Euless, Bedford Schools Adopt Daytime...

Euless, Bedford Schools Adopt Daytime Curfew

There are 54 comments on the NBC 5i Dallas/Fort Worth story from Oct 13, 2008, titled Euless, Bedford Schools Adopt Daytime Curfew. In it, NBC 5i Dallas/Fort Worth reports that:

Euless police say they will use a new daytime curfew as a tool to identify at-risk kids earlier, as the department teams up with the Hurst-Euless-Bedford school district to find students who are skipping class.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC 5i Dallas/Fort Worth.

First Prev
of 3
Next Last
buddy b

United States

#1 Oct 14, 2008
what the hell is going on here? I thought there were already truancy laws, someone reinventing the wheel?
C Martinez

Chesterfield, MO

#2 Oct 14, 2008
There has always been Trauncy laws,but they surely have not been inforced very well...especially in Dallas.Get on ball and stick with it!
buddy b

United States

#3 Oct 14, 2008
new laws that dont work will not do it, parents have to start parenting
C Martinez

Chesterfield, MO

#4 Oct 14, 2008
buddy b wrote:
new laws that dont work will not do it, parents have to start parenting
Yes I hope that parents instill in their kids to go to school everyday..but most parents have to work,and the majority of them leave the house before the kids.So what then?A parent in this day and time cannot be with kids 24/7.Most parents instill values in their kids...but when a kid gets a certain age..the peer pressure out their encourages them to go on the wrong path.
Jennifer

United States

#6 Oct 14, 2008
Please read what they are proposing.
http://www.bedfordpolice.com/important_update...
As a homeschooling parent I am very concerned about this new daytime curfew. My kids are up doing their schoolwork at 6am. Sometimes we are finished with bookwork by 11am. Next comes real life learning which sometimes takes us away from our home out into the public. This new curfew says that if I am out with my school age children I can be cited. I must then go to court and prove that I am a homeschooler. There are no exemptions only defenses to prosecution. This curfew is a violation of our rights.
anon

San Angelo, TX

#7 Oct 14, 2008
That's why you shouldn't homeschool. Why would you want to jeopardize your children's future like that? You think 5 hours a day with mom can match 8 hours in a scholastic, peer-inclusive environment?

I've met home-schooled people before. They were very naive and sheltered. One, whom I met in the service, told me that she needed special dispensation to even join the service as they service didn't recognize her home-school credentials as 'real.'
Liberty

United States

#8 Oct 14, 2008
This law is an affront to the Constitution, specifically the 4th amendment, which states that we have the right to freedom from unreasonable search and seizure. Arresting a juvenile on "suspicion" that he/she is truant is certainly unreasonable. Juries who are called on to convict individuals are NOT bound to do what the judge tells them - they need to find the accused "not guilty", because the law itself is in error. We are not bound to obey laws that are unconstitutional!

BTW, I am homeschooled and do not consider myself "naive" by any means. I had the opportunity to learn about any subject that I wished, as well as learning the three R's. Five hours a day with a parent is one-on-one time with someone who truly wants to see the you learn. 8 hours in a classroom is more likely to be 30-to-1 interaction. I have also been in a college setting and can say from experience that learning in a homeschool environment is faster, more effective, and more enjoyable.
Liberty

United States

#9 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
That's why you shouldn't homeschool. Why would you want to jeopardize your children's future like that?
The State is the only one jeopardizing the children's future. It is not up to us as private citizens to bow to draconian laws. The blame for any harm caused by this law rests not on parents or children/teens who won't abide by it (as it is unconstitutional), but on the counties that have illegally implemented this restriction.
buddy b

United States

#10 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
That's why you shouldn't homeschool. Why would you want to jeopardize your children's future like that? You think 5 hours a day with mom can match 8 hours in a scholastic, peer-inclusive environment?
I've met home-schooled people before. They were very naive and sheltered. One, whom I met in the service, told me that she needed special dispensation to even join the service as they service didn't recognize her home-school credentials as 'real.'
Oh, you would prefer them to be in DISD ?
anon

San Angelo, TX

#11 Oct 14, 2008
Suspicion is relative. School hours are a set time. If a child is outside of school during that time, it is suspicious, period. If the parent is with them, I highly doubt they'd be cited. It's a little thing called common sense. I see it's not that common, unfortunately.
buddy b

United States

#12 Oct 14, 2008
Are in Abilene where teachers offer grades for sex

“Liberty is Contagious”

Since: May 08

United States

#13 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
That's why you shouldn't homeschool. Why would you want to jeopardize your children's future like that? You think 5 hours a day with mom can match 8 hours in a scholastic, peer-inclusive environment?
I've met home-schooled people before. They were very naive and sheltered. One, whom I met in the service, told me that she needed special dispensation to even join the service as they service didn't recognize her home-school credentials as 'real.'
I suggest you sit down and figure out how much "learning" time a child actually gets in public school. Most figures run around 14-15 minutes a class. Then the child is having to compete with 20 other kids for the teachers help. Now throw in your "peer-inclusive" environment, gangs, drugs, sex, assaults and other crime. What fun!

I would say that 5hrs a day with one-on-one teaching blows away public school.

“Liberty is Contagious”

Since: May 08

United States

#14 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
Suspicion is relative. School hours are a set time. If a child is outside of school during that time, it is suspicious, period. If the parent is with them, I highly doubt they'd be cited. It's a little thing called common sense. I see it's not that common, unfortunately.
Suspicious period, is that soem new class or something? Seriously, I understand what your saying.

