Your View: Some thoughts for those who live in Fairhaven

There are 7 comments on the Dec 15, 2011, SouthCoastToday.com story titled Your View: Some thoughts for those who live in Fairhaven. In it, SouthCoastToday.com reports that:

I worry for my friends in Fairhaven. Last week I had a visit from some nice gentlemen in fear.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at SouthCoastToday.com.

Bill Carson

Mattapoisett, MA

#1 Dec 17, 2011
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Your View: Falmouth turbines will cost more in the long run
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var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By BARRY FUNFAR
Barry Funfar lives in Falmouth.
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM

The back of my home is 1,662 feet from Falmouth's first industrial wind turbine, which started operation in March 2010.

I am certain that many, if not most people, have not a clue as to how "affected" with anxiety, stress, palpitations, panic attacks, depression, even suicidal tendencies some of us experience. Many others have only headaches, high blood pressure, irritability, anger, migraines, etc. It becomes worse as exposure time lengthens. I need to avoid the turbine, to stay indoors at my property, and to take frequent trips away from my home.

I could hear the Wind I turbine under nearly all wind speeds and directions, and I know that it makes varying noises depending upon a huge number of factors.

To subject myself to what is torturous for me is no longer going to happen. I have learned all I need to know about living too close to an industrial wind turbine. If I were the only person affected I would simply move, as all of my medical providers have suggested, but I am far from being alone, so I chose to fight. I intend to continue to live where I have for the past 32 years. But that can only be without the turbine.

I really do not understand why so many people find the problems with wind turbines so complex. What difference does it make just why some people living to closely are so adversely affected? Dr. Malcolm Swinbanks explains the difference in human perception of sound quite clearly. Dr. Alex Salt's research shows that "what you do not hear can hurt you" (infrasound). Dr. Michael Nissinbalm's recent epidemiological study in Vinalhaven, Maine, clearly shows the clustering of medical ailments of populations living close to industrial wind turbines. Many studies have determined that no one should be subject to living within 1.24 miles (6,547 feet) of an IWT. Some countries have adopted that standard. Most importantly to me, is that I know first hand what living 1,662 feet from Falmouth's Wind I has done to me.

The town of Fairhaven has the unique opportunity to see exactly what has happened in the town of Falmouth with its failed wind project. The two 1.65 megawatt machines are now inoperative after Town Meeting (which had voted them to be built several years ago) was about to vote them out. In Falmouth, health is more important than money. The select board, in a great effort to save face, decided they would shut them down instead of allowing Town Meeting to do it. There will be another Town Meeting vote in the spring unless the selectmen permanently close the turbines down before that.

Eleven million dollars is the expected price tag to remove them. Is it worth the risk to Fairhaven to lose this amount of taxpayer's money?

If the town goes ahead with the project, how can the outcome be expected to differ from that in Falmouth? Wind I in Falmouth is 1,320 feet from the closest resident. Fairhaven would have citizens within 900 feet. Medical and nuisance lawsuits would quickly eliminate any generation gains.

Just who are the geniuses who proposed this project in your town?
Bill Carson

Mattapoisett, MA

#2 Dec 17, 2011
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...

Your View: Falmouth turbines will cost more in the long run

var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By BARRY FUNFAR
Barry Funfar lives in Falmouth.
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM

The back of my home is 1,662 feet from Falmouth's first industrial wind turbine, which started operation in March 2010.

I am certain that many, if not most people, have not a clue as to how "affected" with anxiety, stress, palpitations, panic attacks, depression, even suicidal tendencies some of us experience. Many others have only headaches, high blood pressure, irritability, anger, migraines, etc. It becomes worse as exposure time lengthens. I need to avoid the turbine, to stay indoors at my property, and to take frequent trips away from my home.

I could hear the Wind I turbine under nearly all wind speeds and directions, and I know that it makes varying noises depending upon a huge number of factors.

To subject myself to what is torturous for me is no longer going to happen. I have learned all I need to know about living too close to an industrial wind turbine. If I were the only person affected I would simply move, as all of my medical providers have suggested, but I am far from being alone, so I chose to fight. I intend to continue to live where I have for the past 32 years. But that can only be without the turbine.

