'Recovery' leaving jobless stranded

'Recovery' leaving jobless stranded

There are 15 comments on the Sentinel & Enterprise story from Aug 16, 2013, titled 'Recovery' leaving jobless stranded. In it, Sentinel & Enterprise reports that:

Welcome to the new economy, where a rising tide no longer lifts all boats. Although the real estate and stock markets continue to ride a strong wave of recovery since the Great Recession, the job market remains a packed rowboat marooned on a sandbar at ebb tide.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Sentinel & Enterprise.

nwo

Westminster, MA

#1 Aug 18, 2013
and people say "get a job", no shiznit sherlock, i think our country is trying to do A LOT of that. yep.
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#2 Aug 18, 2013
There are lots of jobs but people don't want to work in a factory. They have the "I want it all now" attitude.
Really

Leominster, MA

#3 Aug 18, 2013
Factory jobs are surprisingly specialized these days. You must be confusing them with fast food jobs.
When is the last time you actually looked for, applied for, waited for, and interviewed for a job? It's a lot different now.
heaven forbid

Gardner, MA

#4 Aug 18, 2013
We allow anything to be done to reign in Corporations influence on labor policy and demand a living wage for working 50-60 hours a week!

It's the bottom, where we can't allow more than minimum wage, and the top, where they make obscene amounts of money.

Guess what, if there is no middle jobs, there is no need for middle housing or anything else that goes along with a middle America, you know, where more than 90% actually are!!!!

And sh*t on anyone who isn't lucky enough to have a connection to a rare musical chairs middle position!

Just keep insisting that Millionaires don't need to pay their fare share, keep insisting that the bottom is not your worry and they must just be lazy. Keep insisting that the general public does not require basic healthcare and that they should just suck it up if one illness dooms them to bankruptcy and homelesness.

You're getting the GOP utopia you're allowing your Politicians to create.
Confused

Leominster, MA

#5 Aug 18, 2013
It's a strange world Obama has made for us to live in. For instance he has pushed Obamacare on all American people except for Senators, Congressmen etc.. because it's not good enough for them?
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#6 Aug 18, 2013
Really wrote:
Factory jobs are surprisingly specialized these days. You must be confusing them with fast food jobs.
When is the last time you actually looked for, applied for, waited for, and interviewed for a job? It's a lot different now.
No. Avery Dennison hiring, entry level. They are not specialized jobs. Only the technician's job that program the computer operated machines are specialized.
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#7 Aug 18, 2013
Confused wrote:
It's a strange world Obama has made for us to live in. For instance he has pushed Obamacare on all American people except for Senators, Congressmen etc.. because it's not good enough for them?
The only problem is that no one has any ideas that could replace Obamacare. Even Obama stated send me your ideas and and has gotten a "zero" response.
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#8 Aug 18, 2013
heaven forbid wrote:
We allow anything to be done to reign in Corporations influence on labor policy and demand a living wage for working 50-60 hours a week!
It's the bottom, where we can't allow more than minimum wage, and the top, where they make obscene amounts of money.
Guess what, if there is no middle jobs, there is no need for middle housing or anything else that goes along with a middle America, you know, where more than 90% actually are!!!!
And sh*t on anyone who isn't lucky enough to have a connection to a rare musical chairs middle position!
Just keep insisting that Millionaires don't need to pay their fare share, keep insisting that the bottom is not your worry and they must just be lazy. Keep insisting that the general public does not require basic healthcare and that they should just suck it up if one illness dooms them to bankruptcy and homelesness.
You're getting the GOP utopia you're allowing your Politicians to create.
You have to start at the bottom and work your way up. Again, "I want it all now" attitude.

I was employed for 10 years at minimum wage. I sacrificed and survived. I did not look at the millionaires lifestyles, I concentrated on my career goals. I worked nights and went to school during the day. I worked a second job on the weekends. Now at $100K a year it was worth the effort and I still don't care about millionaires.

Middle class jobs is not something that is just handed to you. People are too lazy now. "I want it all now". Just taking 2-4 colleges courses a year over 10 years will earn you a degree. People don't look at the long term anymore. They want it all now.

Stop making excuses and blaming millionaires.

People don't want to spend the time to work their way up to a better position. They don't want to spend the time for training and education. They want it now.
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#9 Aug 18, 2013
OR burn down you building and make 4.1 million It works for some people .. right Clark??
heaven forbid

Woburn, MA

#10 Aug 19, 2013
Confused wrote:
It's a strange world Obama has made for us to live in. For instance he has pushed Obamacare on all American people except for Senators, Congressmen etc.. because it's not good enough for them?
You really are confused, you see, that is a myth and not really true, try getting the reality and come back, this is just a talking point fead to you!

