Letters to the Editor - Editorials

Letters to the Editor - Editorials

There are 136 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Jan 4, 2009, titled Letters to the Editor - Editorials. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

Do police care about fireworks law? This New Year's Eve was the worst ever in Kailua.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

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Since: Mar 08

Aiea, HI

#1 Jan 4, 2009
"Do police care about fireworks law?"

by Fred Harris
Kailua

Yes the fireworks are the worst that I have seen in many years. Not the worse, but getting there. I agree with your article on all issues 100%.

The only thing I can figure out is that first the police don't have enough money to enforce the laws. Also as you note they have to actually see the violations. Then finally the moral support is very low now. If you add all that up together then it just might be a good time for a rest. What else can it be?

The HPD are the best, but they can't just be floating around without money or support. Before being a police officer had a lot of pride with the job. Now days it's just a job ( for many ) and so that should answer your questions?

Their hands are tied in everything they do.
glenn paul

Johnson City, NY

#2 Jan 4, 2009
Von in Aiea wrote:
"Do police care about fireworks law?"
by Fred Harris
Kailua
Yes the fireworks are the worst that I have seen in many years. Not the worse, but getting there. I agree with your article on all issues 100%.
The only thing I can figure out is that first the police don't have enough money to enforce the laws. Also as you note they have to actually see the violations. Then finally the moral support is very low now. If you add all that up together then it just might be a good time for a rest. What else can it be?
The HPD are the best, but they can't just be floating around without money or support. Before being a police officer had a lot of pride with the job. Now days it's just a job ( for many ) and so that should answer your questions?
Their hands are tied in everything they do.
Hi Von., I agree the HPD are very good based on our observations as tourist. Sad to hear their hands are tied. I am sure if the fireworks law was to be enforced, it could be. The Governor and Mayor could make it happen. Sounds to me like the state doesn't want it enforced. It is 12 degrees here in Northeast PA. Oct, Nov, and Dec have been cold like we haven't seen in years. Oh well, the days are getting longer by I believe 30 seconds a day. And, in Hawaii I believe you are pushing towards the high sun days. Mahalo
glenn paul

Johnson City, NY

#3 Jan 4, 2009
Von., I miss hearing from Lana from, I believe, VA. She was young and was critized a lot but, she always had well thought out opinions. I hope Lana just didn't get tired of being critized. Lana stired up oposite opinions which generated a huge response. THAT WAS VERY GOOD. Got people thinking and talking. I think you agree with me. Lana., don't get discouraged because people disagree with you. Mahalo and Aloha from Northeast PA
STEPHEN FOX

United States

#4 Jan 4, 2009
My profoundest thanks to Sen. Suzanne Chun Oakland for again sponsoring a Senate Resolution asking the new FDA Commissioner to rescind approval for the neurotoxic artificial sweetener aspartame, and to the cosponsors thus far, Sen. Donna Mercado Kim, Sen. Kalani English, and Sen. Mike Gabbard. Hawai'i is fortunate to have legislators who care about consumer protection and can also easily see through and dismiss the reassuring misrepresentations of the corporate lobbyists who, as they did with Thalidomide, Cyclamates, Asbestos, and Vioxx, will go on telling everyone that aspartame is "safe," despite common knowledge that it is metabolized as methanol and formaldehyde.

Respectfully,
Stephen Fox
Political Editor New Mexico Sun News

Since: Mar 08

Aiea, HI

#5 Jan 4, 2009
glenn paul wrote:
Von., I miss hearing from Lana from, I believe, VA. She was young and was critized a lot but, she always had well thought out opinions. I hope Lana just didn't get tired of being critized. Lana stired up oposite opinions which generated a huge response. THAT WAS VERY GOOD. Got people thinking and talking. I think you agree with me. Lana., don't get discouraged because people disagree with you. Mahalo and Aloha from Northeast PA
Hi

Yes you are correct about Lana. I admire her for standing up to what she believes in which most of know is the Hawaii Kingdome.( Excuse me if I got the wording backwards.)