I really do not understand why so many people find the problems with wind turbines so complex. What difference does it make just why some people living to closely are so adversely affected? Dr. Malcolm Swinbanks explains the difference in human perception of sound quite clearly. Dr. Alex Salt's research shows that "what you do not hear can hurt you" (infrasound). Dr. Michael Nissinbalm's recent epidemiological study in Vinalhaven, Maine, clearly shows the clustering of medical ailments of populations living close to industrial wind turbines. Many studies have determined that no one should be subject to living within 1.24 miles (6,547 feet) of an IWT. Some countries have adopted that standard. Most importantly to me, is that I know first hand what living 1,662 feet from Falmouth's Wind I has done to me.

The town of Fairhaven has the unique opportunity to see exactly what has happened in the town of Falmouth with its failed wind project. The two 1.65 megawatt machines are now inoperative after Town Meeting (which had voted them to be built several years ago) was about to vote them out. In Falmouth, health is more important than money. The select board, in a great effort to save face, decided they would shut them down instead of allowing Town Meeting to do it. There will be another Town Meeting vote in the spring unless the selectmen permanently close the turbines down before that.

Eleven million dollars is the expected price tag to remove them. Is it worth the risk to Fairhaven to lose this amount of taxpayer's money?

If the town goes ahead with the project, how can the outcome be expected to differ from that in Falmouth? Wind I in Falmouth is 1,320 feet from the closest resident. Fairhaven would have citizens within 900 feet. Medical and nuisance lawsuits would quickly eliminate any generation gains.

Just who are the geniuses who proposed this project in your town?
Bill Carson

Mattapoisett, MA

#3 Dec 17, 2011
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...
Your View: Some thoughts for those who live in Fairhaven
var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By SUE HOBART
Sue Hobart lives in Falmouth
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM
I worry for my friends in Fairhaven. Last week I had a visit from some nice gentlemen in fear. The wind turbines seem to be coming, in spite of all that continues to be learned about these things. The green sales pitches and grant money are once again overruling common sense. Oh politics, what a shaky basis on which to live.
When this project began, health impacts were not as well known. The residential turbines studied then were easily one-third the size of what is being proposed in Fairhaven and what is already up in Falmouth. Size matters. The bigger they are, the more energy they collect and spin off into your neighborhood.
Hearing about the new school so close to this project makes my skin crawl. I can bet you that at least 25 percent of those children will have difficulty learning. The school will fail to educate well and make some children sick simply because of the environmental stressors created by the turbines. Google "infrasound" for the effects.
You will hear talk of sound levels and ambient noise. This is not about noise, but air pressure. Turbines effect the human vestibular and inner ear system. How the environment is perceived is not entirely through the senses but also through the skin, ears and body. The unnatural and widely variable vibrations produced when the wind changes are magnified many times when thrown off by these big turbines.
The body perceives this as a danger and reacts with a fight or flight response, among others. Being in that state, even on a minor level, creates ongoing and cumulative stress to the system that degrades concentration, focus, spacial perception, and many other elements of basic physical well being.
No sales pitches, pre-construction models, studies or assurances can protect you: too many variables. This happened to me, and my life here in Falmouth is over as I once knew it. I will not be holding my son's wedding in my beautiful yard, bringing grandchildren here to visit (if so blessed), be enjoying the stars from my back deck, lounging in my hot tub or working in my garden. I cannot even sleep upstairs in my bedroom.
I am in the basement hiding from the Webb Turbine. My home-based business is now closed. Cannot work here, sleep here, relax here or count on having a nice day in my home. It's all about the turbine and it respects no set schedule.
What about the element of cost effectiveness and emissions benefits? Truth? Wind can't be stored. It has to be used immediately. We want constant electricity available so back up plant needs to be ready and able to go at any minute. No coal, hydro or nuclear facilities have ever been replaced by wind turbines. Not anywhere.
Global warming? Fully half the world-class physicists in the world would argue the case as not being a man-made consequence of actions but as being a natural process. Yet there is a lot of political rhetoric on the subject. What do ya think, Al Gore or Einstein?
NIMBY

Mattapoisett, MA

#4 Dec 17, 2011
http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...

Your View: NIMBYs have served Fairhaven well in the past

var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By HENRY FERREIRA
Henry Ferreira lives in Fairhaven.
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM

Fairhaven town officials have again mindlessly jumped on the next new thing. Our executive secretary and his board are always ready and willing to offer up the people they represent as guinea pigs. In years past it was a regional dump, then regional sludge plants, one of which burned demolition debris. Now it's two massive turbines beside a pristine marsh next to homes and a school.