If you've been following the health care debate lately, you've probably heard quite a bit of talk about Congress being "exempt" from the Affordable Care Act. It's a talking point the right has pushed quite aggressively, but is it true?

Republicans certainly want us to think so. Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) complained about an "outrageous exemption for Congress." The far-right editorial page of the Wall Street Journal and Heritage Foundation president Jim DeMint touted a similar line last week. Over the weekend, Republican media figures, including Bill Kristol and Ana Navaro, repeated the talking point on the Sunday shows, and no one thought to correct them. This morning, in an unusually hysterical piece, a Washington Times columnist suggested the policy might constitute "treason." (No, seriously, that's what it said.)

The policy certainly sounds awful, doesn't it? If "Obamacare" is so great, why are members of Congress eager to exempt themselves from the new federal system? No wonder Fox is so worked up over this.

The problem, as you might have guessed, is that the argument is so wildly misleading, it bears no meaningful connection to reality.

The trouble started in 2009 with a cheap stunt orchestrated by Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa). While lawmakers already get insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan, just like other federal employees, the Iowa Republican pushed a proposal to force members of Congress out of the federal system and into exchanges.

The point wasn't to shape policy, but to create a talking point for Republicans. Grassley desperately wanted to say, "Those darn Democrats think the exchanges are good enough for millions of Americans, but not good enough for themselves," and he assumed Dems would balk at his "plan" because they'd be unwilling to give up the generous Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan.

But Democrats called Grassley's bluff, embraced his idea, and added it to the Affordable Care Act.

And that's where the story gets a little tricky -- Grassley's partisan-stunt-gone-wrong sent members and their aides to get coverage through exchange marketplaces, but never created a mechanism to make that happen.

The federal government, like most large employers, not only provides the opportunity for its workers to get insurance. It also pays a large portion of the premium. Now that lawmakers and their advisers were going into the exchanges, what would happen to that contribution? Would they just lose the money?

The answer, the administration decided last week, is no. Lawmakers and their staffs could keep their employer contributions, and apply that money towards the cost of whatever insurance they buy in the exchanges.

The policy has nothing to do with "exempting" Congress from the health care law, and everything to do with creating a mechanism through which lawmakers will kick themselves off their own insurance plan and into exchanges without a major premium hike.

For Republicans and their allies to whine incessantly about this is ridiculous, even by contemporary conservative standards. We are, after all, talking about an idea pushed by a Republican senator and quietly celebrated away from the cameras by Republican offices.

Jon Chait added that the manufactured outrage over an "exemption" for Congress represents "the toxic combination of ignorance and bad faith that has characterized the right's approach to Obamacare."
heaven forbid

Woburn, MA

#11 Aug 19, 2013
So Grassley's amendment created a situation for government workers that Republicans claimed, falsely, the law would create for everybody else: forcing them off their employer insurance and on to the exchanges. Grassley's amendment didn't even attempt to design a coherent way of changing health-care worker benefits, because, again, it wasn't an attempt to reform health care for Congress and its staff -- it was an attempt to furnish a talking point for Rush Limbaugh and Fox News. It yanked away the subsidized health insurance Congress and its staff get, essentially imposing a massive pay cut on those workers.<.blockquote>

It was up to the Obama administration to figure out a resolution to this, and last week, to the relief of lawmakers and their staffers, it did -- offering the patch to a problem a Republican senator inadvertently imposed on lawmakers.

Bottom line: has Congress exempted itself from Obamacare? No. Members of the House and Senate, as well as their aides, will be kicked out of the federal system -- all because Grassley played a stupid game -- and will get coverage through exchanges.

The exchanges were, of course, designed for Americans who can't get coverage through their employer, but this pool of consumers will have a very notable exception: Congress.

Anyone who tells you there's a congressional "exemption" from the law either doesn't know what they're talking about, or assumes you're easily fooled into believing nonsense.