In my personnel opinion after the crazy guy sent from God to take back Hawaii and could not find the throne that was the last straw for Lana. After that Lana could not act very professional any longer. Yet I still think she is a great person, but if you believe in something then stay with it no matter what it is. Once you give up then the next time around it will be impossible to catch up again.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

#6 Jan 4, 2009
"...As an active member of the Hawaiian Civic Club for more than 45 years, and as a former president of the state association, I would never suggest anything that might harm our people.

Whitney T. Anderson
Waimanalo"

Quick question Whitney. Who is "our" people?

“Kokokahi -We are all one blood”

Since: Mar 08

United States

#7 Jan 4, 2009
Yeah wrote:
"...As an active member of the Hawaiian Civic Club for more than 45 years, and as a former president of the state association, I would never suggest anything that might harm our people.
Whitney T. Anderson
Waimanalo"
Quick question Whitney. Who is "our" people?
Whitney Anderson"s "our people" is the same as Lili'oulalani's "my people." The Queen was head of a multiracial nation, yet she repeatedly wrote and spoke about "my people" as a reference for ethnic Hawaiians. That's one reason she got overthrown. Whitney Anderson was already overthrown in an election, partly for the same reason.
Omama

San Jose, CA

#8 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
<quoted text>
Whitney Anderson"s "our people" is the same as Lili'oulalani's "my people." The Queen was head of a multiracial nation, yet she repeatedly wrote and spoke about "my people" as a reference for ethnic Hawaiians. That's one reason she got overthrown. Whitney Anderson was already overthrown in an election, partly for the same reason.
Ken,

My friend. I am curious.

Is it just Hawaiians that you seek to emulate and replace or do you have these unusual urges to extinguish and then impersonate other native people

I mean, do you ever find yourself wishing you were an Eskimo? How about an Apache? What about an Australian Aborigine? How about a Chamorro? Cherokee? Navajo?

Do you?

Or is it just a focused attempt to be a fake Hawaiian and Hawaiian only. And if that's the case, have you ever seen a psychiatrist for this problem? Do your parents know about this unusual fascination? How does your spouse or children feel about this medical oddity that you suffer from.

You can get help Pat. It might require some therapy but I'm sure you can rid yourself of this unhealthy desire to remove and replace a native people. I mean, you'll never be able to do it so it can't be a good thing psychologically speaking.

Get help Ken.

http://www.psych.org/

“Kokokahi -We are all one blood”

Since: Mar 08

United States

#9 Jan 4, 2009
Several writers seem to regret the absence of "Lana." But why? She seemed to spend a LOT of her time making vicious personal attacks instead of discussing the issues. For further information on Lana, including links to some of her hate-filled webpages, scroll down to the very bottom of this webpage:
http://tinyurl.com/5c8xcy
Omama

San Jose, CA

#10 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
<quoted text>
Whitney Anderson"s "our people" is the same as Lili'oulalani's "my people." The Queen was head of a multiracial nation, yet she repeatedly wrote and spoke about "my people" as a reference for ethnic Hawaiians. That's one reason she got overthrown. Whitney Anderson was already overthrown in an election, partly for the same reason.
Wrong

Revisionist.

Wannabe Hawaiian.

"As these materials taht follow demonstrate, this issue has some complexities, but the central answer is not in doubt: Native Hawaiians constituted the overwhelming majority of political community that participated in decision making in the Kingdom at the time of the 1893 overthrow."

Chapter 15, Who Owns The Crown Lands, Jon Van Dyyke, Professor of Law, University of Hawaii, Manoa.

Now who you gonna believe. A twisted professional Hawaiian wannabe like Conklin? Or a UH Law Professor.

Read the Chapter and decide for yourself.
Omama

San Jose, CA

#11 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
<quoted text>
Whitney Anderson"s "our people" is the same as Lili'oulalani's "my people." The Queen was head of a multiracial nation, yet she repeatedly wrote and spoke about "my people" as a reference for ethnic Hawaiians. That's one reason she got overthrown. Whitney Anderson was already overthrown in an election, partly for the same reason.
Who Owns The Crown Lands, Page 142.

"So what was the composition of the category of "citizens" or "subjects" of the Kingdom at the time of the overthrow in January of 1893? Hanifin acknowledged that as of the 1890 census, 84.42 percent of the citizens or subjects were Natives and surmised that this figure might have dropped to 80 percent by 1893."