As before, they proclaim they've met all of the legal requirements and there will be no negative impacts. Led by Jeff Osuch, they've come close to destroying what's left of this town's character and sense of place. As before, they have ignored the neighbors, they've ignored the health impacts and have worked behind closed doors. They know opposition will be determined and multiplied exponentially by proximity. As always, they pit one section of this small town against another.

Brian Bowcock, the selectman pushing this project, brands the opposition NIMBYs. I'm a NIMBY. I've been one for a long time. We and other NIMBYs have fought off projects, including Bio Safe, Netco and Azurix. We are a safer, healthier, better town because of the NIMBYs.

Now it's two Chinese-made industrial turbines. Bowcock says everything was done in full light. As with all the other projects, the facts appear to contradict him. No abutters notified, project kept under wraps until after the Wood/Rogers School vote, the clearing done over Veterans Day weekend and erection of the turbines due to begin during Christmas.

Bowcock says there are no negative impacts, health or otherwise. He says one of the most vocal critics is not even one of the non-notified abutters. Bowcock writes in a letter to the Fairhaven Neighborhood News, 12/8, "You live more than a mile away," "The turbines pose absolutely no health hazard to you and your wife."

One can assume from his statement, he feels setbacks do make sense and he inadvertently admits there are health hazards for those within a mile. He writes in this letter, he was honoring our nation's veterans while the developer ripped out the trees along the bike path to make way for Fairhaven's Chinese turbines.

He's quite a patriot, however one might think buying an American-made turbine built by veterans would be a good way to honor them. But those pesky setback rules are problematic. The American made turbines come with setback regulations from the manufacture, the Chinese turbines don't. As always, with this selectman, when expediency trumps honor. The setback distances protect the company against lawsuits. Who will protect the town if these Chinese turbines are erected?

If there is any hope it's at the health board. They have all the evidence they need to understand these 400-foot turbines do pose a risk. The turbines are too close to homes and to Wood School.

The health board has the responsibility and power to stop them. Tom Crotty, the town's longtime legal defender of these type projects, played the lawsuit card in The Standard-Times on Dec. 8, "Turbine foes rally support": "The Board of Health has the authority to make you stop doing something if they determine it is a public nuisance, but you have the right to sue them if they're wrong," I'm sure the health board has received this message.

A lawsuit is unlikely; it would poison the well for the developer. Regardless the health board members need to ask themselves would they rather fight the developer or the people they've pledged to protect.
voter

New Bedford, MA

#5 Dec 19, 2011
NIMBY wrote:
http://www.southcoasttoday.com /apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20 111216/OPINION/112160307

Your View: NIMBYs have served Fairhaven well in the past

var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By HENRY FERREIRA
Henry Ferreira lives in Fairhaven.
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM

Fairhaven town officials have again mindlessly jumped on the next new thing. Our executive secretary and his board are always ready and willing to offer up the people they represent as guinea pigs. In years past it was a regional dump, then regional sludge plants, one of which burned demolition debris. Now it's two massive turbines beside a pristine marsh next to homes and a school.

As before, they proclaim they've met all of the legal requirements and there will be no negative impacts. Led by Jeff Osuch, they've come close to destroying what's left of this town's character and sense of place. As before, they have ignored the neighbors, they've ignored the health impacts and have worked behind closed doors. They know opposition will be determined and multiplied exponentially by proximity. As always, they pit one section of this small town against another.

Brian Bowcock, the selectman pushing this project, brands the opposition NIMBYs. I'm a NIMBY. I've been one for a long time. We and other NIMBYs have fought off projects, including Bio Safe, Netco and Azurix. We are a safer, healthier, better town because of the NIMBYs.

Now it's two Chinese-made industrial turbines. Bowcock says everything was done in full light. As with all the other projects, the facts appear to contradict him. No abutters notified, project kept under wraps until after the Wood/Rogers School vote, the clearing done over Veterans Day weekend and erection of the turbines due to begin during Christmas.

Bowcock says there are no negative impacts, health or otherwise. He says one of the most vocal critics is not even one of the non-notified abutters. Bowcock writes in a letter to the Fairhaven Neighborhood News, 12/8, "You live more than a mile away," "The turbines pose absolutely no health hazard to you and your wife."

