Fairhaven considers options for new t...

Fairhaven considers options for new town counsel

There are 2 comments on the SouthCoastToday.com story from Jul 25, 2013, titled Fairhaven considers options for new town counsel. In it, SouthCoastToday.com reports that:

Selectmen will advertise for a new town attorney in August and, in the interim, are looking into hiring a special attorney to help with potential litigation involving Fairhaven's two wind turbines.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at SouthCoastToday.com.

Jack Kelly

Jamestown, RI

#1 Jul 26, 2013
Wind turbines ARE a human health hazard: the smoking gun
How much more dirt needs to come out before the wind industry gets the thorough investigation it has long deserved?
The reason I ask is that it has now become clear that the industry has known for at least 25 years about the potentially damaging impact on human health of the impulsive infrasound (inaudible intermittent noise) produced by wind turbines. Yet instead of dealing with the problem it has, on the most generous interpretation, swept the issue under the carpet - or worse, been involved in a concerted cover-up operation
.
A research paper prepared in November 1987 for the US Department of Energy demonstrated that the "annoyance" caused by wind turbine noise to nearby residents is "real not imaginary." It further showed that, far from becoming inured to the disturbance people become increasingly sensitive to it over time.
This contradicts claims frequently made by wind industry spokesmen that there is no evidence for so-called Wind Turbine Syndrome (the various health issues ranging from insomnia and anxiety to palpitations and nausea reported by residents living within a mile or more of wind turbines). Until recently, RenewableUK - the British wind industry's trade body - claimed on its website: "In over 25 years and with more than 68,000 machines installed around the world, no member of the public has ever been harmed by the normal operation of wind farms."
In a section called Top Myths About Wind Energy' section it claimed that accusations that wind farms emit 'infrasound and cause associated health problems' are 'unscientific'.
Other pro-wind campaigners, such as Australian public health professor Simon Chapman, have gone still further by insisting that the symptoms reported by Wind Turbine Syndrome victims around the world are imaginary and often politically motivated.
But the 1987 report, based on earlier research by NASA and several universities, tells a different story. A team led by physicist ND Kelley from the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado tested under controlled conditions the impact of low-frequency noise generated by turbine blades.
It found that the disturbance is often worse when indoors than when outside (a sensation which will be familiar to anyone who has heard a helicopter hovering above their house).
In subsequent lab tests involving seven volunteers, it found that "people do indeed react to a low-frequency noise environment". As a result of its findings, the report recommended that in future wind turbines should be subject to a maximum noise threshold to prevent nearby residents experiencing "low-frequency annoyance situations."
However these recommendations - widely publicised at the Windpower 87 Conference & Exposition in San Francisco - fell on (wilfully, it seems more than plausible) deaf ears.
It found that the disturbance is often worse when indoors than when outside (a sensation which will be familiar to anyone who has heard a helicopter hovering above their house).
In subsequent lab tests involving seven volunteers, it found that "people do indeed react to a low-frequency noise environment". As a result of its findings, the report recommended that in future wind turbines should be subject to a maximum noise threshold to prevent nearby residents experiencing "low-frequency annoyance situations."
Rather than respond to the issues raised, the industry devised a code of practice apparently contrived to ignore those very acoustic levels of most concern. ETSU-R-97 - the UK industry standard, which became the model for wind developers around the world - places modest limits on sound within the normal human hearing range, but specifically excludes the lower frequency "infrasonic" noise known to cause problems.
Jack Kelly

Jamestown, RI

#2 Jul 26, 2013

Wind turbines ARE a human health hazard: the smoking gun


How much more dirt needs to come out before the wind industry gets the thorough investigation it has long deserved?



The reason I ask is that it has now become clear that the industry has known for at least 25 years about the potentially damaging impact on human health of the impulsive infrasound (inaudible intermittent noise) produced by wind turbines. Yet instead of dealing with the problem it has, on the most generous interpretation, swept the issue under the carpet - or worse, been involved in a concerted cover-up operation

.

A research paper prepared in November 1987 for the US Department of Energy demonstrated that the "annoyance" caused by wind turbine noise to nearby residents is "real not imaginary." It further showed that, far from becoming inured to the disturbance people become increasingly sensitive to it over time.



This contradicts claims frequently made by wind industry spokesmen that there is no evidence for so-called Wind Turbine Syndrome (the various health issues ranging from insomnia and anxiety to palpitations and nausea reported by residents living within a mile or more of wind turbines). Until recently, RenewableUK - the British wind industry's trade body - claimed on its website: "In over 25 years and with more than 68,000 machines installed around the world, no member of the public has ever been harmed by the normal operation of wind farms."



In a section called Top Myths About Wind Energy' section it claimed that accusations that wind farms emit 'infrasound and cause associated health problems' are 'unscientific'.



Other pro-wind campaigners, such as Australian public health professor Simon Chapman, have gone still further by insisting that the symptoms reported by Wind Turbine Syndrome victims around the world are imaginary and often politically motivated.



But the 1987 report, based on earlier research by NASA and several universities, tells a different story. A team led by physicist ND Kelley from the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado tested under controlled conditions the impact of low-frequency noise generated by turbine blades.

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