they were not, nor were the contributors. People by nature are good and want to help, but help can be achieved in many ways, not just throwing money at a problem and expect it to just go away. There will always be people in need, so when we decide to help, my words are only those of caution so that these projects can do as much as they can. Mr. Food Stamps seems to be so scope locked on a certain few, he ignores the entire discussion we are having which of course requires thought and reason to move forward. No, forget all that, what about food stamps, you know food stamps. Food stamps. Did anybody think about food stamps? Like I said above, another brilliant statement embodying reason and logic. So, let’s now talk about, yep you guess it, FOOD STAMPS!(LOL)
<quoted text>
Well the food stamp system has come a long way, although not perfect. They now use a debit card type system instead of actual stamps and it has cut down on trading them for cash.
The complaint of frivolous spending though is a legitimate one as many people either buy unhealthy foods or utilize poor budgeting and run out before it is time to replenish.
As for the budgeting, perhaps a weekly allotment instead of an monthly one is the answer. That will insure the supply will last all month but it does nothing for the unhealthy buying habits.
Personally I don't know if the answer is education because most people know frozen pizza isn't healthy. It is however, convenient.
Perhaps it might be best to go back to the old commodity system of giving out staples directly instead of stamps.
Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#30 Aug 8, 2011
An idea might be to give users groceries at costs so that their allot age goes even farther. Healthy living is a life choice and for the most part has nothing to do with how people pay for food. Even the richest people eat according to their personal tastes, not their budget. When going back in time towards old systems, you must examine why we moved from them in the first place. People are so diverse in their needs it's next to impossible to come up with a single system that meets needs. The card that is now used can simply be taken to a store with a third party, have them get what they need, then have the user pay with the card. That person in turns pays the user a percentage in cash and you still have people buying and selling stamps, or abusing the system. There is not full-proof way of eliminating abuse, but reform efforts that restrict assistance to five years per person per lifetime are a great start. Remember that anything of value can be traded or bartered with and stamps are no different. Value is what somebody thinks it is or worth, not what it actually is. Clearly there are not easy solutions and abusers hide amongst the needy. Education may help, but most of these users lack it and you can’t teach old dog new tricks, just new ways of abusing; which they seem to have little trouble finding answers to that. I like the discussion and enjoy anybody that feels strongly about change for the better. These few that choose to gripe and complain and never offer anything of value to a discussion; other than the occasional insults will never be part of any solutions. This is why we should ignore them and focus past them. Good luck and keep thinking. Answers and solutions are but just a thought away. Hope you find both in our mental exercises.
Philanthropy work better

Hamilton, OH

#31 Aug 13, 2011
Let me give you an example Paul of what I am talking about. When I was in college at NKU, Neal Marison Foundation gave two classes grants and made a contest to see what students would do if they were in charge of giving the grants. Of the sixty or so students that competed, only two projects was funded, one of them being mine. I suggested that we refurbish two half-way house apartments at Charlie’s 3/4 House on Vine St. in Cincinnati. These apartments had to be fixed so that inmates that were returning to the streets had a place to stay while they readjusted to normal life on their own. I argued that these units would sustain themselves by providing housing long after we spent the money. That was in 2000 and they are still in operation today. As to how many people it actually helped is unknown, but if you consider a normal stay is 90 days, you can assume hundreds have benefited from these apartments being repaired. Of course I was happy that my project was chosen over the other students, but it was chosen because it embodied sustainment. Therefore, I have come to see that these are the projects that are worth funding and the effort of those who would contribute to them. Unlike these soup kitchens, they continuously rely on new money to keep them going, rather than leverage the initial dollars to keep them going. In short, we must look for ways to maximize dollars if we are to reach more than a select few; which is why I am saying use caution, not that soup kitchens are bad. They do help, but we must continue to strive to find better ways to help as many as we can. I hope this gives you an understanding of why I feel this way and that I am not downing anybody that chooses to help others; for that is always a good thing no matter who or how they are helping. Good luck and I enjoyed talking to someone that is interested in simply having a discussion rather than using these forums as some type of fighting platform to throw petty insults at people who are just having a conversation. Again, good luck Paul and it was my pleasure.

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