A Few Thoughts
JWRussell USNR

El Paso, TX

#1 Dec 13, 2013
Rare souls captivate our imagination and spur us to great works. Those souls visit the Earth every generation; rarely do we know that they have lived. But they are able to lead us to greater levels of equality and humanity.

Political, economic and social disenfranchisement is nothing new to the world. Oppression is rooted in the human soul; we have the power to impose unjust practices and situations upon one another in myriad ways. History is replete with the stories and struggle of the demise of political structures visiting injustice upon people. The names of the leaders of those movements resonate and touch the deepest reaches of our souls from Moses to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and César Chávez.

They suffer for the ending of injustice. They pull us along their journey and call us to stand in solidarity with the oppressed. They challenge the structures that dominate and crush the human spirit. They give us words that enliven and empower us to continue in the struggle.

Such was the man, Nelson Mandela. He and his compatriots pulled the vision of the world to the plight of South Africa in the late 20th century, drawing our focus to the injustice of apartheid. The anti-apartheid movement captured our collective imagination and called us to the cause. We mourned as his prison messages from prison were shared by word of mouth before the advent of Internet technology. We celebrated his release from prison after 27 years of isolation from the world. We claimed his ascent to the presidency of South Africa as our own accomplishment. We cherished his wisdom, his words and his vision.

For almost three decades, we had in our midst this man -- raised to social and political equality, a constant reminder of our responsibility to one another, an accountability compass. He has gone from the world but his life stands as symbol for our age.
Paul Gonzalez

El Paso, TX

#2 Dec 13, 2013
JWRussell USNR wrote:
Rare souls captivate our imagination and spur us to great works. Those souls visit the Earth every generation; rarely do we know that they have lived. But they are able to lead us to greater levels of equality and humanity.
Political, economic and social disenfranchisement is nothing new to the world. Oppression is rooted in the human soul; we have the power to impose unjust practices and situations upon one another in myriad ways. History is replete with the stories and struggle of the demise of political structures visiting injustice upon people. The names of the leaders of those movements resonate and touch the deepest reaches of our souls from Moses to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and César Chávez.
They suffer for the ending of injustice. They pull us along their journey and call us to stand in solidarity with the oppressed. They challenge the structures that dominate and crush the human spirit. They give us words that enliven and empower us to continue in the struggle.
Such was the man, Nelson Mandela. He and his compatriots pulled the vision of the world to the plight of South Africa in the late 20th century, drawing our focus to the injustice of apartheid. The anti-apartheid movement captured our collective imagination and called us to the cause. We mourned as his prison messages from prison were shared by word of mouth before the advent of Internet technology. We celebrated his release from prison after 27 years of isolation from the world. We claimed his ascent to the presidency of South Africa as our own accomplishment. We cherished his wisdom, his words and his vision.
For almost three decades, we had in our midst this man -- raised to social and political equality, a constant reminder of our responsibility to one another, an accountability compass. He has gone from the world but his life stands as symbol for our age.
Those are warm, lovely sentiments. Thank you for sharing them.
Que

El Paso, TX

#3 Dec 13, 2013
Paul Gonzalez wrote:
<quoted text>
Those are warm, lovely sentiments. Thank you for sharing them.
Did my sperm leave a stain on your bedspread?
David Villanueva

El Paso, TX

#4 Dec 13, 2013
JWRussell USNR wrote:
Rare souls captivate our imagination and spur us to great works. Those souls visit the Earth every generation; rarely do we know that they have lived. But they are able to lead us to greater levels of equality and humanity.
Political, economic and social disenfranchisement is nothing new to the world. Oppression is rooted in the human soul; we have the power to impose unjust practices and situations upon one another in myriad ways. History is replete with the stories and struggle of the demise of political structures visiting injustice upon people. The names of the leaders of those movements resonate and touch the deepest reaches of our souls from Moses to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and César Chávez.
They suffer for the ending of injustice. They pull us along their journey and call us to stand in solidarity with the oppressed. They challenge the structures that dominate and crush the human spirit. They give us words that enliven and empower us to continue in the struggle.
Such was the man, Nelson Mandela. He and his compatriots pulled the vision of the world to the plight of South Africa in the late 20th century, drawing our focus to the injustice of apartheid. The anti-apartheid movement captured our collective imagination and called us to the cause. We mourned as his prison messages from prison were shared by word of mouth before the advent of Internet technology. We celebrated his release from prison after 27 years of isolation from the world. We claimed his ascent to the presidency of South Africa as our own accomplishment. We cherished his wisdom, his words and his vision.
For almost three decades, we had in our midst this man -- raised to social and political equality, a constant reminder of our responsibility to one another, an accountability compass. He has gone from the world but his life stands as symbol for our age.
Nice! I too thought Mandela was a great man. It's nice to see some good comments about him as opposed to that slob O'Reilly who called him a commie.
Yankee Doodle Garcia

El Paso, TX

#5 Dec 13, 2013
David Villanueva wrote:
<quoted text>
Nice! I too thought Mandela was a great man. It's nice to see some good comments about him as opposed to that slob O'Reilly who called him a commie.
I was never impressed with the ex con.

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