Of course then we had the vote for Statehood once immigrants outnumbered Natives 6 to 1 and everyone says that's a fair vote.

Um hmmmm?
Omama

San Jose, CA

#12 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
<quoted text> The Queen was head of a multiracial nation, yet she repeatedly wrote and spoke about "my people" as a reference for ethnic Hawaiians. That's one reason she got overthrown.
You are somewhat correct here. The Queen was illegally overthrown because she was moving toward returning Hawaii to the Hawaiian Nation that it should have been by taking the powers that the Haole immigrant minority had been stripping from the monarchy over the past few decades. Especially that wonderful Democratic Constitution that Kalakaua was forced to sign at with a gun and sword pointed at his head (Bayonet Constitution). Gotta luv that Democracy in action, huh Conklin.

Fact is in the 1890 election, "Native Hawaiians had effectively wrested control of the Kingdom from those who had foisted the Bayonet Constitution on the Kingdom, and efforts were underway during the years that followed to reassert a stronger role for the Monarchy. Those who claim that the Native Hawaiians had lost control of the Kingdom prior to the 1893 overthrow are wrong."

Page 150. Jon Van Dyyke, UH Law Professor, Who Owns the Crown Lands.

Fact is Kenny, the overthrow occurred precisely BECAUSE Hawaiians were trying to take their country back from the Haole immigrants who were slowly trying to kill it off.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

#13 Jan 4, 2009
Omama wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong
Revisionist.
Wannabe Hawaiian.
"As these materials taht follow demonstrate, this issue has some complexities, but the central answer is not in doubt: Native Hawaiians constituted the overwhelming majority of political community that participated in decision making in the Kingdom at the time of the 1893 overthrow."
Chapter 15, Who Owns The Crown Lands, Jon Van Dyyke, Professor of Law, University of Hawaii, Manoa.
Now who you gonna believe. A twisted professional Hawaiian wannabe like Conklin? Or a UH Law Professor.
Read the Chapter and decide for yourself.
I thought you were against haole revisionist of Hawaiian history?

But now it's ok?

Pity you can't make up your mind. Or perhaps it's just selective memory?

Either way, pity.

“Kokokahi -We are all one blood”

Since: Mar 08

United States

#14 Jan 4, 2009
Replying to Omama:

1. I'm a civil rights activist. Why do I spend my time attacking Hawaiian race-based institutions and not other ones? First of all, please note that I have never attacked ethnic Hawaiians as a group, or on account of their race. I attack only those individuals and institutions who demand racially exclusionary handouts. I am opposed to racism, and that is what I attack. The vast majority of ethnic Hawaiians are patriotic Americans and good people, just like everybody else; and I have no quarrel at all with them. Why do I not attack the race-based institutions of other groups, like the Japanese Cultural Center or the Narcissus Festival? Because they are harmless. They are not seeking political power. They are not demanding creation of a racially exclusionary government to split apart the State of Hawaii or to rip the 50th star off the flag. The biggest threat to civil rights, unity, and equality in Hawaii comes from those ethnic Hawaiian individuals and institutions demanding racial supremacy; there are no similar individuals or institutions among ethnic Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Caucasians, etc.

2. Omama (and others) like to call me a "fake Hawaiian" or a "wannabe Hawaiian." Oh, puleeze! I've very happy being of English and Irish ancestry. But Hawaiian culture and language are the core of what makes Hawaii a special place. That's why I have learned Hawaiian language to a level of moderate fluency, attend Hawaiian cultural events, helped restore a heiau, etc. I love and respect Hawaiian culture and language, and participate in them in the same way as thousands of others who also have no native blood. Have you ever heard of Puakea Noglemeier, or Scott Crawford? They are haoles with zero Hawaiian blood, and they are far more zealous about participating in Hawaiian language and culture than I am; but I'll bet Omama would not call them wannabes. Or maybe he would? The only difference between Noglemeier and Crawford vs. me is that I am a political opponent of Hawaiian sovereignty.

Want to know more about me? Read
http://tinyurl.com/5c8xcy

Now, who the heck is "Omama" ?
Omama

San Jose, CA

#15 Jan 4, 2009
Yeah wrote:
Quick question Whitney. Who is "our" people?
Not you Mr. Wannabee.