One can assume from his statement, he feels setbacks do make sense and he inadvertently admits there are health hazards for those within a mile. He writes in this letter, he was honoring our nation's veterans while the developer ripped out the trees along the bike path to make way for Fairhaven's Chinese turbines.

He's quite a patriot, however one might think buying an American-made turbine built by veterans would be a good way to honor them. But those pesky setback rules are problematic. The American made turbines come with setback regulations from the manufacture, the Chinese turbines don't. As always, with this selectman, when expediency trumps honor. The setback distances protect the company against lawsuits. Who will protect the town if these Chinese turbines are erected?

If there is any hope it's at the health board. They have all the evidence they need to understand these 400-foot turbines do pose a risk. The turbines are too close to homes and to Wood School.

The health board has the responsibility and power to stop them. Tom Crotty, the town's longtime legal defender of these type projects, played the lawsuit card in The Standard-Times on Dec. 8, "Turbine foes rally support": "The Board of Health has the authority to make you stop doing something if they determine it is a public nuisance, but you have the right to sue them if they're wrong," I'm sure the health board has received this message.

A lawsuit is unlikely; it would poison the well for the developer. Regardless the health board members need to ask themselves would they rather fight the developer or the people they've pledged to protect.
I agree. Jeff Osuch is destroying this town.
voter

New Bedford, MA

#6 Dec 19, 2011
Bill Carson wrote:
http://www.southcoasttoday.com /apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20 111216/OPINION/112160304
Your View: Falmouth turbines will cost more in the long run
Text Size: A | A | A
Print this Article Email this Article ShareThis

var isoPubDate ='December 16, 2011'By BARRY FUNFAR
Barry Funfar lives in Falmouth.
December 16, 2011 12:00 AM

The back of my home is 1,662 feet from Falmouth's first industrial wind turbine, which started operation in March 2010.

I am certain that many, if not most people, have not a clue as to how "affected" with anxiety, stress, palpitations, panic attacks, depression, even suicidal tendencies some of us experience. Many others have only headaches, high blood pressure, irritability, anger, migraines, etc. It becomes worse as exposure time lengthens. I need to avoid the turbine, to stay indoors at my property, and to take frequent trips away from my home.

I could hear the Wind I turbine under nearly all wind speeds and directions, and I know that it makes varying noises depending upon a huge number of factors.

To subject myself to what is torturous for me is no longer going to happen. I have learned all I need to know about living too close to an industrial wind turbine. If I were the only person affected I would simply move, as all of my medical providers have suggested, but I am far from being alone, so I chose to fight. I intend to continue to live where I have for the past 32 years. But that can only be without the turbine.

I really do not understand why so many people find the problems with wind turbines so complex. What difference does it make just why some people living to closely are so adversely affected? Dr. Malcolm Swinbanks explains the difference in human perception of sound quite clearly. Dr. Alex Salt's research shows that "what you do not hear can hurt you" (infrasound). Dr. Michael Nissinbalm's recent epidemiological study in Vinalhaven, Maine, clearly shows the clustering of medical ailments of populations living close to industrial wind turbines. Many studies have determined that no one should be subject to living within 1.24 miles (6,547 feet) of an IWT. Some countries have adopted that standard. Most importantly to me, is that I know first hand what living 1,662 feet from Falmouth's Wind I has done to me.

The town of Fairhaven has the unique opportunity to see exactly what has happened in the town of Falmouth with its failed wind project. The two 1.65 megawatt machines are now inoperative after Town Meeting (which had voted them to be built several years ago) was about to vote them out. In Falmouth, health is more important than money. The select board, in a great effort to save face, decided they would shut them down instead of allowing Town Meeting to do it. There will be another Town Meeting vote in the spring unless the selectmen permanently close the turbines down before that.

Eleven million dollars is the expected price tag to remove them. Is it worth the risk to Fairhaven to lose this amount of taxpayer's money?

If the town goes ahead with the project, how can the outcome be expected to differ from that in Falmouth? Wind I in Falmouth is 1,320 feet from the closest resident. Fairhaven would have citizens within 900 feet. Medical and nuisance lawsuits would quickly eliminate any generation gains.

Just who are the geniuses who proposed this project in your town?
The geniuses are our Board of Selectmen led by that Destroyer of Fairhaven, Jeff Osuch.
Sean

Leicester, MA

#7 Dec 20, 2011
Ah...just move to New Bedford lol

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