SPECIAL REPORT: The front lines shift...

SPECIAL REPORT: The front lines shift ... Military veterans fac...

There are 14 comments on the Farmington Daily Times story from Mar 31, 2008, titled SPECIAL REPORT: The front lines shift ... Military veterans fac.... In it, Farmington Daily Times reports that:

Anthony Torres was looking forward to life as a civilian. The 26-year-old Marine spent seven months atop a Humvee manning an anti-tank missile in wartorn Iraq, and he was anxious to be home.

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old grandma

Santa Fe, NM

#2 Mar 31, 2008
God bless you in every way, thank you so much for your service, I hope you find peace and the help that you need. I'm am a wife of a disable vet, and I still have family AND FRIENDS in the military. I again want to THANK YOU AND COMMEND YOU FOR YOU SERVICE TO AND FOR YOUR COUNTRY. And to all the other service men and woman out there THANK YOU and GOD BLESS YOU.
Amy

Tijeras, NM

#3 Mar 31, 2008
Only God can heal and help these veterans. Only God can stop these "wars." My son is a US Marine, so is my son in law. Luckily as natives, we have ceremonies to help them cope with reality and life as it is here on the outside. God bless the troops.
stfu

Albuquerque, NM

#4 Mar 31, 2008
it sucks, my father-in-law is still crazy from Nam.
sae

United States

#5 Mar 31, 2008
Glad to see this being addressed & acknolwedged for our new veterans. My son has served 3 tours in Iraq and is suffering from this stress syndrome. Our prayers go out to all these veterans.
Henry

Eagle River, AK

#6 Mar 31, 2008
My prayers to all of you men and women who are serving and the ones who are retired. I can only say that by talking to someone who will listen can help you in you time of need. We all need to be able to listen and be there for these vets. I for one cannot imagine what you have gone through, but I can only say that what I have seen my own father go through is not pretty. He suffered as a POW and came home. He never forgot those days and nights he spent in prison, but by talking about it, it eased his mind and little by little he coped with his situation and he stopped drinking and smoking long before he passed away. We as family need to stand by our vets and welcome them into our arms and not criticize them for what they are doing, they are not the ones making the choices they are just told to do what they need to do to survive. As natives we need not only open our arms to our own people, but to others out of our race, because when they are in the arms forces they are as one and not seperated, so we need to be as one with them.
carrie collard

Powderly, TX

#7 Mar 31, 2008
my dad is John Collard. He is an amazing man and an excellent example of what treatment can do to help guys just like him. I wish there had been help when he was younger. We need to support our VETs young and old. God bless you all...never give up!
Arnold

Fpo, AP

#8 Mar 31, 2008
As an ACTIVE DUTY serviceman, i can say that i appreciate the column on this subject. Although i do not have this disorder, friends of mine do. They have gone thru alot protecting our country. Instead of being subjected to harsh critizism, support from family, friends even strangers definitely helps to cope with this disorder. To be far away from home, from all that you know is difficult. Questioning yourself, "if what your doing is the right to do?" And you have to understand its out of your hands, that you must follow orders to save your own life and that of your fellow soldiers. To those who have not served in the ARMED FORCES or to those who don't appreciate what is done for this country, should ask themselves this question, "What have I done for my country??"
just a thought

AOL

#9 Apr 1, 2008
Arnold wrote:
As an ACTIVE DUTY serviceman, i can say that i appreciate the column on this subject. Although i do not have this disorder, friends of mine do. They have gone thru alot protecting our country. Instead of being subjected to harsh critizism, support from family, friends even strangers definitely helps to cope with this disorder. To be far away from home, from all that you know is difficult. Questioning yourself, "if what your doing is the right to do?" And you have to understand its out of your hands, that you must follow orders to save your own life and that of your fellow soldiers. To those who have not served in the ARMED FORCES or to those who don't appreciate what is done for this country, should ask themselves this question, "What have I done for my country??"
I told my daughter I don't like war, but I will to my dying breath support all our soldiers,female,male and yes even the four legged ones.God bless to all the active and inactive soldiers and know that you are in so many of our prayers.
Former Scorp 91-94

Pleidelsheim, Germany

#10 Feb 23, 2009
It's a scary thing to come back from Iraq and hear something or see something that will set you off. For me it passed with time. I wish you god speed and hopefully your syndrome passes quickly for you so you can get back to normal everyday life!
Respect Rights For All

Farmington, NM

#11 May 15, 2009
God Bless Our Troups! Thank you for protecting us and we do appreciate you and love you for what you have sacraficed for us. I pray for all those in and out of duty that they will find peace with in. Thank you for all that you do and have done for us, we Americans do support you and appreciate what you have done for all of us!
Kathy Haddock

AOL

#12 Jun 28, 2009
Support our troops!! Whether in combat overseas or back home dealing with the aftermath we should support our troops!
Grateful to All Veterans

Aiken, SC

#13 Jul 16, 2009
To Mr. Torres and all veterans of past wars, those serving now and in the future, I want to thank you for your selflessness in serving for this Country's freedom. It's individuals as yourself, that allow us to have the freedom to express ourselves with the voice we've been blessed with. I know that all sounds so cliche' but truly, I am thankful to you for serving for us. My maternal grandfather, my father, my husband, and my youngest daughter all served in the Military as well. I cannot express my gratitude enough. Too many of you have gone unnoticed.

“getting closer to home...”

Since: Aug 08

middle of nowhere NM

#14 Jul 16, 2009
Shadows, never come out to the light. i know, i live in a dark hole, and content.thank you for your blessings.my unit never returned, except one.
Bless one and all, through out history.
David

Huntsville, AL

#15 Dec 24, 2009
He needs to look in to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) treatment. Its been recorded that people with PTSD can spend years with counselors and see little change in there life. Only one EMDR session had a bigger result then years of counseling.

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