Get your own culture.
Omama

San Jose, CA

#17 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
Replying to Omama:
1. I'm a civil rights activist. Why do I spend my time attacking Hawaiian race-based institutions and not other ones? First of all, please note that I have never attacked ethnic Hawaiians as a group, or on account of their race. I attack only those individuals and institutions who demand racially exclusionary handouts. I am opposed to racism, and that is what I attack. The vast majority of ethnic Hawaiians are patriotic Americans and good people, just like everybody else; and I have no quarrel at all with them. Why do I not attack the race-based institutions of other groups, like the Japanese Cultural Center or the Narcissus Festival? Because they are harmless. They are not seeking political power. They are not demanding creation of a racially exclusionary government to split apart the State of Hawaii or to rip the 50th star off the flag. The biggest threat to civil rights, unity, and equality in Hawaii comes from those ethnic Hawaiian individuals and institutions demanding racial supremacy; there are no similar individuals or institutions among ethnic Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Caucasians, etc.
Every other of the 49 states already have "tribes" or sovereign Nations within a Nation.

Why haven't the dire social consequences that you predict will occur in Hawaii happened in every other state.
Omama

San Jose, CA

#18 Jan 4, 2009
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>
I thought you were against haole revisionist of Hawaiian history?
But now it's ok?
Pity you can't make up your mind. Or perhaps it's just selective memory?
Either way, pity.
Actually, I'm not a racist like you.

I don't pick my historical facts based upon my own bias or any racist reasons like you do.

I trust the UH Law professor and the sources he cites more than a professional wannabee like you and Ken Conklin.

Doesn't mean I believe everything Van Dyyke says, but he provides far more in the way of facts and evidence than you 2 clowns ever do.
Omama

San Jose, CA

#19 Jan 4, 2009
Ken Conklin wrote:
Replying to Omama:
That's why I have learned Hawaiian language to a level of moderate fluency, attend Hawaiian cultural events, helped restore a heiau, etc. I love and respect Hawaiian culture and language, and participate in them in the same way as thousands of others who also have no native blood. Have you ever heard of Puakea Noglemeier, or Scott Crawford? They are haoles with zero Hawaiian blood, and they are far more zealous about participating in Hawaiian language and culture than I am; but I'll bet Omama would not call them wannabes. Or maybe he would? The only difference between Noglemeier and Crawford vs. me is that I am a political opponent of Hawaiian sovereignty.
No offense, really, but there is some psychological problem in your efforts.

Most Hawaiians, I would guess, find you repulsive. At this time in Hawaiian history, an anti-Sovereignty wannabee is not going to be embraced by the Hawaiian community. So why here? Why now? There are nearly 500 Indian Tribes that you could volunteer your time with, and help build fishing ponds and teepees. Why not go where you might actually be welcomed and accepted. Instead you go precisely where you know you will be attacked and rejected.

Gotta have something to do with rejection by your parents when you were a child. Really. I'm not kidding. Something is odd in your decision to become a full time Hawaiian wannabee as opposed to the near 500 other Native American options.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

#20 Jan 4, 2009
Omama wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, I'm not a racist like you.
I don't pick my historical facts based upon my own bias or any racist reasons like you do.
I trust the UH Law professor and the sources he cites more than a professional wannabee like you and Ken Conklin.
Doesn't mean I believe everything Van Dyyke says, but he provides far more in the way of facts and evidence than you 2 clowns ever do.
LOL!

Coming from the militant arm of the Hawaiian sovereignty movement, I think you just paid me compliment.

Keep talking. Because unlike you, when someone makes a point that looks interesting, I do try doing a bit more research to get clarity. That's something you hate to provide and prefer the "father knows best" mentality.

And you do cherry pick your facts. In fact, splicing quotes is one of your favorite past times. The same way you pick and select actual facts... and fail to answer questions about them as well.

The only racist here is you. You love using that word to goad or shame people into thinking they're wrong or have a complex. But it's really you who has no shame about it, making unfounded accusations. As I've told you before, it would be hard for you to call me a racist, especially since you've clarified what a hapa is.

Pity you can't make sense.

Such a pity.
alice

Honolulu, HI

#21 Jan 4, 2009
Van Dyke has his own agenda hon. His lack of objectivity and accuracy is famous on our campus.

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