What's so concerning here is not the "suspisious period". An officer could stop any juvenile out in public during school hours to envestigate if they were truant. The problem is that they only included homeschoolers under a defense to prosecution, not an exemption. Thus if a homeschooler is caught on the sidewalk two houses down, they can be cited and taken into custody and have to prove their innocence in court. Wheras if they were exempted they could prove they were exempt on the spot and be on their way.
anon

San Angelo, TX

#15 Oct 14, 2008
Sovereignty wrote:
<quoted text>
I suggest you sit down and figure out how much "learning" time a child actually gets in public school. Most figures run around 14-15 minutes a class. Then the child is having to compete with 20 other kids for the teachers help. Now throw in your "peer-inclusive" environment, gangs, drugs, sex, assaults and other crime. What fun!
I would say that 5hrs a day with one-on-one teaching blows away public school.
Life lessons (those things you alluded to in your "what fun" statement) cannot be taught at home. You can't teach inter-personal skills in large groups when the kid isn't allowed out of the house.

I have a friend who was homeschooled for a year. His mom was a pothead who was rarely home.....some teacher.
anon

San Angelo, TX

#16 Oct 14, 2008
Sovereignty wrote:
<quoted text>
Suspicious period, is that soem new class or something? Seriously, I understand what your saying.
What's so concerning here is not the "suspisious period". An officer could stop any juvenile out in public during school hours to envestigate if they were truant. The problem is that they only included homeschoolers under a defense to prosecution, not an exemption. Thus if a homeschooler is caught on the sidewalk two houses down, they can be cited and taken into custody and have to prove their innocence in court. Wheras if they were exempted they could prove they were exempt on the spot and be on their way.
The trouble with your assessment is that the kid is supposed to be trust. If the kid is out and about with the parent, it's kind of obvious that he's not skipping school. However, if the child is out on his own, he still has to prove himself because by and large kids are in school during set times. If you don't want to have to prove innocence, don't let the child out during that time. You can't use the cop-out "I learn more in 5 hours so he can go play by 11." Public schools are from 7:30 to 2:30 or even 4:30. If you know this, and you know the law, then don't let it appear that you're breaking the law.

They also have curfews at night in many cities. Yet parents support this. Why that and not day curfews? Is it not the same thing? Some child out and out, minding his own business, supposedly?

“Liberty is Contagious”

Since: May 08

United States

#17 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
<quoted text>
Life lessons (those things you alluded to in your "what fun" statement) cannot be taught at home. You can't teach inter-personal skills in large groups when the kid isn't allowed out of the house.
I have a friend who was homeschooled for a year. His mom was a pothead who was rarely home.....some teacher.
You apparently have very little exposure to home schoolers. There are many group get together, sports organizations and so on. My daughter is no where near locked up in the house. She plays basket ball, volley ball, kick boxes and shoots really well. While most public schools attendees brains go dormant during summer, she is still learning. Also to equate life lessons with gang violence, drugs and sex is just asinine. You bet she doesn't get taught those things at home.

“Liberty is Contagious”

Since: May 08

United States

#18 Oct 14, 2008
anon wrote:
<quoted text>
The trouble with your assessment is that the kid is supposed to be trust. If the kid is out and about with the parent, it's kind of obvious that he's not skipping school. However, if the child is out on his own, he still has to prove himself because by and large kids are in school during set times. If you don't want to have to prove innocence, don't let the child out during that time. You can't use the cop-out "I learn more in 5 hours so he can go play by 11." Public schools are from 7:30 to 2:30 or even 4:30. If you know this, and you know the law, then don't let it appear that you're breaking the law.
Please learn the difference between "exception" and "defense to prosecution" and you will understand what I am trying to say. I never said that a suspicion of truancy couldn't be investigated, I take exception to the fact that an innocent person could be taken into custody or cited though they did nothing wrong.
anon wrote:
<quoted text>They also have curfews at night in many cities. Yet parents support this. Why that and not day curfews? Is it not the same thing? Some child out and out, minding his own business, supposedly?
There are many exceptions to the night curfew, not daytime curfew. Again exception vs defense to prosecution.
anon

San Angelo, TX

#19 Oct 14, 2008
Sovereignty wrote:
You bet she doesn't get taught those things at home.
I know she doesn't. That means she doesn't know what to look out for in a dark parking lot. She doesn't know what type of people to avoid to prevent becoming a victim. She doesn't know "how guys are" because she's got no exposure to them.

Congrats on raising a future victim. I'm sure she'll be thrilled.
anon

San Angelo, TX

#20 Oct 14, 2008
Sovereignty wrote:
<quoted text>
Please learn the difference between "exception" and "defense to prosecution" and you will understand what I am trying to say. I never said that a suspicion of truancy couldn't be investigated, I take exception to the fact that an innocent person could be taken into custody or cited though they did nothing wrong.
<quoted text>
There are many exceptions to the night curfew, not daytime curfew. Again exception vs defense to prosecution.
Firstly, there is *NO* exception when the cops find a teen walking out at 1 am. He's getting picked up no matter what he says.

Secondly, if you want to avoid having to be suspected, either be with your child (which you should be anyway) or don't let them out during school hours. Simple. Resolved. Next?
Parent

Schaumburg, IL

#21 Oct 14, 2008
Why should the cops have to control the kids, the parenets need to know what is going on.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Euless Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Colleyville,Texas Murder of Anita Fox (Mar '15) Aug 18 Clark Kent 131
News Slain wife called last years of marriage a not ... Aug 15 Steven 1
Review: Lugger, Jerry L MD - Jerry L Lugger MD (Jan '10) Aug 13 Big bad john 9
News The student who was suspended for bringing a ho... Aug 10 Marie-Luise_J 1
Need your help locating someone! (Sep '14) Aug 9 Jamie Dundee 7
Carla Chandler Aug 7 Big bad john 2
Review: iLoveKickboxing - Bedford (Dec '15) Jul 29 kristyj 21

Euless Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Euless Mortgages