So, it's a GOP amendment you're crying about numbnuts!!!
heaven forbid

Woburn, MA

#12 Aug 19, 2013
Droopyballs wrote:
<quoted text>
You have to start at the bottom and work your way up. Again, "I want it all now" attitude.
I was employed for 10 years at minimum wage. I sacrificed and survived. I did not look at the millionaires lifestyles, I concentrated on my career goals. I worked nights and went to school during the day. I worked a second job on the weekends. Now at $100K a year it was worth the effort and I still don't care about millionaires.
Middle class jobs is not something that is just handed to you. People are too lazy now. "I want it all now". Just taking 2-4 colleges courses a year over 10 years will earn you a degree. People don't look at the long term anymore. They want it all now.
Stop making excuses and blaming millionaires.
People don't want to spend the time to work their way up to a better position. They don't want to spend the time for training and education. They want it now.
People right out of college with degrees are working for minimum wage, try not to forget, it's not just cause you worked hard that you have succeeded, everyone else works JUST AS HARD AS YOU, don't forget your musical chairs LUCK there!!!
Confused

Leominster, MA

#13 Aug 19, 2013
heaven forbid wrote:
<quoted text>
You really are confused, you see, that is a myth and not really true, try getting the reality and come back, this is just a talking point fead to you!
If you've been following the health care debate lately, you've probably heard quite a bit of talk about Congress being "exempt" from the Affordable Care Act. It's a talking point the right has pushed quite aggressively, but is it true?
Republicans certainly want us to think so. Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) complained about an "outrageous exemption for Congress." The far-right editorial page of the Wall Street Journal and Heritage Foundation president Jim DeMint touted a similar line last week. Over the weekend, Republican media figures, including Bill Kristol and Ana Navaro, repeated the talking point on the Sunday shows, and no one thought to correct them. This morning, in an unusually hysterical piece, a Washington Times columnist suggested the policy might constitute "treason." (No, seriously, that's what it said.)
The policy certainly sounds awful, doesn't it? If "Obamacare" is so great, why are members of Congress eager to exempt themselves from the new federal system? No wonder Fox is so worked up over this.
The problem, as you might have guessed, is that the argument is so wildly misleading, it bears no meaningful connection to reality.
The trouble started in 2009 with a cheap stunt orchestrated by Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa). While lawmakers already get insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan, just like other federal employees, the Iowa Republican pushed a proposal to force members of Congress out of the federal system and into exchanges.
The point wasn't to shape policy, but to create a talking point for Republicans. Grassley desperately wanted to say, "Those darn Democrats think the exchanges are good enough for millions of Americans, but not good enough for themselves," and he assumed Dems would balk at his "plan" because they'd be unwilling to give up the generous Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan.
But Democrats called Grassley's bluff, embraced his idea, and added it to the Affordable Care Act.
And that's where the story gets a little tricky -- Grassley's partisan-stunt-gone-wrong sent members and their aides to get coverage through exchange marketplaces, but never created a mechanism to make that happen.
The federal government, like most large employers, not only provides the opportunity for its workers to get insurance. It also pays a large portion of the premium. Now that lawmakers and their advisers were going into the exchanges, what would happen to that contribution? Would they just lose the money?
The answer, the administration decided last week, is no. Lawmakers and their staffs could keep their employer contributions, and apply that money towards the cost of whatever insurance they buy in the exchanges.
The policy has nothing to do with "exempting" Congress from the health care law, and everything to do with creating a mechanism through which lawmakers will kick themselves off their own insurance plan and into exchanges without a major premium hike.
For Republicans and their allies to whine incessantly about this is ridiculous, even by contemporary conservative standards. We are, after all, talking about an idea pushed by a Republican senator and quietly celebrated away from the cameras by Republican offices.
Jon Chait added that the manufactured outrage over an "exemption" for Congress represents "the toxic combination of ignorance and bad faith that has characterized the right's approach to Obamacare."
So to make a short story long you need to get a life.
heaven forbid

Woburn, MA

#14 Aug 19, 2013
heaven forbid wrote:
<quoted text>
People right out of college with degrees are working for minimum wage, try not to forget, it's not just cause you worked hard that you have succeeded, everyone else works JUST AS HARD AS YOU, don't forget your musical chairs LUCK there!!!
The reverse is the un-lucky, 50 year olds who have worked as hard and as long as you, but just didn'y have the same luck, are only fidning minimum wage jobs! It has nothing to do with hard work, education and has everything to do with Corporations hollowing out the middle leaving less and less musical chair jobs, just like I said the first post!!!

Your problem is you think only you work hard, that's just nonsense!
heaven forbid

Woburn, MA

#15 Aug 19, 2013
Confused wrote:
<quoted text>So to make a short story long you need to get a life.
How about this for a short little story then, STFU if all you can do is recite a myth talking point absent any real facts or truth, how's that?! My life is just fine, apparently a life of ignorance sounds good to you well I don't think stupid and ignorant is a way to go through life!

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